TGC Podcast
TGC Podcast
Nov 20, 2020
Mohler on Why Young Christians Should Prioritize Institutions
Play • 50 min

Al Mohler delivered a message in a breakout session at TGC’s 2019 National Conference titled “Why Younger Generations Should Invest in Institutions.” Culture in general, he argued, is moving toward an anti-institutional future as generations who do not value institutions grow older. They prefer movements to shape their identity rather than institutions. But institutions are the control centers of societies, culture is produced by institutions, and there is no civilization without institutions. Movements that do not eventually institutionalize fade away, as they lack the lasting stewardship necessary to survive. Christianity is no different. A walk through the scriptures reveals that Israel and the church are defined in institutional terms, and we must embrace those institutional realities in order to preserve and build our great faith.

This episode of TGC Podcast is brought to you by Operation Christmas Child. National Collection Week is November 16th through 23rd. Visit SamaritansPurse.org/occ to learn how gift-filled shoeboxes will result in evangelism and discipleship for millions of children this year.

Help Me Teach The Bible
Help Me Teach The Bible
The Gospel Coalition, Nancy Guthrie
Dan Doriani on James (Re-release)
To teach us how to teach the book of James, Nancy Guthrie talked with Dan Doriani, vice president of strategic academic initiatives and professor of theology at Covenant Theological Seminary in St. Louis. Doriani is the author of _Getting the Message: A Plan for Interpreting and Applying the Bible_, a book that is essential reading for every Bible teacher, as well as numerous commentaries. He also wrote the introduction and notes on the book of James in the _Gospel Transformation Bible_. Topics in this discussion include: * the way Jesus is presented differently in James compared to other epistles * the tree tests of James * the nature of “true religion” * the gospel according to James * bringing a social justice framework to teaching James * whether there’s conflict between James and Paul regarding faith and works * praying for healing according to James Here are some additional resources you may find helpful in preparing to teach James: * Doriani’s class lectures on James at Covenant Theological Seminary (registration required) * Sermons on James by Alistair Begg * Sermons on James by Dick Lucas * Let’s Get Real! sermon series by various teachers at All Souls, Langham Place For further study, here are some books you may find helpful, including titles from Crossway, the sponsor of Help Me Teach the Bible: * _James _(Reformed Expository Commentary) by Dan Doriani * _The Letter of James _(Pillar New Testament Commentary) Douglas J. Moo * _James: Faith that Works_ (Preaching the Word Commentary) by R. Kent Hughes * _James: a 12-Week Study_ by Greg Gilbert
1 hr 4 min
Knowing Faith
Knowing Faith
Training The Church
#98 – The Mega Q&A Episode
We go over the following questions: * When you say that we’re asking Genesis questions that it’s not asking itself...is that literal? How would I apply that to other books of the Bible? * How would you describe/define the imago dei in light of disability? * Who’s your favorite person to talk theology with other than each other? * New ESV translation of Genesis 3:16? * When was the promise of the land fulfilled in the Abrahamic Covenant? Was it fulfilled during David or Solomon’s reign? * If God is the one who gives faith, and He wishes that none should perish-why doesn’t He give the gift of faith to everyone? * How do you strike a balance between reading the Bible and Christian books or books about the bible? * When is it ok to leave a church? * What are some practical tips for starting a theological program for women at your church? * What did you think about the West Wing reunion? * Could you explain the doctrine of the sufficiency of scripture? * What are your favorite hymns? * Do you think God made another world before this one? * What is discipleship and how/where does discipleship happen? What does it mean to make disciples? * Is doubt a sin? * What advice do you give to someone just starting out as pastor? * If you could have a table discussion with any 3 theologians, past or present, who would be at your table? Don't forget to support the show and have access to merch, monthly newsletters, behind-the-scenes, and more at Patreon.com/KnowingFaith Follow us on social media on Instagram @knowingfaithpodcast, Twitter @KnowingFaithPod, and on Facebook at Knowing Faith.
1 hr 1 min
Gospelbound
Gospelbound
The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen
Russell Moore: How to Stand When the World Is Falling
If I want to read anyone’s reflections on recent years, it’s Russell Moore. The president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the SBC hasn’t been as visible or vocal as he was before 2017, at least until the last week following the attack on the U.S. Capitol. But his newest book, _The Courage to Stand: Facing Your Fear Without Losing Your Soul_, published by B&H, is even better than a tell-all memoir. It’s a grace-infused reflection on where and how to stand tall when it feels like the world is going to crush you. Moore says, “The courage to stand is the courage to be crucified.” Indeed, Jesus sets the tone for this book. And if you’re going to worship and follow a Savior who submitted to the cross, you’re not going to follow the world’s typical mode of courage. I see this book as seeking to reclaim Jesus, or at least his reputation and authority, among evangelicals. Moore observes, “An entire generation is watching what goes on under the name of American religion, wondering if there is something real to it, or if it is just another useful tool to herd people, to elect allies, to make money.” Elsewhere he writes, “I’m not surprised now when I see Jesus used as a mascot to prop up some identity politics or power agenda, or even to cover up private immorality or public injustice.” We’ve seen that recently with the Jericho March, and then the protests-turned-attack at the Capitol. Moore joins me on Gospelbound to tell us what scares him, how to lead when no one seems to be following, ambition masquerading as conviction, and much more. This episode of Gospelbound is sponsored by The Good Book Company, publisher of _Meals with Jesus _by Ed Drew. These simple 10-minute family devotions in Luke’s Gospel explore Jesus’ character through nine meals that he shared with people. More information at thegoodbook.com.
50 min
As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
What’s at Stake?: Gospel Opportunities and Implications
In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Mike Aitcheson welcome Soong Chan-Rah to discuss reclaiming the church from cultural captivity and the specific ways that Western attitudes of individualism have crept into our modern ministry philosophies. Rah shares insights regarding the ethics of the kingdom and paints a picture of hopes and dreams for the future. Rah focuses on the positive gospel opportunities in addressing race and justice with kingdom ethics. * An introduction to Soong Chan-Rah (:58) * Cultural shifts in objections to the gospel (2:54) * The significance of minority leadership in this shift (9:43) * The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church From Western Cultural Captivity (13:27) * “Captivity” in the conversation (17:11) * Advice for church leadership in these conversations (21:14) * “Aren’t we pas this now?” (28:10) * How important it is for the church to get this cultural moment right (33:55) * What happens when churches dismiss these cultural conversations (37:59) * The church’s two minute drill (42:44) * Hopeful realism (49:21) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * What are some biblical truths that the church stands by that you see the church as failing to live into? * What does it mean that we should embrace “the full biblical narrative”? In the arc of that narrative, which parts of the narrative do you see yourself latching on to more easily? * What are ways that the church has gone into “captivity” to western values? What are ways you have seen this in our bible reading? In our community life? In Christian engagements with social issues? * What are ways that we can remember the sins of our past corporately in regard to how the church has engaged with minority racial groups? What gospel hope does Jesus offer in our remembering? * What are your hopes for the future of the Western Church? How do you hope to see the church embrace values that are biblical, rather than cultural? What would that look like for your local church?
53 min
Read the Bible
Read the Bible
The Gospel Coalition, D. A. Carson
January 19 – Vol. 2
Crowd psychology is easily explained after the fact, but difficult to predict. I recall at a raucous campus election at McGill University thirty-five years ago, one student heckler made a couple of telling points that embarrassed the candidate in question. The crowd was instantly on his side, cheering him on. Thus emboldened, he attempted another sally, but this one was anemic and pointless. The candidate looked at him disdainfully and asked, “Is there some point you are trying to make?” Unable to reply with a quick and direct barb, the student immediately found the crowd hissing and booing him and telling him to shut up and sit down. In two minutes the crowd had turned from avid support to dismissive scorn. It was easy enough to analyze after the fact; it was difficult to predict. Demetrius the silversmith learned this lesson the hard way (Acts 19:23–41). In the face of Paul’s effective evangelism, and therefore the threat of a diminution of his business as an artisan producing silver figurines of the goddess Artemis (her Latin name was Diana), Demetrius tries to stir up enough opposition to stop the Christian movement. Planned or otherwise, the result is a full-fledged riot. Paul sees this as a glorious opportunity to articulate the Gospel to a huge crowd; his friends, however, see this crowd as so dangerous that they succeed, with whatever difficulty, in persuading him to stay away. Eventually the “city clerk” (more or less equivalent to a mayor) quiets the crowd. Ephesus is a free city; it is trusted by Rome to govern itself and remain loyal to the empire. The city clerk well knows that reports of riots in Ephesus could prompt an inquiry that might result in a change of status. Roman troops could be imposed and a governor commissioned by either the senate or the emperor himself. The Christians, says the mayor, are not guilty of desecrating the temple of Artemis. So why the riot? If Demetrius and his friends have a grievance, there are courts, or they can await the calling of the next properly constituted city “assembly” (Acts 19:39—interestingly, the word is _ekklesia_, from which we derive “church”). So the city clerk quells the crowd and dismisses it. Some of the lessons are obvious. (1) It is usually very foolish to whip up a crowd. The results are unpredictable. (2) God remains in charge. Despite some desperate moments, the results in this case are wonderful: the Christian cause has been exonerated, Demetrius and his cronies have lost face, no one has suffered harm. (3) God can use strange economic and political pressures, including, in this case, a pagan artisan and a mayor, to bring about his good purposes. _This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan._
3 min
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