#126 The Past, Present and Future of Policing
48 min

Since the murder of George Floyd, hundreds of protests against police misconduct have occurred across the country. People are demanding real change, right now. But let’s step back, and take the long view: has American policing improved? Even if the answer is yes, what more must police do to give all Americans the policing they deserve, equally, fairly, and free or racial bias?  


David Couper served in policing since the early 1960s, over twenty of them as a Chief of Police. He’s now a blogger, commentator and author about police.  His book, “Arrested Development,” warns about where policing in the U.S. is headed – and suggests seven steps to get it on the right track.  



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Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
pete dominick
238 Dr Ruth Ben Ghiat and Comedian and Writer Judy Gold
Ruth Ben-Ghiat is a historian and commentator on fascism, authoritarian leaders, and propaganda — and the threats these present to democracies. As author or editor of seven books with over 100 op-eds and essays in media outlets including CNN, The New Yorker, and The Washington Post, she brings historical perspective to her analyses of current events. Her insight into the authoritarian playbook has made her an expert source for television, radio, podcasts, and online events around the globe. Ben-Ghiat is Professor of History and Italian Studies at New York University and an Advisor to Protect Democracy. She is also a historical consultant for film and television productions. She is a big fan of electronic music, which is her preferred soundtrack while writing. She practices yoga several times a week. Ben-Ghiat’s work has been supported by Fulbright, Guggenheim, and other fellowships. Her books Fascist Modernities and Italian Fascism’s Empire Cinema detail what happens to societies when authoritarian governments take hold, and explore the appeal of strongmen to collaborators and followers. Growing up in Pacific Palisades, California, where many intellectuals who fled Nazism resettled, sparked her interest in the subject. With Strongmen: From Mussolini to the Present (Norton, November 10th, 2020), which is now available she offers a blueprint for understanding and resisting authoritarianism. Judy Gold's new book YES I CAN SAY THAT! :When They Come for the Comedians We Are All in Trouble Judy has written and starred in 2 critically acclaimed, Off-Broadway hit shows: The Judy Show – My Life As A Sitcom, (Outer Critics Circle Nom) and 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother, (GLAAD Media Award – Outstanding NY Theater, Drama Desk Nom – Actor). The book with the same title based on more interviews with Jewish Mothers was nominated for the prestigious Quill Award. Judy received rave reviews as Gremio in the all female The Taming Of The Shrew for NYC’s 2016 season of The Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park. She has co-starred in the Off-Broadway productions of Clinton! The Musical, Disaster! The Musical, Love Loss & What I Wore, and The Vagina Monologues. Judy’s most recent TV appearances include guest-starring roles on Louie, Broad City, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Inside Amy Schumer, Difficult People, 30 Rock, 2 Broke Girls, Melissa & Joey, The Big C, and she is recurring on the upcoming new series on TBS Search Party. She and her family appeared on ABC’s Celebrity Wife Swap, and Judy has competed on TFN’s Rachael vs. Guy and Chopped All Stars. She appears regularly on The Steve Harvey Show and has made numerous appearances on The View, The Today Show, The Wendy Williams Show and The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore. She is an original cast member of Tru TV’s Worlds Dumbest. Judy is a frequent contributor for CNN, & MSNBC. Judy has also toured with The Moth. Judy can be seen doing stand-up regularly at NYC’s top comedy clubs including The Comedy Cellar, Carolines on Broadway and Eastville Comedy Clubs, and recently had a sold-out run at Feinstein’s 54 Below. Judy has had stand-up specials on HBO (Cable Ace Award), Comedy Central and LOGO and was twice nominated for The American Comedy Award for Funniest Female Comedian. Judy has appeared in numerous documentaries including, The Aristocrats, The Last Laugh, When Jews Were Funny. Judy’s popular weekly podcast Kill Me Now, is on CBS Network. Judy has guest written articles for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post, CNN.com, and more. She is an ambassador for The Hetrick Martin Institute, and on the board of GMHC. Judy won 2 Emmy awards for writing and producing, The Rosie O’Donnell Show. Also Check out Judy's podcast Please consider a paid subscription to this daily podcast. Everyday I will interview expert guests,usually 2 or more on a wide range of issues. I will continue to be transparent about my life, issues and vulnerabilities in hopes we can relate, connect and grow together. If you want to add something to the show email me StandUpwithPete@gmail.com Join the Stand Up Community Stand Up is also brought to you this month by GiveWell.org GiveWell is a nonprofit dedicated to finding outstanding giving opportunities and publishing the full details of our analysis to help donors decide where to give. GiveWell.org/Standup Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page
2 hr 12 min
How To Citizen with Baratunde
How To Citizen with Baratunde
iHeartRadio
To be Less Polarized, We Must Humanize (with Esther Perel)
Baratunde ends Season One focused on the state of our relationships, a key pillar of how to citizen, and thus the health of our society after the most contentious election in modern history. In conversation with world-renowned relationship expert, Esther Perel, they discuss how to repair relationships in this moment, and how choosing to listen and humanize each other is not only how to citizen, but enlightened self-interest.   Show Notes + Links We are grateful to Esther Perel for joining us! Follow her @EstherPerelOfficial on IG or @estherperel on Twitter. or find more of her work at EstherPerel.com.  We will post this episode, a transcript, show notes and more at howtocitizen.com. Please show your support for the show in the form of a review and rating. It makes a huge difference with the algorithmic overlords!  INTERNAL ACTIONS  What is your model of relationships? Were you raised to believe in self-reliance and autonomy or interdependence and loyalty? Do you conceive of yourself as an “I” trying to develop a “We” or the other way around?   Take inventory of the relationships in your life.  Identify relationships in your life that are polarized over politics. Determine which make you truly unsafe that you must let go, then focus on those where you are still committed to some level of relationship and you can still see possibility. In those relationships, make the choice to humanize the person, listen, and find common ground, no matter how small. Reflect on your own behavior and language. Can you acknowledge any responsibility for the state of the relationship?   Examine your own perspectives about people who vote differently than you.  What about your view or beliefs about “these people” makes you fearful? If these thoughts were reversed, would they sound fair or accurate to you? Can you imagine another dimension to one of them as to why they vote or behave the way they do?    EXTERNAL ACTIONS Choose to deepen one or two relationships with people who voted differently from you. Instead of ignoring how a loved one voted, practice engaging through questions, not arguments. Be curious. Remember the question from Eric Liu in Ep 2: “what are you afraid of?” and add “what do you hope for?” and “what do you care about?” Build and invest in relationships outside of politics. We need more excuses to connect with each other beyond politics. In our second episode, Eric Liu asked us to start a club, any club. Do it. If you’re already in one or more, good for you. Stay connected to others through the common interests you share. Invest in those relationships.  ------------------------------------------------------ If you take any of these actions, share that with us - action@howtocitizen.com. Mention Humanize in the subject line. And share about your citizening on social media using #howtocitizen.  SEASON BREAK NOTES Thrilled at the response. - example of quotes about the show, slack, inbox, or reviews in itunes. If you’ve enjoyed, the NUMBER ONE WAY PODCAST GROW are by word of mouth. Tell someone about the show or your favorite episode.  Thanks for riding with us this season. Here’s the news on the future of this show: There’s a future of this show! We will be making a second season and expect to release it in the first quarter of 2021.  We might drop some special episodes during this transition period for our country and our podcast, but here’s some ways to stay connected… Baratunde and show social @baratunde on socials. @howtocitizenwithbaratunde on IG 202-894-8844 “citizen” Send us email or voice memo! on what you’ve thought of season 1 and what you’d want to hear in season 2. comments@howtocitizen.com Listen back to season 1, Visit Baratunde's website to sign up for his newsletter to learn about upcoming guests, live tapings, and more. Follow him on Instagram or join his Patreon. You can even text him, like right now at 202-894-8844. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
1 hr 10 min
The Field
The Field
The New York Times
On Election Day, 'Two Different Worlds'
This episode contains strong language. At the heart of one race for the Wisconsin State Assembly are some of the same political cracks splitting the U.S. as a whole. Some believe keeping businesses running is a priority during the coronavirus pandemic; others think keeping people safe and healthy should be given precedence. Rob Swearingen is a four-time Republican assemblyman and owner of a local restaurant. He challenged the lockdown imposed by Wisconsin’s governor and, since reopening his business, has taken a loose interpretation of the mask mandate. His Democratic challenger, Kirk Bangstad, has strictly followed statewide edicts, opening his restaurant outdoors in the summer and, when there were coronavirus infections among his staff, closing down until all could be tested. What do the different approaches reveal about Wisconsin politics and about broader American divisions? Reid J. Epstein, a politics reporter for The New York Times, and Andy Mills and Luke Vander Ploeg, audio producers for The Times, went to the state to find out. Guests: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times; Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The Times; Luke Vander Ploeg, an audio producer for The Times.  Bonus Election Day special: The Daily is going LIVE today. Listen to Michael Barbaro and Carolyn Ryan, a deputy managing editor at The Times, as they call our correspondents for the latest on a history-making day.  Tune in from 4 - 8 p.m. Eastern, only on nytimes.com/thedaily and on the The New York Times iPhone app. Click here for more information.  Background reading:  * Here’s Reid’s story about how the virus has divided the conservative town of Minocqua, Wis. * President Trump and Joe Biden barnstormed through battleground states, concluding an extraordinary campaign conducted amid a health crisis and deep economic anxiety.
37 min
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