Aspen Ideas to Go
Aspen Ideas to Go
Dec 29, 2020
The World Needs Women in Leadership Roles
Play • 25 min

Today’s women are warriors and peacemakers, athletes and artists. Women in leadership roles can play a crucial role in leading us toward a better and more equitable future, and women must be part of the solution to the current global crises. Former US secretary of state Madeleine K. Albright and former prime minister of New Zealand the Honorable Helen Clark are trailbreaking leaders and powerful advocates for women’s empowerment. They speak with the Aspen Institute’s Forum on Women and Girls co-chair Peggy Clark about women’s roles on the global stage now and into the future.

Materialism
Materialism
Taylor Sparks and Andrew Falkowski
Episode 32: μ: The Elixir of Civilization
A review of the book "Scientific Freedom: The Elixir of Civilization" by Donald Braben. Taylor and Andrew drive into the radical ideas Braben implemented in his role as Director of Venture Research at BP. They examine the principles behind Venture Research and the potential for this approach to revolutionize scientific discovery by increasing freedom and creativity. Who knows? Maybe this approach would discover this century's Einsteins, Plancks, Rutherfords and more! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com. Make sure to subscribe to the show on iTunes, Spotify, google play, and now Youtube or wherever you find your podcasts. If you like the show and want to help us reach more people, consider leaving a review - it helps us improve and it exposes new people to the show. Finally, check out our Instagram page @materialism.podcast and connect with us to let us know what new material you’d like to hear about next. We’d like to give a shoutout to AlphaBot for allowing us to use his music within the podcast. Check him out on Spotify. And as always a special thanks to Kolobyte who created the intro and outro for our podcast. He makes a ton of really cool synthwave music which you can check out at kolobyte.bandcamp.com. Visit our sponsors for this episode www.materialstoday.com, and matmatch.com. Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/materialism.podcast/?hl=en Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaterialismPod Visit our website: www.materialismpodcast.com Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-creator, co-host, production), Andrew Falkowski (co-creator, co-host, production), Jared Duffy (production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (editing assistance) Support Materialism by donating to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism
18 min
Casual Inference
Casual Inference
Lucy D'Agostino McGowan and Ellie Murray
Celebrating 100 years with a look forwards and back with the D'Agostinos | Season 2 Episode 3
In this episode Ellie Murray and Lucy D’Agostino McGowan chat with Ralph D’Agostino Sr. and Ralph D’Agostino Jr. about their careers in statistics, looking back at how things have developed and forward at where they see the world of statistics and epidemiology going. We’re excited to kick off the 100th year of the American Journal of Epidemiology with this episode. Ralph D’Agostino Sr. is a professor of Mathematics/Statistics, Biostatistics, and Epidemiology at Boston University. He has been the lead biostatistician for the Framingham Heart Study, a biostatistical consultant to The New England Journal of Medicine, an editor of Statistics in Medicine and lead editor of their Tutorials, and a member and consultant on FDA committees. His major fields of research are clinical trials, prognostic models, longitudinal analysis, multivariate analysis, robustness, and outcomes/effectiveness research. Ralph D’Agostino Jr. is a professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Data Science at Wake Forest University where he is the Director of the Biostatistics Core of the Comprehensive Cancer Center. Methodologically his research includes developing statistical techniques for evaluating data from observational settings, handling missing data in applied problems, and developing predictive functions to identify prospectively patients at elevated risk for future negative outcomes. Some of his recent work includes the development of methods using propensity score models to identify safety signals in large retrospective databases. It also turns out they are Lucy’s father and grandfather, so we have 3 generations of statisticians on the pod! We also have Amit Sasson on to discuss the winning cookie from the #EpiCookieChallenge as well as her work in causal inference! Follow along on Twitter: * The American Journal of Epidemiology: @AmJEpi * Ellie: @EpiEllie * Lucy: @LucyStats 🎶 Our intro/outro music is courtesy of Joseph McDade. 👩‍🎨 Our artwork is by Allison Horst.
1 hr 3 min
Generation Green New Deal
Generation Green New Deal
Critical Frequency
S1 Ep9 | Charles Booker for Kentucky
In 2019 Charles Booker, a 35-year-old Kentucky state representative decided to challenge Mitch McConnell, the most powerful Republican Senator, by running for Senate on a Green New Deal. But the Democratic establishment already had a preferred candidate, Amy McGrath. As the campaign got underway Booker looked like the longest of long shots. And while he did not ultimately win the primary, Booker shocked the world by very nearly defeating the best funded Senate candidate in history, winning 43% of the vote in a state many had written off as impossible for a progressive candidate.  GenGND tells the story of Charles Booker’s incredible 2020 campaign and the lessons it holds for how the Green New Deal movement can win even in states the Democratic party has abandoned. Featuring Charles Booker himself, Charles’ former Deputy Campaign Manager (and Sunrise Movement Electoral Politics Director) Shante Wolfe, Sunrise Political Director Evan Weber, and Creative Director Alex O’Keefe.  Support GenGND: https://www.patreon.com/generationgnd Support Charles Booker’s organization Hood to the Holler: https://hoodtotheholler.org/ Watch Sunrise Movement’s videos for Charles:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEb_pVZ05V0 https://www.youtube.com/watdch?v=2MWCHSx6Wwo Subscribe to GenGND's newsletter: https://generationgnd.substack.com/subscribe Episode transcript & more available at: www.generationgreennewdeal.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
37 min
Sustainability Defined
Sustainability Defined
Jay Siegel & Scott Breen
*UPDATED* Ep 32: Reversing Global Warming with Paul Hawken (Project Drawdown)
Happy 2021, Definers! This month we have an update to one of our most popular episodes ever. We interviewed Paul Hawken of Project Drawdown back in June 2018. For those unfamiliar, Project Drawdown is a non-profit focused on helping the world reach “Drawdown,” which is the future point in time when the levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere stop climbing and start to steadily decline. The need to reach Drawdown is as important as ever, so we thought it would be a good episode to revisit to start the year. Before playing the original episode, we provide an update on Project Drawdown’s many activities since we interviewed Paul, including releasing Drawdown Review 2020 that has a new framework for the most impactful activities to reach Drawdown and starting Drawdown Labs to engage the private sector. We’ll be back next month with fully new episodes of Sustainability Defined. In the meantime, have a wonderful start to the new year and enjoy this episode! ----------------------------- SustainabilityDefined is the podcast that seeks to define sustainability, one concept (and bad joke) at a time. Hosted by Jay Siegel and Scott Breen. Each episode focuses on a single topic that helps push sustainability forward. We explain each topic with the help of an experienced pro, place it within our organizational tree, and help our listeners define what exactly sustainability is, episode by episode. We have divided our organizational tree into the following seven sectors: Energy Cities Natural Environment Transportation Business Policy Social Each episode is categorized under one of our sectors and visually depicted within our organizational tree. The more episodes we complete, the more the tree will visually define what exactly sustainability means. www.sustainabilitydefined.com
1 hr 5 min
Future Positive
Future Positive
XPRIZE Foundation
Smartphones In Healthcare And The Current Pandemic
Much of the fundamental research in computer science has been driven by the needs of those attempting to utilize computing for various applications, including healthcare. Today’s guest, Shwetak Patel describes a collection of research projects that leverage mobile phone technology in new ways to enable the screening, self-management and studying of diseases.    By using mobile phones as healthcare devices, we can enable access and scale, helping advance health and clinical science through the convergence of sensing, machine learning, and human-computer interaction.    Today’s episode was originally recorded at AI For Good, an annual global summit hosted by ITU and XPRIZE, and while some elements of the conversation are more timely to COVID’s spread in July 2020 at the time of recording, all of the technology is still relevant today.     Shwetak Naran Patel is an American computer scientist and entrepreneur best known for his work on developing novel sensing solutions and ubiquitous computing. He is the Washington Research Foundation Entrepreneurship Endowed Professor at the University of Washington in Computer Science & Engineering and Electrical Engineering, where he joined in 2008. His technology start-up company on energy sensing, Zensi, was acquired by Belkin International, Inc. in 2010. He was named a 2011 MacArthur Fellow. He was named the recipient of the 2018 ACM Prize in Computing for contributions to creative and practical sensing systems for sustainability and health.     Links:  https://aiforgood.itu.int/  https://xprize.org/blog See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 2 min
New Books in Political Science
New Books in Political Science
Marshall Poe
P. Chachavalpongpun, "Coup, King, Crisis: A Critical Interregnum in Thailand" (Yale SEA Studies, 2020)
There are many Orientalist stereotypes about Thailand. Known as the “Land of Smiles” to foreign tourists, they often comment on the calm and pleasant demeanor of a people seemingly averse to conflict. However, these are superficial remarks coming from observers who fail to understand the country’s language, culture, and deep social, cultural, and political tensions. Since the bloodless end of the absolute monarchy in 1932, there have been a dozen successful coups, a few more unsuccessful efforts, and the spilling of blood in several massacres. From the Cold War to well into the 21st century, Thailand has wavered between democracy and military rule, with the Chakri Dynasty’s kings ruling over the political pendulum. Pavin Chachavalpongpun’s edited volume Coup King Crisis: A Critical Interregnum in Thailand out in 2021 with Yale University Southeast Asia Studies is a collection of essays on the 2014 coup. The authors explore the complex relationship between the monarchy, the military, and democracy. The volume does an excellent job of giving larger context to Thai politics. Dr. Pavin Chachavalpongpun, a native of Bangkok, studied at Chulalongkorn University before earning his doctorate at SOAS. Before becoming an academic and an activist, he served as a diplomat in the Thai Ministry of Foreign Affairs for 13 years. He is currently an Associate Professor at Kyoto University’s Center for Southeast Asian Studies, where he edits the Kyoto Review of Southeast Asian Studies. Pavin Chachavalpongpun is arguably the most internationally prominent Thai dissident, penning critiques of the Thai junta for the world’s leading newspapers. He is the author or editor of a number of books on Thai politics. Michael G. Vann is a professor of world history at California State University, Sacramento. A specialist in imperialism and the Cold War in Southeast Asia, he is the author of The Great Hanoi Rat Hunt: Empires, Disease, and Modernity in French Colonial Vietnam (Oxford University Press, 2018). When he’s not reading or talking about new books with smart people, Mike can be found surfing in Santa Cruz, California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 7 min
A Matter of Degrees
A Matter of Degrees
Leah Stokes, Katharine Wilkinson
The ‘Darth Vader’ of Electric Utilities
In 2013, a series of attack ads blitzed television sets across Arizona. They warned of a dire threat to senior citizens. Who was the villain? Solar energy. These ads came from front groups funded by Arizona Public Service, the state’s largest utility. It was part of a years-long fight against rooftop solar that turned ugly. “I mean, for Star Wars fans, APS became the Darth Vader of electric utilities in America. I mean, I think you would be hard-pressed to find a utility that behaved as badly as APS did in the last decade,” explains former regulator Kris Mayes. But APS isn’t alone. It’s a prime example of how monopoly utilities abuse their power to influence regulatory decisions and slow clean-energy progress. What happens if your electric utility starts doing things you don’t agree with? What if they start attacking solar and proposing to build more and more fossil gas plants? What if they actively resist clean energy progress? Well, you don’t get a choice. You have to buy electricity, and you have to buy it from them. As a customer you’re funding that. In this episode, we’ll detail how it happened in Arizona -- and how public pressure forced APS’ to come clean. Featured in this episode: Ryan Randazzo, Kris Mayes, David Pomerantz. Follow our co-hosts and production team: * Leah Stokes * Katharine Wilkinson * Stephen Lacey * Jaime Kaiser A Matter of Degrees is a production of Post Script Audio. For more episodes and transcripts, visit our website.
52 min
Social Science Bites
Social Science Bites
SAGE Publishing
Mike Tomasello on Becoming Human
Consider two different, but similar situations. In the first, children are asked to pull ropes together. Candy cascades down, but in unequal distribution – three for one child and one for the other. In the second situation, the children come across the sweets but without joint labor, and again find an uneven distribution. What usually happens next differs between the two situations. When the kids work together, they tend to willingly share the proceeds so everyone ends up with an equal share. But when the candy was discovered through individual serendipity, the children tend to accept the uneven outcome and don’t equalize shares. The first situation involves what Mike Tomasello, the James F. Bonk Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Duke University, would call joint commitment; “When children produce sweets collaboratively they feel they should share them equally.” There’s no explicit promise of an equal share, but there is an implicit one that’s just as recognizable and genuine. As Tomasello details to interviewer David Edmonds in this Social Science Bites podcast, “I can say I don’t like it when you keep all the sweets – that’s my personal opinion – but when I say ‘you shouldn’t do that, you mustn’t do that, you must do this, you have to do that,’ this is not my personal opinion. This is something objective.” While this might be a normative bond that helps glue humans together, it’s not a bond he finds in our closest relatives. Tomasello points out that among chimps – with which the longtime co-director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology has a deep background researching - the dominant partner takes the spoils in almost all cases. The “we-ness” that can mark human behavior is replaced by the “me-ness” of other primates. That difference between primates and people is the basis of much of Tomasello’s career (see the work of the Tomasello Lab at Duke: “studying the development and evolution of social cognition, communication, and cooperation“) and of his 2018 book, Becoming Human: A Theory of Ontogeny. Much of his effort has focused on great apes, our closest primate relatives, following a line of research that started with Jane Goodall learning that apes make and use tools. Great apes share many qualities with human beings – they understand causal relations, can work with the concept of quantities, can predict what others might do based on what they see and what their goal is, are good social learners, can communicate with gestures (and can learn new ones), and can work with one another in some cases. But Tomasello notes a key area in which apes and people differ. “Humans put their heads together, as a general phrase, to accomplish things that neither one can do on his or her own. So if you look at all the things you think are most amazing about humans – we’re building skyscrapers, we have social institutions like governments, we have linguistic symbols, we have math symbols, we have all these things – not one of them is the product of a single mind. These are things that were invented collaboratively at the moment or else over time as individuals build on one another’s accomplishments.” Great apes and other creatures – ants and bees do offer a limited counter-example -- don’t do that. Understanding this evolved capacity – Tomasello doesn’t like using terms like “hard-wired” or “innate” – isn’t just a matter for academic interest. While he shied away from talking about the normative implications of his research and theories, Tomasello noted the benefits of cooperation and collaboration (and also some of its less-welcome artefacts such as creating out-groups to discriminate against), whether in sports, or work, or society. While he wouldn’t develop public policies, “If you want a more cooperative society, I can tell you some things that would help.”
24 min
The Interchange
The Interchange
Greentech Media
Is 'Too Much' Wind and Solar a Good Thing?
We are going to build a lot more wind and solar over the coming decades. It will inevitably lead to oversupply of these resources on the grid. But is that a good thing? That’s the focus of this week’s show, featuring a conversation between Shayle Kann and Columbia University's Melissa Lott. The stars have aligned for a rare win-win-win situation: Solar and wind are popular with politicians; they’re popular with customers; and they’re often the lowest-cost resource, making them an attractive bet for investors. As we build more solar and wind, many regions will start to look like California does on a sunny spring day, or like West Texas does on a windy night: power prices drop to zero or below, producers curtail excess electricity, creating the dreaded "overproduction” of renewables. So what do we do with all this carbon-free power? We asked Melissa Lott and it turns out quite a lot! She argues that renewable oversupply can actually be a feature of the grid, not a bug (even if it causes some minor pests along the way). There are all kinds of new resources we can harness with excess wind and solar.  Melissa is a Senior Research Scholar at Columbia Center on Global Energy Policy and she and her colleague, Julio Friedman, wrote a paper laying out the case for intentionally overbuilding capacity — and thus intentionally creating oversupply. They lay out a framework for figuring out what to do with intermittent excess energy and zoom in on a case study in New Zealand. What happens when an aluminum smelter — one that uses a whopping 12% of the county’s annual demand and is powered largely by hydroelectric power — closes down? It was one decarbonization modeler’s dream.  The Interchange is brought to you by the Yale Program in Financing and Deploying Clean Energy. Through this online program, Yale University is training working professionals in clean energy policy, finance, and technology, accelerating the deployment of clean energy worldwide, and mitigating climate change. To connect with Yale expertise, grow your professional network, and deepen your impact, apply before March 14, 2021.
37 min
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