Episode 502: Luke Worsfold. Inside Addiction
Play • 35 min

Today’s episode is about taking your experience and using it to help those who’ve been impacted by trauma.


My guest today is Luke Worsfold. Luke grew up with a drug-addicted mother who died when he was 10. The experience of her death caused severe trauma throughout Luke’s life, which led to Luke’s own drug addiction. When Luke realized that he, himself, was heading towards his own death, it was in that moment that he decided to make a commitment to become the best version of myself and lead others by example.


Luke has since founded Lisa, Inside Addiction, a treatment center to help individuals with substance abuse problems. 



In This Episode



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IFS Talks
IFS Talks
Aníbal Henriques & Tisha Shull
The Therapeutic Dose of Empathy in IFS with Alexia Rothman
Dr. Alexia Rothman is a licensed psychologist and Certified IFS therapist in private practice in Atlanta, GA.  She is a United States Presidential Scholar who completed her doctoral work in Clinical Psychology in 2003 at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow.  She has formerly held adjunct professor positions in the Psychology Departments of Emory University and Agnes Scott College.  Dr. Rothman was drawn to the IFS model through her therapeutic work with trauma survivors, and she began her formal training in the IFS model in 2011.  Over the past 11 years, Dr. Rothman has served as a Program Assistant for many Level 1, 2, and 3 experiential IFS trainings.  In 2016, Dr. Rothman combined her passion for psychotherapy and her love of teaching and began offering full-day workshops to introduce the IFS model to clinicians.  She now regularly teaches both introductory and more advanced IFS workshops throughout the United States and abroad, and she serves as an IFS consultant, helping clinicians to deepen their knowledge of the IFS model while working with their own systems to facilitate maximal access to Self-energy in their professional and personal lives.  Dr. Rothman is married to an IFS therapist and is the mother of two human children and three Tonkinese cats. You can find more about Dr. Alexia at her website https://dralexiarothman.com You can find the piece on therapeutic dose of empathy in IFS at minute 23:33
49 min
Unapologetically Sensitive
Unapologetically Sensitive
Patricia Young
106 We (HSPs) Are Not Too Much, with Susan Kraker
TITLE We (HSPs) are not too much GUEST Susan Kraker EPISODE OVERVIEW Susan is a therapist who specializes in relationships, and she works with the Highly Sensitive Person. She decided to take the Online HSP Course because she didn’t have many friends who were also Highly Sensitive. We had a rupture during one of the groups, and we talk about this. Susan has some astute observations. We both talk about some common wounds we both have, and the conversation goes deep and is very vulnerable. GUEST Susan Kraker is a therapist who specializes in relationships, mid-life dating and HSP courtship. Education: New York University (NYU), Gallaudet University and the Doctoral Program in Counseling Psychology at University of Southern California (USC). Susan is originally from NY but currently resides with her husband, Pi, and two munchkin cats in Los Angeles. PODCAST HOST Patricia is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, and Coach. She knows what it’s like to feel like an outcast, misfit, and truthteller. Learning about the trait of being a Highly Sensitive Person (HSP), helped Patricia rewrite her history with a deeper understanding, appreciation, and a sense of self-compassion. She created the podcast Unapologetically Sensitive to help other HSPs know that they aren’t alone, and that being an HSP has amazing gifts, and some challenges. Patricia works online globally working individually with people, and she teaches Online Courses for HSPs that focus on understanding what it means to be an HSP, self-care, self-compassion, boundaries, perfectionism, mindfulness, communication, and creating a lifestyle that honors us LINKS Head/Heart Conversations four-part series will help participants learn about themselves as well as enhance their clinical skills -- CEUs included! The first webinar on March 5th, 2021 led by Sarah Buino is called Conversations with a Wounded Healer. It’s a call to action encouraging therapists to step into their own healing with courage. And as a special thank you to listeners, you can get $10 off your order by using the code “HSP” when you register. For more info and to register, visit https://www.tinyurl.com/HHConvos Patricia’s Links HSP Online Course--https://unapologeticallysensitive.com/hsp-online-groups/ Unapologetically Sensitive Merchandise-- https://patriciayounglcsw.com/product-category/merchandise/ Online HSP Course Materials (no group included) https://patriciayounglcsw.com/product-category/hsp-classes/ Podcast Survey-- https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe-fAYIyFgVb0VHlDorfm8ZdXClCcYDlv0cSP2RXZSZY16SIQ/viewform Receive the top 10 most downloaded episodes of the podcast-- https://www.subscribepage.com/e6z6e6 Sign up for the Newsletter-- https://www.subscribepage.com/y0l7d4 To write a review in itunes: * click on this link https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/unapologetically-sensitive/id1440433481?mt=2 * select “listen on Apple Podcasts” * chose “open in itunes” * choose “ratings and reviews” * click to rate the number of starts * click “write a review” Website--www.unapologeticallysensitive.com Facebook-- https://www.facebook.com/Unapologetically-Sensitive-2296688923985657/ Closed/Private Facebook group Unapologetically Sensitive-- https://www.facebook.com/groups/2099705880047619/ Closed/Private Facebook group for therapists and healers-- https://www.facebook.com/groups/208565440423641/ Instagram-- https://www.instagram.com/unapologeticallysensitive/ Youtube-- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOE6fodj7RBdO3Iw0NrAllg/videos?view_as=subscriber Tik Tok-- https://www.tiktok.com/@hsppodcast e-mail-- unapologeticallysensitive@gmail.com Show hashtag--#unapologeticallysensitive Shelly Aaron Productions— shellyaaronproductions@gmail.com Music-- Gravel Dance by Andy Robinson www.andyrobinson.com
55 min
Very Bad Therapy
Very Bad Therapy
Ben Fineman and Caroline Wiita
76. VBT in Focus: Potentially Harmful Therapies (with Dr. Alex Williams and Dr. John Sakaluk)
The more you learn about psychotherapy research, the less it all seems to make sense. Dr. Alex Williams and Dr. John Sakaluk are working to change that by researching the research itself. We discuss two of their latest papers on empirically supported treatments and potentially harmful therapies. Which modalities can we be confident about? Which psychological interventions appear to cause harm? What do we know about EMDR and exposure therapy? VBT in Focus is a series of sporadic episodes in which Carrie and Ben have the privilege of chatting with their favorite thinkers in the field of psychotherapy. Thank you for listening. To support the show and receive access to regular bonus episodes, check out the Very Bad Therapy Patreon community. Introduction: 0:00 – 11:20 Part One: 11:20 – 1:58:23 Part Two: 1:58:20 – 2:00:02 Very Bad Therapy: Website / Facebook / Bookshelf / Tell Us Your Story Ben Fineman Counseling – Therapy for Young Professionals (Benjamin Michael Fineman - Registered Associate MFT #119754 - Supervised by Curt Widhalm, LMFT #47333) Show Notes: * APA Division 12 List of Empirically Supported Treatments * The evidence for evidence-based therapy is not as clear as we thought * Evaluating the evidential value of empirically supported psychological treatments (ESTs): A meta-scientific review * Potentially harmful therapies: A meta-scientific review of evidential value * Dr. Alex Williams: Twitter / Email: alexwilliams@ku.edu * Dr. John Sakaluk: Twitter * The Most Ridiculous Guy From John Mulaney’s Latest Stand-Up Special Is 100% Real And 100% Weird * Scared Straight: Bullying with Betty White – SNL
2 hr
Two Shrinks Pod
Two Shrinks Pod
Dr Hunter Mulcare & Amy Donaldson
68 - The Seven Deadly Sins
To kick off 2021, two shrinks is getting sinful. Thanks to a suggestion from psychiatrist Dr Jackie Rakov (@psychwrite on twitter), we’re taking a look at the psychology behind the seven deadly sins. Do we find people more attractive when we’re primed with lust? Does envy make us more likely to harm others? Is pride different from straight-up narcissism? Listen in to for a light-hearted but in depth look at whether the sins really are that bad. Timepoint/Articles: 05:30 Envy https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167219897660 14:30 Pride - https://europepmc.org/article/med/33180528 26:25 Gluttony - https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24411760/ 40:58 Sloth - https://www.prdb.pk/article/prevalence-of-academic-procrastination-and-reasons-for-acade-8348 47:30 Lust - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00224545.2014.933158 58:51 Wrath - https://bpspsychub.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjso.12357 01:14:27 Greed - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0191886918305130 Media clips drawn from: Se7en (sins), Winnie the Pooh (gluttony), The Simpsons (Sloth), U2 (pride) Pride & Prejudice (pride), How I Met Your Mother (lust), Wallstreet (greed) and Star Trek II: Wrath of Khan (wrath) Hunter’s bonus I can’t believe it’s not sloth articles: (from 35:00-40:58 mins) Sloth bears: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2019-05979-001 Bridges: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1369847820304125
1 hr 27 min
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
The One Inside: An Internal Family Systems (IFS) podcast
Tammy Sollenberger
IFS and Inviting Curiosity with Racist Parts with Daphne Fatter
On today's episode, I chat with Dr. Daphne Fatter, certified IFS therapist and a licensed psychologist in private practice in Dallas, Texas. She teaches workshops on white racial socialization for therapists, in addition to teaching on trauma treatment for TZK seminars. She is a trained facilitator by Challenging Racism to lead conversations on race and racism. This is the last episode in the Heirloom Summit Series, and I'm excited to this with Daphne who walks through the Six Stage White Racial Developmental Model by Janet Helms. We also discuss teaching kids about whiteness, privilege and racism. The book that she mentions is "Raising White Kids: Bringing up children in a racially unjust America" by Jennifer Harvey. Daphne has a ton of resources on raising kids to be anti-racist on her website. We talk about trailheads to our protective parts around racism and the parts who try to separate, numb, and disconnect from racism and parts who engage in 'white saviorism.' A list of trailheads is on her website too. -------- Find out more about Daphne here: https://www.daphnefatterphd.com/ Her email is: info@daphnefatterphd.com Find out about the workshop she co-leads here: https://www.daphnefatterphd.com/treating-racial-trauma-series.html More Information about the White Racial Developmental Model by Jennifer Helms here: https://libguides.du.edu/c.php?g=1046908&p=7596766 https://coatescbc.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/helms-white-racial-identity-development-model.pdf She suggests this podcast on Whiteness that is 'too good not to share': https://www.sceneonradio.org/seeing-white/ For more about 'Calling in' check out: https://www.learningforjustice.org/magazine/spring-2019/speaking-up-without-tearing-down --------- I'd love to connect with you @ifs.tammy on Instagram and Twitter and on Facebook at The One Inside Facebook page. To register for the Heirloom Summit and receive a discount as a listener of TOI go to http://bit.ly/theoneinside Enjoy!
53 min
Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Inside Mental Health: A Psych Central Podcast
Healthline Media
Steven C. Hayes - What is ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy)?
What is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)? Is it just for select issues or can everyone benefit from ACT? Is there any evidence to support that ACT works at all? Dr. Steven C. Hayes, one of the pioneers of ACT, answers these questions and shares some of the interesting applications of ACT, ranging from helping professional athletes to Fortune 500 companies. Listen now! Guest Information for 'Acceptance and Commitment' Podcast Episode Steven C. Hayes is a Nevada Foundation professor of psychology in the behavior analysis program at the University of Nevada. An author of 46 books and nearly 650 scientific articles, he’s especially known for his work on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or “ACT,” which is one of the most widely-used and researched new methods of psychological intervention in the last 20 years. Hayes has received several national awards, such as the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. His popular book “Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life” for a time was the best-selling self-help book in the United States, and his new book “A Liberated Mind” has been recently released to wide acclaim. His TEDx talks have been viewed by over 600,000 people, and he’s ranked among the most cited psychologists in the world. About the Inside Mental Health Podcast Host Gabe Howard lives with bipolar disorder and is a nationally recognized speaker and podcast host. He is the author of the book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.
30 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
230: Secrets of Self-Esteem—What is it? How do I get it? How can I get rid of it once I’ve got it? And more, on Ask David!
* Ask David: Questions on self-esteem, recovery from PTSD, dating people with Borderline Personality Disorder, recovery on your own, and more! Jay asks: * Is psychotherapy homework still required if you’ve recovered completely from depression in a single, extended therapy session? * Is Ten Days to Self-Esteem better than the single chapter on this topic in Feeling Good? * Are people who were abused emotionally when growing up more likely to get involved with narcissistic or borderline individuals later in life because the relationship is “familiar?” * Many patients can read your books and do the exercises and recover on their own. Is a teacher or coach sometimes needed to speed things up? * Is it possible for a person to become happy WITHOUT needing anyone else if they have had depression in past and/or PTSD? * Also, how would Team-CBT address treating PTSD? PTSD can involve a person having multiple traumas. * * * * Is psychotherapy homework still required if you’ve recovered completely from depression in a single, extended therapy session? Thanks, Jay, I will make this an Ask david, if that is okay, but here is my quick response. Although many folks now show dramatic changes in a single, two-hour therapy session, they will still have to do homework to cement those gains, including: * Listening to or watching the recording of the session * Finish on paper any Daily Mood Log that was done primarily in role-playing during the session. In other words, write the Positive thoughts, rate the belief, and re-rate the belief in the corresponding negative thought. * Use the Daily Mood Log in the future whenever you get upset and start to have negative thoughts again. * I also do Relapse Prevention Training following the initial dramatic recovery, and this takes about 30 minutes. I advise the patient that relapse, which I define as one minute or more of feeling crappy, is 100% certain, and that no human being can be happy all the time. We all hit bumps in the road from time to time. When they do relapse, their original negative thoughts will return, and they will need to use the same technique again that worked for them the first time they recovered. In addition, they will have certain predictable thoughts when they relapse, like “this proves that the therapy didn’t rally work,” or “this shows that I really am a hopeless case,” or worthless, etc. I have them record a role-play challenging these thoughts with the Externalization of Voices, and do not discharge them until they can knock all these thoughts out of the park. I tell them to save the recording, and play it if they need it when they relapse. I also tell them that if they can’t handle the relapse, I’ll be glad to give them a tune up any time they need it. I rarely hear from them again, which is sad, actually, since I have developed a fondness for nearly all the patients I’ve ever treated. But I’d rather lose them quickly to recovery, than work with them endlessly because they’re not making progress! People with Relationship Problems recover more slowly than individuals with depression or anxiety for at least three reasons, and can rarely or never be treated effectively in a single two-hour session: * The outcome and process resistance to change in people with troubled relationships is typically way more intense. * It takes tremendous commitment and practice to get good at the five secrets of effective communication, in the same way that learning to play piano beautifully takes much commitment and practice. * Resolving relationship conflicts usually requires the death of the “self” or “ego,” and that can be painful. That’s why the Disarming Technique can be so hard for most people to learn, and many don’t even want to learn it, thinking that self-defense and arguing and fighting back is the best road to travel! * * * * Is Ten Days to Self-Esteem better than the single chapter on this topic in Feeling Good? Yes, Ten Days to Self-Esteem would likely be a deeper dive into the topic of Self-Esteem. It is a ten-step program that can be used in groups or individually in therapy, or as a self-help tool. There is a Leader’s Manual, too, for those who want to develop groups based on it. * * * * Are people who were abused emotionally when growing up more likely to get involved with narcissistic or borderline individuals later in life because the relationship is “familiar?” I was involved with a woman with Borderline Personality Disorder, and it was exhausting! Why was I attracted to her? Thank you for the question, Jay. Most claims about parents and childhood experiences, in my opinion, are just something somebody claimed and highly unlikely to be true if one had a really great data base to test the theory. We don’t really know why people are attracted to each other. Many men do seem attracted to women with Borderline Personality Disorder. Perhaps it’s exciting and dramatic dynamic that they’re attracted to, and perhaps it’s appealing to try to “help” someone who seems wounded. Good research on topics like this would be enormously challenging, and people would just ignore the results if not in line with their own thinking. Our field is not yet very scientific, but is dominated by “cults” and people who believe, and who desperately want to believe, things that are highly unlikely, in my opinion, to be true. I do quite a lot of data analysis using a sophisticated statistical modeling program called AMOS (the Analysis of Moment Structures) created by Dr. James Arbuckle from Temple University in Philadelphia, someone I admire tremendously. This program does something called structural equation modeling. In the typical analysis, the program tells you that your theory cannot possibly be true, based on your data. If you are brave, this can lead to radical changes in how you think and see things, especially if you are not “stuck” in your favored theories. But this type of analysis is not for the faint of heart. All the best, David Here is Jay’s follow-up email: HI Dr. Burns, As you know A LOT of people attribute their present problems (depression / anxiety / relationship conflicts / addictions) to their "abusive" or "toxic" relationship with their parents. It is interesting that it seems some people internalize negative beliefs about themselves based on what their parents said to them on a consistent basis. But it seems you are saying the data does not support that theory. Jay Thanks, Jay, I’m glad you responded again. There may be some truth to those kinds of theories. We know, for example, that abused or feral cats often have trouble with trust. So, we don’t want to trivialize the pain and the horrors that many humans and animals alike endure. At the same time, people are eager to jump onto theories that “sound right” to them and serve their purposes, and most of these theories are not based on sound research. Here are two examples from my own research. I tested, in part, the theory that depression comes from bad relationships, and also that addictions result from emotional problems. I examined the causal relationships between depression on the one hand and troubled vs happy relationships with loved ones on the other hand in several hundred patients during the first 12 weeks of treatment at my clinical in Philadelphia, and published it in top psychology journal for clinical research. (will include link) That was because there were at the time two warring camps—those who said that a lack of loving and satisfying relationships causes depression, and those who said it was the other way around, that depression leads to troubled relationships. And the third group said it worked both ways. My study indicated that although troubled relationships were correlated with depression, there were NO causal links in either direction. Instead, the statistical models strongly hinted that an unobs…
47 min
The Adult Chair
The Adult Chair
Michelle Chalfant
251: How Feeling Your Emotions Can Change Your Relationship with Graham Chalfant
Everyone wants connection — we’re hardwired for it as humans! But we can only connect as deeply with others as we’ve connected with ourselves. Strong relationships start by going within, feeling our emotions and being willing to open up and share with our partners. On this week’s podcast, I have a very, very special guest...my husband! We’re talking with you today together and sharing some very personal details about our marriage and how feeling emotions has changed our relationship for the better. Graham comes from a background where emotions weren’t expressed, and I come from an Italian family that was very expressive. For so many years, we both saw the other as not emotional enough or too emotional. Learning to feel, honor and share our emotions has deepened our connection so much and been so transformational for us. In this episode, Graham shares what helped him learn to process his emotions, how that’s changed his response to different situations and the changes we’ve both seen in our relationship. Listen to discover: * How relationships can help us overcome childhood issues when we approach them with consciousness * The importance of raw, open communication in a relationship * Somatic processing and the power of feeling emotions in the body * Navigating anger and stress in a relationship * How feeling emotions deepens intimacy (both emotional and physical) By the way, Graham did all of this work on his own (no bonus points for having a spouse who is a therapist and coach!). Which means YOU can do this too! We’re all born with the ability to feel our emotions, but we have to tune in with intention instead of running away from them. When we do, we’ll find they stop coming out sideways and are instead an invitation into deeper connection with others. “When we engage in a relationship with another human being, our childhood issues are going to rear up. That person is here to help us work through those childhood issues.” - Michelle Chalfant “Once our youngest child left the house, then it all slowed down and it became more apparent to me that I needed to figure out this ‘feeling’ thing.” - Graham Chalfant “I learned I could just sit with it and in 30 seconds, that heaviness would literally melt away.” - Graham Chalfant “Everybody has the ability to feel emotions. At some point along our life journey, we turn them off and turn them down.” - Michelle Chalfant “When you feel an emotion without building a story around it, the emotion goes through you in 90 seconds.” - Michelle Chalfant Resources Episode #42: Inviting Your Relationship into The Adult Chair with Michelle and Graham Chalfant https://theadultchair.com/podcasts/42-inviting-your-relationship-into-the-adult-chair-with-michelle-and-graham-chalfant/ Episode #49: Am I Fraud? Imposter Syndrome & You! https://theadultchair.com/podcasts/49-am-i-a-fraud-imposter-syndrome-you/ P&G Hair Food https://hairfood.com/ Or find at Bed Bath & Beyond, Amazon, Target or Walmart The Adult Chair Workshop - Charleston New Dates: September 16-18, 2021 https://theadultchair.com/charleston/ More Adult Chair The Adult Chair Website https://theadultchair.com The Adult Chair Membership https://theadultchair.com/membership/ The Adult Chair Workshop https://theadultchair.com/events/ The Adult Chair Coaching Certification https://theadultchair.com/certification-program/ TAC Circles https://theadultchair.com/taccircles/ (Previously “TAC Gatherings”) Stay Connected Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/michelle.chalfant Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MichelleChalfantFanPage/ The Adult Chair Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/theadultchair/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Michellechalfant *** EPISODE CREDITS: If you like this podcast and are thinking of creating your own, consider talking to my producer, Danny Ozment. He helps thought leaders, influencers, executives, HR professionals, recruiters, lawyers, realtors, bloggers, coaches, and authors create, launch, and produce podcasts that grow their business and impact the world. Find out more at https://emeraldcitypro.com
57 min
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