Latina to Latina
Latina to Latina
Jan 7, 2019
Why Brooklyn Nine-Nine’s Stephanie Beatriz Bends the Rules
24 min

Here’s the thing about Stephanie Beatriz: she doesn’t fall for traditional messages. Growing up in Texas, blond contest queens reigned, but she understood there was more to beauty. Catholic church told her being bisexual was a sin, but she knew there was nothing wrong with her. Hollywood tried to convince her there’s only ever room for one Latina, but she flatly ignored them. And now she’s living her dreams as a television star, newlywed, and outspoken LGBTQ advocate.

Follow Stephanie on Twitter @iamstephbeatz and IG @stephaniebeatriz. If you loved this episode, listen to Mishel Prada, Gina Torres and Aimee Carrero. Show your love and become a Latina to Latina Patreon supporter!

Latinos Who Lunch
Latinos Who Lunch
Latinos Who Lunch
Episode 180: The Mexican Legacy of El Zorro
In this episode, Babelito interviews Stephen Andes, a professor from Louisianna State University (LSU) and author of Zorro's Shadow: How a Mexican Legend Became America's First Superhero. They talk about this character's Mexican legacy and how Hollywood whitewashed him into a Spanish Latin lover. But before, Favy and Babelito talk about their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and their post-election blues. As always, send your questions to AskLWLpod@gmail.com and we may read them on a future episode. #podsincolor #supportbrownpodcasts #supportlatinxpodcasts #lwlpod #latinx Show Notes: Stephen Andes (https://www.lsu.edu/hss/history/people/faculty/andes.php) The Head of Joaquin Murrieta (https://www.kcet.org/shows/head-of-joaquin-murrieta/episodes/the-head-of-joaquin-murrieta) Borderless Film Festival (https://tarheels.live/borderlesscultures/) Cavalierhousebooks.com (https://www.cavalierhousebooks.com/book/9781641602938) Zorrosghost.com (https://zorrosghost.com/author/stephenandes/) Redstick Reads (https://redstickreads.com/) Rubio (https://rubiomusic.bandcamp.com/album/mango-negro) Swatch of Horrors (https://www.stitcher.com/show/swatch-of-horrors/episode/ep-1-nail-salon-horrors-76884480) Call now and leave a voicemail: (512) 333-0471 Thank you to all of our supporters on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/latinoswholunch) and Paypal (http://www.latinoswholunch.com/donate) Buy the ABCs of Latinidad Coloring book (https://thewritersblock.org/?q=h.tviewer&qsb=keyword&qse=ZzjQjUtIw2ckZaqLBU_Zqg&using_sb=status)
1 hr 32 min
FriendsLikeUs
FriendsLikeUs
Friends Like Us
The Democratic Divide
Lindsey Boylan is a public servant, a former government official, and mom to her 6-year-old daughter. Lindsey most recently ran for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. House of Representatives, in New York's 10th district in the 2020 elections. Lindsey previously served as Deputy Secretary for Economic Development and Housing, as well as Special Advisor to NY Governor Andrew Cuomo. Her portfolio of oversight included Empire State Development (ESD), the state’s chief economic development agency, for which she previously served as Chief of Staff and Executive Vice President. During her time in government, Lindsey secured hundreds of millions of dollars for underfunded public housing, led the state's efforts to provide assistance for the people of Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria, and pushed to enact a $15 minimum wage and Paid Family Leave for New Yorkers. She received her degree from Wellesley and an MBA from Columbia. Lindsey is currently a full-time democratic candidate running for Manhattan Borough President. Her platform includes solutions for issues regarding the extreme inequality her borough is facing, a bold plan to increase affordable housing, and support for expanded open spaces to make Manhattan more secure, vibrant, and livable. Check out https://lindseyfornewyork.com to learn more! Tremaine S. Wright is an attorney, entrepreneur, small business owner and activist who is a second-generation Bedford Stuyvesant resident invested in preserving the rich legacy of her community and building a strong foundation for the future. Tremaine was elected to the New York State Assembly on November 8, 2016. She serves the 56th Assembly District of Brooklyn, NY which represents the Bedford-Stuyvesant and Northern Crown Heights neighborhoods. She is Chair of New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic & Asian Legislative Caucus and Chair of the Assembly Subcommittee on Foster Care. She is a graduate of Duke University and the University of Chicago Law School. She has practiced law at Brooklyn Legal Services and private law firms. While working as an attorney at major law firms, Tremaine served as a pro bono lawyer for the Volunteers of Legal Services’ Incarcerated Mothers Project. Through this project, Tremaine advised mothers regarding their parental rights to protect their families. As a volunteer with the City Bar Association’s Neighborhood Entrepreneur Law Project (NELP), Tremaine assisted small business owners and organized the Tompkins Avenue Merchants Association (TAMA). Tremaine also owned and operated Common Grounds: a Neighborhood Coffee House from March 2006 to September 2015. Tremaine realized that her neighborhood lacked an adequate number of eateries and gathering places. Her vision for that space gave birth to Common Grounds A Neighborhood Coffee House with an innovative prize winning business plan lauded by the Brooklyn Public Library. She set out to create a place that would answer that need as well as foster community, provide economic opportunity and enhance commercial activity. Common Grounds did it – it employed local talent, provided stability on a block that was riddled with illicit commerce and provided a place for various segments of our community to intersect and connect. The greatest success of Common Grounds is the impact it has had on the lives of the people who came through its doors in need, and departed full and encouraged. Common Grounds created tangible change in individuals, as well as in community economics. As a Safe Space, Common Grounds was widely recognized as a partner in community empowerment and social justice. As the former Chairwoman of Community Board 3, Tremaine fostered longstanding relationships with past and current elected officials, community leaders and a cross section of local residents committed to improving Central Brooklyn. She has served on CB3 for 13 years and previously held positions as the Executive Secretary, Treasurer and Budget Coordinator. Tremaine still lives on the same block where her grandparents raised their family. She has dedicated her career to empowering and creating opportunities for her neighbors and her community. C. Zawadi Morris is an award-winning journalist and a Chicago native who moved to Brooklyn in 1997. Ms. Morris holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration (and a minor in Spanish) from the University of Illinois and a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. She has worked as the communications director for Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez (NY-12), a senior account executive for Shandwick Public Affairs and Cohn & Wolf Public Relations, and an editor of Bed-Stuy Patch. In 2013, Ms. Morris launched The Brooklyn Reader, an online news source covering the neighborhoods of Central Brooklyn, and in 2020, she launched its non-profit sister site Scriibe.org, a collaborative news source for investigative local journalism. Ms. Morris is also the executive producer of The COVID-19 Writers Project. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf
2 hr 4 min
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check
5: It’s Time America Abolished Poverty
There are a lot of jobs we as a country don’t value. Think farm work, child care, service jobs—these low-wage, often racialized and gendered jobs form the backbone of our economy, but if you’ve worked in any of these fields, you know how hard it can be to make ends meet on these jobs. Three of Dorian Warren’s grandparents were janitors, another job that doesn’t get its due. But they were also proud members of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), and through their work and their union they learned a vital lesson. If we want to improve working conditions for these undervalued jobs, you can either upgrade the workers, or you can upgrade the jobs—or you can do both. Upgrading and transforming jobs, especially dangerous and poverty-level jobs in growing sectors like care work (https://www.thenation.com/article/society/coronavirus-child-care-nurses-essential/) , is a critically important strategy precisely because of the historically devalued nature of this labor. But it takes power—the collective power of workers joining together with communities—to redesign the system of bad, poverty-level jobs into good jobs. On this week’s show, Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren follow up on last week’s episode (https://www.thenation.com/podcast/society/poverty-inequality-basic-income/) to answer the question: How can we eradicate poverty in America? It's not just about jobs, and the answers are common sense, but radical: To end poverty, we need to meet people’s real needs, like food, or diapers, or childcare, but we also need to disrupt and reform the systems that keep people in poverty, and we need to give people the power to smash through the structures holding them back. For insight on how to get to a poverty-free America, Melissa and Dorian turn to experts leading campaigns and organizations fighting against the system of poverty. Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis (https://www.thenation.com/article/society/we-still-live-in-two-americas-not-one/) , co-director of the Kairos Center and national co-director of the Poor People’s Campaign, joins to discuss how abolishing poverty is a moral imperative—and it makes good policy sense as well, leading to stronger organizing possibilities for all working Americans. Next up, Mary Kay Henry (https://www.seiu.org/mary-kay-henry) , President of SEIU, joins to talk about the role of multi-racial worker power in disrupting the system of poverty. Henry talks to Melissa and Dorian in-depth about the innovative “Fight for $15 and a Union” campaign SEIU helped launched in 2012, and the transformative power of workers setting the terms of their own fights. We then check-in with—and give the final word to—two guests on the ground in North Carolina doing the work to fulfill the immediate needs of those living in poverty and struggling to make ends meet. We talk to Eric Aft, CEO of the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest North Carolina (https://www.secondharvestnwnc.org/about-us) , who talks to us about “feeding the line and shortening the line” for the over 200,000 individuals his organization and its partners serve yearly. And Melissa and Dorian talk with Michelle Old, Executive Director of the North Carolina Diaper Bank, (https://ncdiaperbank.org/about-us) about how having access to diapers and what she calls “dignity items” is a vital necessity for babies, children and families to thrive. System Checklist  During the Covid-19 pandemic millions of Americans have fallen more deeply into poverty. Alleviating poverty in America requires political will, investment, and a strategy to win. During the past two weeks our System Check guests have identified two key issues that keep people poor: lack of cash and lack of power. This week’s System Checklist highlights a political agenda that addresses both. Raise the minimum wage. The last time Congress raised the federal minimum wage was 2007! We know that this meager $7.25 / hour minimum hasn't kept pace with cost of living. (https://www.commondreams.org/views/2020/01/21/if-worker-pay-had-kept-pace-productivity-gains-1968-todays-minimum-wage-would-be-24) Right now there is nowhere in the country where a full time, minimum wage worker can afford rent on a two bedroom apartment. We must raise the minimum wage. Join the Fight for 15. (https://fightfor15.org) Universal Health Care. Unexpected medical bills cause 40% of individual bankruptcies. (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/11/this-is-the-real-reason-most-americans-file-for-bankruptcy.html) Universal health care acknowledges that healthcare is a basic, human right and unlinks health and wealth. With access to affordable, available health care, families can spend their income on housing, food, and other necessities, while avoiding the medical bill caused spiral into poverty. Join the majority of Americans (https://www.kff.org/slideshow/public-opinion-on-single-payer-national-health-plans-and-expanding-access-to-medicare-coverage/) --support universal health care. Universal Childcare. One year of child care costs more than one year of tuition at most states’ four-year public colleges. (https://www.epi.org/child-care-costs-in-the-united-states/) Families need safe, accessible, affordable child care. We can alleviate poverty and change the trajectory of life for millions of American children with a substantial investment in childcare and early childhood education. Read this report from The Economic Policy Institute calling for “An Ambitious National Investment in America’s Children” (https://www.epi.org/publication/its-time-for-an-ambitious-national-investment-in-americas-children/) and sign up to join Childcare Changemakers (https://www.childcarechangemakers.org/) to enlist in the campaign for universal and equitable childcare for all families. Guaranteed Basic Income. Last week we heard from Aisha Nyandoro as she described the ways guaranteed basic income from The Magnolia’s Mother’s Trust (http://springboardto.org/index.php/blog/story/introducing-the-magnolia-mothers-trust) has affected the lives of Black mothers living in poverty in Mississippi. A Stockton, California, guaranteed income program (https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-06-02/stockton-extends-its-universal-basic-income-pilot) has also ignited the interest around the country. If lack of cash is the core feature of poverty, then let’s get cash to the people. Learn about and support the work of the Economic Security Project.  (https://www.economicsecurityproject.org) Ensure Workers’ Right to Organize. Workers must have the right to organize in order to have a seat at the table of power. The power to negotiate wages and conditions of work is tied directly to the ability to organize and unionize. It’s time to update our outdated labor laws to adapt to our 21st century economy. Check out the campaigns of Jobs with Justice (https://www.jwj.org/) and Sign the Pledge (https://actionnetwork.org/forms/sign-the-jobs-with-justice-pledge?&source=NAT_W_homepage) to advance workers’ rights to organize. As always, we welcome your additions to our Checklist! Use our Twitter and Facebook pages to add your comments, suggested actions, and organizations to support. System Check is a project of The Nation magazine, hosted by Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren and produced by Sophia Steinert-Evoy. Support for System Check comes from Omidyar Network, a social change venture that is reimagining how capitalism should work. Learn more about their efforts to recenter our economy around individuals, community, and societal well-being at Omidyar.com (http://omidyar.com/) . Our executive producer is Frank Reynolds. Our theme music is by Brooklyn-based artist and producer Jachary (https://jachary.bandcamp.com/) . Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: http://thenation.com/podcastsubscribe.
40 min
When In Romance
When In Romance
Book Riot
E72: It’s Gonna Be Sexy
It’s recommendation request time – part 2! Jess and Trisha offer recs to readers looking for comedic romance, underrepresented authors, cruelty-free paranormal romance, and more. Subscribe to the podcast via RSS, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher. To get even more romance recs and news, sign up for our Kissing Books newsletter! Books Discussed Polaris Rising by Jesse Mihalik The Blacksmith Queen by G.A. Aiken Highland Dragon Warrior by Isabel Cooper The Rebel Wears Plaid by Eliza Knight Agnes Moor’s Wild Knight by Alyssa Cole The Winter Sea and The Firebird by Susanna Kearsley Being Hospitable by Meka James Heartbeat Braves by Pamela Sanderson Taking on the Billionaire by Robin Covington Second Chance on Cypress Lane by Reese Ryan The Bromance Book Club by Lyssa Kay Adams The Love Study by Kris Ripper Between a Rock and a Hot Mess by Phyllis Bourne The Duke Who Didn’t by Courtney Milan Truth or Beard by Penny Reid Ghosting by Tash Skilton Mangoes and Mistletoe by Adriana Herrera Stripped by Zoey Castile The Baldwin Village and Holidays with the Wongs series by Jackie Lau The Sumage Solution by G.L. Carriger Deal with the Devil by Kit Rocha The Last Wolf by Maria Vale Hot and Badgered by Shelly Laurenston The Demigod’s Legacy and Prince in Leather by Holley Trent Comedic Romances Discussed This Year Get a Life, Chloe Brown and Take a Hint, Dani Brown by Talia Hibbert The Roommate by Rosie Danan You Had Me at Hola by Alexis Daria The Worst Best Man by Mia Sosa Boyfriend Material by Alexis Hall The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang Meet Cute Club by Jack Harbon Conventionally Yours by Annabeth Albert Do You Want To Start a Scandal? by Tess Dare Fumbled by Alexa Martin Thanks to everyone who wrote in with recommendation requests, and always feel free to send us your thoughts and questions! As always, you can find Jess and Trisha at the WIR email address (wheninromance@bookriot.com). You can also find us on Twitter (@jessisreading and @trishahaleybrwn), or Instagram (@jess_is_reading and @trishahaleybrown). See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1 hr 4 min
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