Nikki Giovanni — 'We Go Forward With a Sanity and a Love'
Play • 51 min

It feels good and right this week to sit with the beloved writer Nikki Giovanni’s signature mix of high seriousness, sweeping perspective, and insistent pleasure. In the 1960s, she was a poet of the Black Arts Movement that nourished civil rights. She’s also a professor at Virginia Tech, where she brought beauty and courage after the 2007 shooting there. And she’s an adored voice to a new generation — an enthusiastic elder to us all — at home in her body and in the world of her lifetime even while she sees and delights in the beyond of it.

Nikki Giovanni is a University Distinguished Professor in the English department at Virginia Tech. She has written and edited numerous books of poetry and works for children, including Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea, Black Feeling, Black Talk/Black Judgment, and The Collected Poetry of Nikki Giovanni. Her latest work is Make Me Rain: Poems & Prose.

Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.

This show originally aired on March 17, 2016.

Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
ABC News
#326: How to Make a Masterpiece | Pete Docter
We’re all creatives, whether we think of ourselves that way or not. In so many aspects of your life, from planning your future to planning a meal to curating your social media, you need to be able to both envision and then execute. And how you work with your mind in these moments is key. Today, we are going to hear from a master creator -- the mind behind brilliant Pixar movies such as Inside Out, Up, and the recently-released Soul -- about how to run a creative process at the highest possible level. (I have a six-year-old, and, in my opinion, one of the worst parts of the job of being a dad is sitting through insipid children's entertainment. But the aforementioned films have been both thrilling and moving to consume, for both me and my son.) My guest today is Pete Docter, who directed all three of those films. He is the Chief Creative Officer of Pixar. He is also a meditator and a practicing Christian whose films are each motivated by a big, pressing question he is posing to himself about his own life. In this conversation, he takes us inside the making of his films, most notably Soul, for which he and his team had to invent a coherent metaphysical scheme to explain both the afterlife -- and the before. We also talk about how his spiritual practices support his storytelling endeavors, and how to power through the pain, frustration, and embarrassment of trying to make something truly original. One more thing: We would appreciate it if you could take a few minutes to help us out by answering a survey about your experience with this podcast. Our team here cares deeply about you, our listeners, and we are always looking for ways to improve. Please go to https://www.tenpercent.com/survey. And thank you. Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/pete-docter-326
51 min
All My Relations Podcast
All My Relations Podcast
Matika Wilbur & Adrienne Keene
Hawaiian Resistance, Tourism & Abolition: For The Love of The Mauna, Part 3
Please join us for the third and final piece of our series on the movement to protect Mauna Kea. We have been incredibly humbled and blessed to have reported on the movement, and are so grateful to everyone who made this possible.  During the pandemic as tourist numbers have dropped, fish have returned in areas in Hawai’i where they have been absent for years. The land is healing itself. Despite the toll excessive tourism and capitalism has taken on the Hawaiian islands; there is still hope to heal. 27 years ago in 1993, tourists outnumbered Hawaiian residents 6:1 and Native Hawaiians 30:1. Imagine how those figures have risen today...  The Mauna Kea movement has been one of relationships: to land, water, air, kanaka (people), and spirit. On this episode we hear again from the incredible Jamaica Osorio, activist, educator, and cultural practitioner; and Dr. Auntie Noe Noe Wong-Wilson, scholar, poet, and activist. They discuss the lessons and revelations  from time on the Mauna and pathways forward to honor relationships and empower future generations.  We recorded this episode the day after the violent insurrection on the Capitol, so we bring in our thoughts about resistance, activism, and overthrow under settler colonialism.  We hope that through this series you can join us in imagining an otherwise future, built and cemented in Indigenous relationships. There is so much to learn beyond this series, so please continue learning alongside us. “We are certainly not too late to live in dignity with our āina” - Jamaica Osorio +++ All My Relations is Listener Supported Become a Patron: https://www.patreon.com/allmyrelationspodcast Follow Dr. Noe Noe Wong Wilson, Executive Director of The LĀLĀKEA FOUNDATION Jamaica Osorio on Instagram All My Relations on Instagram Support https://www.puuhuluhulu.com/ https://www.protectmaunakea.net/donate Music and Oli  Masa Kobayashi  Kanaeokana  La’ Howard Episode art by  Ciara Sana. Fiscal Sponsorship by Speak Out! Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast) Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)
51 min
Death, Sex & Money
Death, Sex & Money
WNYC Studios
I Was Your Father, Until I Wasn't
Tony* wasn't sure what to say when the woman he'd slept with told him she was pregnant. First, he says, there was a long pause. They weren't a couple, and he didn't want to say the wrong thing. "I told her that it was her choice and if she chose to keep it, then I would be a good dad," he remembers. "I was freaking out." At the time, Tony was in his mid-20s, working as a bartender and photographer in a college town out west. Tony started paying child support for his daughter near the end of the pregnancy, went to prenatal appointments, and took parenting classes along with the baby's mother. On the day his daughter was born, Tony cut the umbilical cord. And Tony was an active father. As soon as his daughter could take a bottle, he says he started sharing custody of her, sometimes watching her three or four days a week. "We were really just good buddies," he says. "It felt good to have purpose, and it felt amazing to love something so much, in a completely new way." Money became a source of tension, though, between Tony and the baby's mother. So did the fact that as his daughter got older, she started looking less like him or her mother. Tony decided to get a paternity test when his daughter was about a year old. "I couldn't play it dumb forever," Tony says—but he also feared the results. "That's not something that you want to know, especially when you love something so much." Tony quickly learned the truth: he had a zero percent probability of being the biological father. He called the mother to tell her, and soon after that, he met Victor*, the man who is his daughter's biological father. Over beers, they talked about Tony's shock, Victor's suspicions from the sidelines, and their plan for the little girl they both considered a daughter. More than two years later, they joined me to talk about the logistics and emotions of the transition that followed, which included packing up a pickup truck with nursery furniture to move it from Tony's place to Victor's. This episode first aired in 2017. *Last names have been withheld for privacy reasons.
30 min
How to Save a Planet
How to Save a Planet
Gimlet
Kelp Farming, for the Climate (Part II)
So, what do you do with 579 pounds of seaweed? In our last episode, we ventured into the ocean to learn how seaweed farming can help solve climate change. In part II, we ask: What do we do with all that kelp? Plus our team does some seaweed R&D of its own and discovers...green scones? Calls to action Check out the New York State Assembly Bill A4213 on seaweed cultivation and for residents of New York, check out the petition. Encourage innovation with kelp: Whether you work in fertilizers, plastics, cosmetics, or any industry, you can encourage your company to do R&D with kelp. Maybe it could serve as a substitute for less climate-friendly ingredients and materials. And if you need a middleman to source from, check out The Crop Project, founded by Casey Emmett whom we interviewed this episode. Consider kelp products: If you are interested in making any kelp flour recipes, do a search for online retailers and don’t forget to share what you make! Send photos, video or audio to howtosaveaplanet@spotify.com Learn more Read Dune Lankard’s amazing piece in the GreenWave newsletter, A Native Perspective on Regenerative Ocean Farming. Also check out Duke’s organization, Native Conservancy. Emily Stengel, Bren Smith’s co-founder and co-executive director of GreenWave, also wrote about regenerative ocean farming in Ayana’s anthology All We Can Save. Go have a read (or listen)! Watch “The Future of Seafood,” a discussion that Ayana moderated with Bren Smith and Sean Barrett of Dock to Dish.
44 min
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