Dr. Haile T. Debas (Ep. 22, 2018)
Play episode · 30 min

On this week’s program, In Black America producer and host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Haile T. Debas, MD., Director Emeritus of California Global Health Institute, about his distinguished career as a physician, researcher, teacher and academic leader.

Black History Year
Black History Year
Limina House, PushBlack
The Power of the Black Voter with Nse Ufot
Welcome to Season 2 of Black History Year. In everything we do at PushBlack, we’re always asking, “How do we work together to make things better for Black people?” In this season of the Black History Year podcast, we’re stepping to that challenge in an even bigger way. We have episodes that’ll open eyes to new ideas about reparations, criminal justice reform, and the ways Black cooperative economics can help us strengthen our communities and build wealth. And we’re gonna reconnect to the beautiful parts of our culture found in our food and spiritual practices. 12 episodes. Twice as much Black History as our first season! So make sure you tell your people that we’re back and let’s get to it. In our season kick-off, we're sitting down with the amazing Nse Ufot, the executive director of the New Georgia Project, where she’s working to get eligible voters registered and participating in our democracy. We know there is A LOT going on around voting rights. Nse is _exactly_ the right person to get us focused on what’s important. It was a great conversation and we're really happy to have her with us to kick off season two. This podcast is produced by PushBlack, the nation’s largest non-profit Black media company. PushBlack exists because we saw we had to take this into our own hands. _You_ make PushBlack happen with your contributions at Black History Year dot com. Most people do 5 or 10 bucks a month, but everything makes a difference. Thanks for supporting the work. Special thanks to Detroit’s Motor City Woman Studio and Andrea Daniel. The Black History Year production team includes: Tareq Alani, Patrick Sanders, Cydney Smith, William Anderson, Jareyah Bradley, Brooke Brown, Shonda Buchanan, Eskedar Getahun, Leslie Taylor-Grover, Abeni Jones, and Akua Tay. For Limina House, our producers are Jessica Rugh Frantz and Sasha Kai Parker, who also edits the podcast. Black History Year’s Executive Producers are Julian Walker for PushBlack and Mikel Ellcessor for Limina House. _Useful links:_ The New Georiga Project Georgia My Voter Page
47 min
GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Morgan Dixon + Vanessa Garrison
Day 12: The Coltranes
I listened to John Coltrane all night ...and woke up singing the old gospel song, "I Hasten to His Throne."  I didn't fully understand the connection until now. Isn't that what this is all about?  Hastening to what is greater? *Spiritual Warriors of the Day:* For John Coltrane, it was at his lowest moment, in a cold fight against heroin, on his bedroom floor, he experienced God's Love.  From that moment, he dedicated his life to a fervent practice of spiritual awakening.  And because God is good, this awakening came with a spiritual guide from Detroit, a woman named Alice.  Together, they created A Love Supreme.  More than a ground-breaking album, it was an ethos.  A dissertation on love.  They improvised connecting with God day after day.  She once meditated continually for weeks. It was this devotion and discipline that gave the world one of the purest languages of love imaginable.  Love, for them, was not a falling.  No.  It was a practice.  A habit.  A discipline. A lifestyle.  Maybe even a religion.  It was a love note on the kitchen table kind of love.  A harp for Christmas kind of love.  Four babies in four years kind of love. Be still and hear God speak kind of love.  And when John was in deep, delivering his 4-part musical masterpiece, Alice was meditating, raising the boys and beaming with anticipation.  She said, "Before I even met John, there was something in me that knew there was a divine connection - there were things that he said to me, they weren’t spoken with the human voice." The Coltranes lived with edgelessness. They were expensive. Their music, healing.  In one of the most beautiful articles I've ever read, Carvell Wallace said that John gave the soul a place to sing. He writes, "There is something about a saint that makes it safe for all of us to get lost in the swell of being human."  And in a brilliant story for NPR, Sydnee Monday called Alice's music "spiritual preservation." She became the matriarch of Black meditation. Her transcendental music helped millions of us find enlightenment.  And he is arguably the greatest musician to ever live.  Together, they transformed the world. Join GirlTrek’s Black History Bootcamp - The Prayer Edition at blackhistorybootcamp.com to receive specially curated emails with prayers, survival tips, speeches + dedicated songs to listen to for each episode. Together we will discover the stories of 21 spiritual warriors. Disclaimer: We do not own the rights to the music played during this broadcast. Original content can be found here: I Love The Lord - Whitney Houston ft. Georgia Mass Choir: https://open.spotify.com/track/2xrXUa8o1JJtz8nobY2UsY?si=xodi35yOSgyQubts4kqSOA A Love Supreme, Pt. I Acknowledgement - John Coltrane: https://open.spotify.com/track/0CLbmkYmQIWiEwnsbOkLpd?si=Ur4Bfxm8RR2ruZKT2Dk0ug
59 min
The Daily
The Daily
Social Media and the Hunter Biden Report
Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have invested a significant amount of time and money trying to avoid the mistakes made during the 2016 election. A test of those new policies came last week, when The New York Post published a story that contained supposedly incriminating documents and pictures taken from the laptop of Hunter Biden. The provenance and authenticity of that information is still in question, and Joe Biden’s campaign has rejected the assertions. While YouTube largely did nothing, Facebook deprioritized the Post story and Twitter initially moved to ban all links to the piece on its platform. Those actions infuriated some Republican lawmakers and conservative media figures, who accused the social networks of censorship and election interference. We speak to Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The Times, about how the episode reveals the tension between fighting misinformation and protecting free speech. Guest: Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading:  * Here’s Kevin’s full report on the efforts by Twitter and Facebook to limit the spread of the Hunter Biden story. * The New York Post published the piece despite doubts within the paper’s newsroom — some reporters withheld their bylines and questioned the credibility of the article. * Joe Biden’s campaign has rejected the assertions made in the story.
25 min
MPR News with Kerri Miller
MPR News with Kerri Miller
Minnesota Public Radio
Should we trust the polls in the 2020 election?
Recent headlines are full of the latest polls and election forecasts. “Biden leads Trump in Wisconsin,” declares CBS; “Biden advantage Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin,” says CNN; “Biden is favored to win the election,” according to FiveThirtyEight.com. But can the polls be trusted? After 2016, polls were criticized for underestimating Donald Trump’s chance of victory. They got some things right. Nationwide surveys correctly predicted Hillary Clinton would win the popular vote. Polls predicted she would win it by 3 percent, and she won it by 2 percent. However, in many regions of the country, especially in battleground states in the Midwest, statewide polls persistently misread support for Trump. An analysis of what went wrong found state polls failed to factor in education, for example. People with more years of education were more likely to support Clinton and also more likely to participate in polls, leading to an overrepresentation of Clinton supporters in the samples. What other factors contributed to polls miscalculating Trump’s chances? And what did pollsters learn from the mistakes of 2016? Wednesday at 9 a.m., MPR News host Kerri Miller discussed how polls work, how to interpret them and whether they should even be used to predict an election outcome that can only be known after the ballots are counted. Guests: * Margie Omero, is a principal at GBAO Strategies and co-hosts The Pollsters podcast. * Seth Masket is director of the Center on American Politics at the University of Denver. He is also the author of the “Learning from Loss: The Democrats 2016-2020.” Have questions leading up to the Election Day? #AskMPRNews. We want to hear your stories, too. #TellMPRNews what is motivating you to get out and vote this year. Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS. * Full coverage from MPR News Election 2020
49 min
The Pulse
The Pulse
WHYY
The Hidden Costs of Science
In science, we tend to focus on the destination, not the journey. But for every big breakthrough, every historic discovery, there are countless contributions that no one notices: the forgotten grunt workers, research that came to nothing, even lives lost in the pursuit of progress. Today’s episode is about the hidden cost of science — the price of doing business that we rarely think about. We hear stories about the mental health toll of graduate school, the literal cost of research, and the environmental impact of scientific progress. Also heard on this week’s episode: * J’Nese Williams — a historian of Modern Britain and lecturer at Stanford University — tells the story of the enslaved workforce that built the botanical garden on the tropical island of St. Vincent. She did some of her research on this topic during a fellowship at the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, Missouri. * We talk with diabetes researcher Antentor Hinton Jr. about learning to say no, and his tips for succeeding and thriving in graduate school. * Each year, universities spend millions of dollars on a hidden cost: access to research and scientific journals. But that’s starting to change thanks to the Open Access movement. Reporter Liz Tung talks with University of California librarian Jeffrey MacKie-Mason about what’s changing and why. * Many scientists are passionate about the use of animals in their research. They feel empathy for the animals, but they also believe that this work is necessary, and serves a greater purpose. Reporter Jad Sleiman explores this complicated relationship.
49 min
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