Historically Black
Historically Black
Oct 17, 2016
Harlem Through James Van Der Zee's Lens
Play episode · 18 min
James Van Der Zee was a celebrated African American photographer who documented black New York for much of the 20th century. Van Der Zee was New York's leading black photographer during the Harlem Renaissance. His images emphasized the dignity, beauty and prosperity of black people at a time when the dominant culture didn't.
GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison
Day 10: Jesse Owens
You have to see yourself winning. Everybody's got that cousin... a cousin who is funnier than Eddie Murphy, one who can jump higher than Michael Jordan or that one who - with just a little coaching and education - could be the next Obama. Let’s agree to agree, we're blessed. Genius abounds at Black family reunions. So, when I look at Jesse Owens, it cracks me up because he looks like everybody’s cousin who can run fast. Jesse Owens was ours.  He was familiar. He was our chance to prove it. Settle the score. Win. He was the punchline to the joke of injustice. He was our graceful entrance.  And our “Hi Haters!” Jesse-Owens-was-redemption.  And, like so many of us who fight poverty, generational trauma, and thick-thick racism, Hitler didn't have anything for Jesse Owens - because he could already see victory before the race even began.  Call it survival.  Call it evolution.  What the enemy planned for his downfall became the greatest victory of his life.  Cue Koryn Hawthorne.  Won't He Do it! *Spiritual Warrior of the Day* In 1939, Jesse Owens was the most famous man on the planet.  He "single-handedly crushed Hitler's myth of Aryan superiority" by pushing the limits of human capability and smashing world records.  But today, we won't talk about gold medals.  No. Instead, we will explore three very-real moral dilemmas in Owens' life that just may help us out in 2020.  His life was complex. Rich with irony.  Hard fought and often misguided. Scrappy. Not always honorable.  And yet, we celebrate him - as a spiritual warrior - because he stayed in the race until the day he died.  Through decades of shifting definitions of Blackness, he kept his eyes on doing his personal best.  And for that, we draw a gritty brand of inspiration. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - The Prayer Edition at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with prayers, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 spiritual warriors. Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here: Won't He Do It - Koryn Hawthorne: https://open.spotify.com/track/5Vr9WTLcbpKRkQGvVen13W?si=0sJUEo3uQlm7brR-628xlw Soldiers In The Army - Rev. James Cleveland: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnudHcR_34M&feature=youtu.be We're Blessed - Fred Hammond: https://open.spotify.com/track/0ZD5LFsk2PMHicGH8MWRN8?si=ZKc8cUMiS6WesytoRpTo6Q
51 min
Intersectionality Matters!
Intersectionality Matters!
African American Policy Forum
27. Why the Court Matters: RBG's Legacy and the Fight She Leaves Behind
In this episode, Kimberlé speaks with six leading scholars about the legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Court’s largely undersung role in the battle for our democracy, and the profound consequences of the Left’s failure to prioritize the courts over the last several decades. With:
 DEVON CARBADO - Professor of Law, UCLA; Author, Acting White? Rethinking Race in “Post-Racial” America 
ERWIN CHEMERINSKY - Dean, UC Berkeley School of Law; Author, We the People: A Progressive Reading of the Constitution for the Twenty-First Century
 SUZANNE GOLDBERG - Professor of Law, Columbia; Founding Director, Sexuality & Gender Law Clinic at Columbia 
 CHERYL HARRIS - Professor of Law, UCLA; Author, “Whiteness as Property”
 SHERRILYN IFILL - President and Director-Counsel, NAACP Legal Defense Fund MELISSA MURRAY - Professor of Law, NYU, Author, “The Equal Rights Amendment: A Century in the Making" Executive Order on Combating Race and Sex Stereotyping: https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-combating-race-sex-stereotyping/ Hosted by Kimberlé Crenshaw (@sandylocks)
 Produced by Julia Sharpe-Levine
 Edited by Julia Sharpe-Levine and Rebecca Scheckman 
 Additional support provided by the African American Policy Forum 
Music by Blue Dot Sessions
 Follow us at @intersectionalitymatters, @IMKC_podcast
1 hr 6 min
Black History Year
Black History Year
Limina House, PushBlack
The Power of the Black Voter with Nse Ufot
Welcome to Season 2 of Black History Year. In everything we do at PushBlack, we’re always asking, “How do we work together to make things better for Black people?” In this season of the Black History Year podcast, we’re stepping to that challenge in an even bigger way. We have episodes that’ll open eyes to new ideas about reparations, criminal justice reform, and the ways Black cooperative economics can help us strengthen our communities and build wealth. And we’re gonna reconnect to the beautiful parts of our culture found in our food and spiritual practices. 12 episodes. Twice as much Black History as our first season! So make sure you tell your people that we’re back and let’s get to it. In our season kick-off, we're sitting down with the amazing Nse Ufot, the executive director of the New Georgia Project, where she’s working to get eligible voters registered and participating in our democracy. We know there is A LOT going on around voting rights. Nse is _exactly_ the right person to get us focused on what’s important. It was a great conversation and we're really happy to have her with us to kick off season two. This podcast is produced by PushBlack, the nation’s largest non-profit Black media company. PushBlack exists because we saw we had to take this into our own hands. _You_ make PushBlack happen with your contributions at Black History Year dot com. Most people do 5 or 10 bucks a month, but everything makes a difference. Thanks for supporting the work. Special thanks to Detroit’s Motor City Woman Studio and Andrea Daniel. The Black History Year production team includes: Tareq Alani, Patrick Sanders, Cydney Smith, William Anderson, Jareyah Bradley, Brooke Brown, Shonda Buchanan, Eskedar Getahun, Leslie Taylor-Grover, Abeni Jones, and Akua Tay. For Limina House, our producers are Jessica Rugh Frantz and Sasha Kai Parker, who also edits the podcast. Black History Year’s Executive Producers are Julian Walker for PushBlack and Mikel Ellcessor for Limina House.
47 min
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