Marc Elias Saves Democracy, One Court Victory At A Time
Play • 38 min

Our guest this week is Marc Elias. Marc is an election law attorney who has been at the forefront of protecting voting rights and stopping political interference in elections. Marc is also the founder of Democracy Docket, a website and newsletter that highlights voter suppression efforts and his actions to stop them from taking effect.

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Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America
Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America
Ben & Jerry's and Vox Creative
Revisiting Reparations
In 1865, General William T. Sherman issued Special Field Order No. 15— a promise to redistribute 40 acres of once Confederate-owned land in coastal South Carolina and Florida to each formerly enslaved adult to begin mending the seemingly unmendable. It never came to pass. H.R. 40, also known as the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act, has been brought to Congress repeatedly since 1989, first by the late Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich), now by Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Tex). Hear Jeffery Robinson, founder of the Who We Are Project and deputy director of the ACLU take on the past, present and future of reparations with veteran political activist Dr. Ron Daniels and legal expert and reparations advocate Nkechi Taifa. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Baldwin, James. The Fire Next Time. Vintage, 1992 Coates, Ta-Nehisi. “The Case for Reparations.” The Atlantic. June, 2014. Du Bois, W.E.B. Black Reconstruction in America 1860 - 1880. Free Press, 1999 Foner, Eric. Reconstruction: America’s Unfinished Revolution, 1863 - 1877. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2014. H.R.40 - Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act Lockhart, P.R. The 2020 Democratic Primary Debate Over Reparations, Explained. Vox.com, June 19, 2019 Marable, Manning. Beyond Boundaries: The Manning Marable Reader. Routledge, 2011. National African American Reparations Commission (NAARC) 10-Point Reparations Plan Taifa, Nkechi. Black Power, Black Lawyer. House of Songhay II, 2020.
33 min
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
The Nation Magazine
10: Political Violence Is No Anomaly in American History
Georgia made history this week: The state elected a Black Senator on Tuesday for the first time ever. Rev. Raphael Warnock, a Morehouse graduate who serves as senior pastor of the storied Ebenezer Baptist Church once pastored by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., will be representing Georgia in the Senate as soon as the results are certified. Along with the win of his fellow Georgian, Jon Ossoff, the Senate will effectively be in Democratic hands, as will the House and the Presidency. Sadly, a different kind of history was also made this week, when an angry, violent, mob of mostly white Trump supporters broke into the Capitol on Wednesday, smashing windows, destroying private offices and violating public spaces. With encouragement from the man occupying the highest office in the land, the mob forced our elected representatives to flee the House and Senate floors as they were undertaking the constitutionally mandated certification of the 2020 presidential election. The people who perpetrated this attack against our democracy were fueled by misinformation, much of it coming from the President himself: That dead people had voted, that voting machines had somehow switched votes, that the election was rigged and widespread fraud had handed Biden the presidency. But they were also acting on another kind of misinformation, another kind of lie—a lie that erases the genius and the contributions of Black people, a lie that ignores the fact that it was Black hands that made America what it is, that unpaid Black labor built the very buildings that serve as the seat of our democracy (https://www.aoc.gov/explore-capitol-campus/art/slave-labor-commemorative-marker) . They were fueled by the lie that is white supremacy. If we are to move beyond the gridlock that has been our political fate for years, we need to face up to this lie embedded deep within our entire public life. On this week’s show, your hosts Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren undertake a system check of the very foundation of our politics. Our guest and guide this week is Hasan Kwame Jeffries, associate professor of history at The Ohio State University where he teaches courses on the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. He reminds us that the violence we saw at the Capitol this week is not an anomaly—in fact, political violence is what birthed this nation. The American Revolution, the Civil War, the brutal suppression of Reconstruction and the stiff resistance to the Civil Rights Movement, political violence has long been used to perpetuate white supremacy in this country. And too often, Black agency and emancipation has been bartered away to avoid further political violence. But Prof. Jeffries points us toward a way to hold people—whether they’re the people who stormed the Capitol or the politicians who egged them on—accountable for their political violence, and a way to recognizing and honoring the full contributions that Black Americans have made to our republic. Our final word this week goes to Professor Blair Kelley, Associate Professor of History at North Carolina State University. System Check listeners will remember Prof. Kelley from episode 2, in which she gave us a deeply personal perspective on voter suppression (https://www.thenation.com/podcast/politics/voting-election-electoral-college/) —this week, she reminds us of all the working class Black folks who have asserted their right to participate in a political system that more often than not thwarted and devalued their input. It is our task to honor their legacy. System Checklist Transforming analysis into action, the System Check Team gives listeners three action items this week: Take Action: The politicians who aided and abetted this week’s assault on democracy must be held accountable. Prof. Hasan Kwame Jeffries’s brother, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (https://twitter.com/RepJeffries/status/1347245549188239360?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet) , is one of a chorus of politicians who came out today demanding President Trump’s removal from office. Add your name as a co-signer of Rep. Cori Bush’s bill to investigate and expel members of congress who fomented the storming of the Capitol (https://gopcoup.com/) , and help shift the balance of power in the Senate, that most unequal of institutions, by telling your representatives to make Washington, DC the 51st state (https://statehood.dc.gov/page/contact-congress#/3/) . Get Informed: How do we fight misinformation? By educating ourselves. This week’s political violence didn’t come out of nowhere (https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/proud-boys-capitol/) , it’s a clear response to the progressive political gains made this year, facilitated by the work of Black women from Stacey Abrams all the way back to Fannie Lour Hamer (https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/black-women-voting-rights/) . Check out Prof. Jeffries’s moving TedTalk (https://www.ted.com/talks/hasan_kwame_jeffries_why_we_must_confront_the_painful_parts_of_us_history/transcript?language=en#t-95967) , mentioned in today’s show. Listen to Rev. Raphael Warnock’s speech (https://www.11alive.com/article/news/politics/elections/raphael-warnock-georgia-senate-runoff-statement/507-43edf954-2b32-4730-a035-fde09b50f2b5) after his defeat of Sen. Kelly Loeffler to learn how the son of a woman who picked someone else’s cotton could become a US Senator. Watch: And while you’re at it, treat yourself to Elizabeth Alexander’s full reading of “Praise Song for the Day” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vLBnFk-OFc) at the 2009 inauguration of Barack Obama. As always, we welcome your additions to our Checklist! Use our Twitter (https://twitter.com/SystemCheckPod) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/SystemCheckPod/) pages to add your comments, suggested actions, and organizations to support. And if you like the show, subscribe on Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/system-check/id1536830138) , Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/0vI1wNUVfYbZXMIM6nciaX?si=VoRgIzndRVG4Xw_rQNGKmQ) , or wherever you get your podcasts for new episodes every Friday. System Check is a project of The Nation magazine, hosted by Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren and produced by Sophia Steinert-Evoy. Support for System Check comes from Omidyar Network, a social change venture that is reimagining how capitalism should work. Learn more about their efforts to recenter our economy around individuals, community, and societal well-being at Omidyar.com (http://omidyar.com/) . Our executive producer is Frank Reynolds. Our theme music is by Brooklyn-based artist and producer Jachary (https://jachary.bandcamp.com/) . Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: http://thenation.com/systemchecksubs.
35 min
Politicon: How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along with Clay Aiken
Politicon: How The Heck Are We Gonna Get Along with Clay Aiken
Politicon
52: Rep. David Price
Clay has run for congress in North Carolina and almost unseated the Republican incumbent-- and he remains engaged in the state’s politics to this day.  So for this special 52nd episode, Clay marks 1 year of podcasting by welcoming his hometown representative, Congressman  David Price (https://twitter.com/RepDavidEPrice) to discuss the future of bi-partisanship, the Democratic majority, what it takes to get and stay elected, and how to best represent your constituents. Guest: Rep. David Price Representative David Price (https://twitter.com/RepDavidEPrice) represents North Carolina's Fourth District  -- a rapidly growing, research-and-education-focused district that includes Durham, Franklin, Granville and Orange counties as well as parts of Chatham, Wake, and Vance counties. He received his undergraduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill and went on to Yale University to earn a Bachelor of Divinity and Ph.D. in Political Science. Before he began serving in Congress in 1987, Price was a professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University. He is the author of four books on Congress and the American political system. Price currently serves on the House Appropriations Committee and is the Chairman of the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Subcommittee. He also serves on the House Budget Committee and is a member of the Appropriations subcommittees on homeland security, State Department, and foreign operations. He is a recognized leader in foreign policy, serving as the Chairman of the House Democracy Partnership, which he initiated to help strengthen parliaments in emerging democracies. In North Carolina, David's constituents know him as a strong supporter of education, accessible health care, affordable housing, clean air and water, and improved transportation alternatives. David is a native of Erwin, Tennessee. He and his wife Lisa live in Chapel Hill and are parents of two children and three grandchildren. Get more from Rep. David Price with: Twitter (https://twitter.com/RepDavidEPrice) | House.Gov (https://price.house.gov/) | Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/RepDavidEPrice/) | Host: Clay Aiken (https://twitter.com/clayaiken) has sold 6 million albums, authored a New York Times bestseller, and ran for Congress in North Carolina in 2014 almost unseating a popular Republican incumbent. Follow Clay Aiken further on: Twitter (https://twitter.com/clayaiken?lang=en)   | Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/clayaiken/) | Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/clayaiken) Email your questions to podcasts@politicon.com (mailto:podcasts@politicon.com) FOLLOW @POLITICON (https://twitter.com/Politicon) AND GO TO POLITICON.COM (https://politicon.com/) THIS WEEK’S SPONSORS: HELLO FRESH  GO TO WWW.HELLOFRESH.COM/10HECK (http://www.hellofresh.com/10heck) AND USE CODE 10HECK FOR 10 FREE MEALS, INCLUDING FREE SHIPPING! APOSTROPHE  GET FIFTEEN DOLLARS OFF YOUR FIRST VISIT WITH A BOARD-CERTIFIED DERMATOLOGIST AT www.APOSTROPHE.COM/HECK (http://www.apostrophe.com/HECK) AND USE OUR CODE: HECK.
1 hr 7 min
Our Body Politic
Our Body Politic
Lantigua Williams & Co.
February 19, 2021: Examining a provocative way to build Black voting power, why Covid-19 vaccination must be a global effort, and facing up to the limits of inclusion at the Golden Globes.
This week, Farai Chideya talks to Charles Blow, New York Times opinion columnist and author of “The Devil You Know: A Black Power Manifesto,” about his proposal for building Black political power in the South. Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University explains why vaccinating against Covid-19 must be a global effort, and Dr. Debra Furr-Holden of Michigan State University says getting Black Americans vaccinated is a key part of that effort. Our business of entertainment contributor Casey Mendoza breaks down who was nominated, who was snubbed, and who might be miscategorized at the Golden Globes. And political roundtable regulars Errin Haines and Jess Morales Rocketto explain why it’s important to keep trying to hold former President Trump accountable for his actions, despite his acquittal by the Senate. EPISODE RUNDOWN 0:55 Writer and columnist Charles Blow explains how moving en masse can change the political dynamics of a state. 7:04 A central argument in his book, Blow dispels the myth that racism only exists in the South. 10:34 Blow says that because of implicit bias, multi-racial coalitions can be limiting for building Black power. 14:16 Dr. Ashish Jha explains how herd immunity works in the vaccination process. 16:26 Dr. Jha says there is promising research that current vaccines can fight against most variants of Covid-19. 17:54 Dr. Jha says that vaccination efforts must be global in order to eliminate the threat of Covid-19 variants that prolong the pandemic. 19:58 Casey Mendoza looks at past controversies addressing the lack of diversity in entertainment awards shows. 22:38 Mendoza reflects on the role of white creators in the conversation about diversity and inclusion in Hollywood. 24:38 Mendoza explains why the Golden Globes were highly criticized for the categorization of “Minari” as a foreign language film. 25:53 Categorizing international or foreign-language films still proves to be problematic, Mendoza explains. 30:00 Errin Haines reflects on her interview with Vice President Kamala Harris. 33:28 Farai Chideya discusses Charles Blow’s idea for obtaining Black political power with Errin Haines. 36:02 After the impeachment acquittal of former President Donald Trump, Jess Morales Rocketto says that the threat of Trump and Trumpism is still very real. 39:00 Chideya tries to make sense of the conflicting positions from Senator Mitch McConnell regarding Trump’s role in the January 6th insurrection. 41:27 Sippin’ the Political Tea’s experts discuss other ways people are trying to hold Trump accountable for the events of January 6th, and why voting to convict on an impeachment charge would have had different consequences.
48 min
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