Teamistry
Teamistry
Nov 16, 2020
A Shot at Change: The Making of a Vaccine
Play • 27 min

In the West African country of Burkina Faso in the 1980s, an 18-year-old boy is killed in the road. Why? A case of meningitis. The meningitis epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa spurred a global race to find a vaccine, led by the founding of the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP). This network of doctors, vaccine developers, public health officials, and UN workers converged to develop an inexpensive vaccine – without Big Pharma. Instead, they built teams as an ecosystem of thriving partnerships. In this episode of Teamistry, we hear from the original MVP team and how they persevered despite enormous challenges.

Dr. Samba Sow, Director General of the Centre for Vaccine Development in Mali, Dr. Suresh Jhadav, Executive Director of the Serum Institute of India and Dr. Marc LaForce, then Director of the Meningitis Vaccine Project. We also hear from Dr. Ngozi Erondu, an infectious disease specialist who explains MVP's legacy in building "South-South" collaborations, and Dr. Mark Alderson, project leader at PATH, describes how the team brought the vaccine from labs in one part of the globe to clinics in another.

Teamistry is an original podcast from Atlassian. For more on the series, go to https://www.atlassian.com/blog/podcast.

Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Kurt Nelson, PhD and Tim Houlihan
The Counterintuitive Persuasion of The Catalyst with Jonah Berger
Jonah Berger is a marketing professor in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and the internationally best-selling author Contagious and Invisible Influence. He consults with some of the largest corporations in the world and derives great insights from his interactions with business leaders wrestling with strategic issues. In this episode, we caught up with Jonah to discuss his most recent book called The Catalyst. His book takes a counter-intuitive view on persuasion by focusing on reducing barriers to change rather than learning just the right lines, information, or coercive measures to use. Jonah advocates for first understanding why people are doing what they’re doing before we try to get them to do something else. He shared his REDUCE model with us - Reactance, Endowment, Distance, Uncertainty, and Corroborating Evidence – and we dove into Reactance as a major component of how we resist change. The harder you push on someone to change, the more likely they are to push back. It’s natural for us to push back and to illustrate, just try this little experiment with someone in your household (another adult). Ask your adult counterpart to hold up their hand at shoulder level and have your palms meet. Tell them you’re going to push on their hand, then do it with some force. Do they push back to slow the advance of your hand or do they just go limp and let you push their hand as far as you can? It’s likely that they’ll push back. The same is true of any behavior change. And that’s okay. Our natural tendencies serve us well in many situations, but not all. Jonah’s perspective on how catalysts change behavior will open your mind to new ideas. We hope you enjoy it and, this week, find your groove. © 2021 Behavioral Grooves Links Jonah Berger, PhD: https://jonahberger.com/author-bio/ Jonah Berger Additional Resources: https://jonahberger.com/resources/ Lee Ross, PhD: https://profiles.stanford.edu/lee-ross Mark Lepper, PhD: https://psychology.stanford.edu/people/mark-lepper Kurt Lewin, PhD “Force Field Analysis”: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Lewin Musical Links Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ardglr9MVVQ Queen “We Will Rock You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvKkIttJLcc Tim Houlihan “Thinking About You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xS-PsjRktUk Dolly Parton “I Will Always Love You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0bEZH6ZqG4
48 min
Marketing Today with Alan Hart
Marketing Today with Alan Hart
Alan B. Hart
Hispanic Business at PepsiCo with Esperanza Teasdale
On this 243rd episode of "Marketing Today," host Alan Hart speaks with Esperanza Teasdale, vice president and general manager of the Hispanic Business Unit for Pepsico Beverages North America. Teasdale is responsible for the overall strategy, engagement, and sales for a Hispanic business unit that brings in over $2 billion per year. We start our conversation with Teasdale's experience from growing up with two parents that had both immigrated to the US from Ecuador in search of a better life. Since they both had demanding blue-collar jobs, Teasdale "grew up as a latch key kid," taking herself to and from school as a child, essentially responsible for herself. Teasdale then discusses her engineering education, spending time in manufacturing environments after graduation until attaining her MBA and ultimately moving onto sales. Once Teasdale realized that the sales sector wasn't for her, she moved to marketing. We then dive into the Hispanic business unit and the "untapped potential" that led to its creation. Now and into the future, Teasdale and her team are focused on multicultural marketing, as "everything we do should be multicultural because that is the fabric of our country." Teasdale takes us through the helping hands she received throughout her career as a result of her willingness to be vulnerable. "You don't have to wait for someone to ask you to take a seat; you can take it yourself." Lastly, we discuss the opportunity that marketers have today to think differently about their previously rejected ideas because "the world today is different than it was before!"   Highlights from this week's "Marketing Today": As the daughter of immigrants, Esperanza greatly appreciates the sacrifices that her parents made to have a better life. 1:37 Esperanza's parents came from the hot ecosystem of Ecuador to the cold winter in the US. 2:30 Equality is something that everyone is trying to achieve in today's world, especially with all that has gone on this year. 3:22 There were times when Esperanza's parents were injured or sick, and no money came in the door. 3:54 After studying engineering in her undergrad in college, Esperanza spent quite a bit of time in a manufacturing environment. 6:58 Esperanza's company paid for her MBA, after which she had her choice of path, ultimately choosing marketing. 7:48 The Hispanic Business Unit at PepsiCo was created to tap into the previously untapped Hispanic sector. 10:36 Multicultural marketing has gone through a revolution that parallels the makeup of our country. 12:29 There is no one-size-fits-all in the melting pot that is the US, even within each culture. 13:13 P&G has shown to be a champion of diversity and inclusion by driving cultural relevance through its advertising. 16:03 Heading into the future, we need to be more culturally relevant, and the Hispanic Unit is an example of what the marketing industry should look like. 19:10 The chaos and uncertainty of 2020 caused PepsiCo to pause during the initial breakout of COVID. 22:10 Esperanza and her team made sure to study the effects of COVID on the habits of Hispanic consumers. 22:50 The Hispanic population has shown resilience in its journey to get to the US and this helped maintain optimism in the face of chaos. 24:37 To promote passionate multicultural youth's ability to vote, PepsiCo launched its Unmute Your Voice Campaign. 26:12 Esperanza's team is focused on leaning into the communities that need the most help as it enters 2021. 28:06 2020 has shown Americans to be empathetic, looking for ways to help however they can. 29:30 PepsiCo finds itself in so many households in the US that the decision to make a bold message brings a lot of risk. 32:41 Esperanza takes responsibility in her role as a Latina executive to bring others along to change their paths for the better. 35:06 The ability to show up, take action without someone asking, and put yourself out there will bring the greatest rewards. 38:30 Throughout her career, Esperanza has received advice and help from high-level executives to be successful. 39:15 The experience of losing both of her parents, while devastating, taught Esperanza a lot about herself and her family history. 42:10 Esperanza feels a responsibility to be empathetic to the motivations behind the actions of the people around her. 44:15 Looking back, Esperanza would encourage herself to take the offered hands of anyone that had done her wrong. 46:01 The Mastercard Initiative created a card that allowed anyone that is transgender to have their true identity on the card. 48:35 For those marketers with a fixed mindset, current times offer the opportunity to think about things differently. 50:52   Resources Mentioned: Ecuador Latchkey kid P&G's Marc Pritchard Marc Pritchard's work to drive diversity (Adweek) Marc Pritchard from P&G on Marketing Today Pepsi Unmute Your Voice Campaign Scott Finlow from PepsiCo on Marketing Today Growth mindset Orange Theory Arm Band Mastercard Card for LBTQIA+   Subscribe to the podcast: Listen in iTunes (link: http://apple.co/2dbdAhV) Listen in Google Podcasts (link: http://bit.ly/2Rc2kVa) Listen in Spotify (Link: http://spoti.fi/2mCUGnC ) Connect with the Guest: https://www.linkedin.com/in/esperanza-teasdale-a867225/ https://twitter.com/espyt https://twitter.com/PepsiCo Connect with Marketing Today and Alan Hart: http://twitter.com/abhart https://www.linkedin.com/in/alanhart http://twitter.com/themktgtoday https://www.facebook.com/themktgtoday/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/marketing-today-with-alan-hart/   Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/marketingtoday See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
54 min
IT Visionaries
IT Visionaries
Mission
How Convoys API is Saving the Environment and Optimizing the Trucking Experience for Drivers and Shippers
Every day, millions of truckers grab their keys, hop in their semis, start their engines, and head out on the open road to pick-up and deliver billions of products to millions of stores across the U.S. The trucking industry is an integral piece of what fuels America’s economy. And businesses around the country rely on these trucks to pick-up and receive orders on time, especially as the need for on-demand products and delivery has risen in conjunction with the rise of online shopping and mobile technology. So why then has the shipping industry been so slow to change and adopt new technologies? Grant Goodale, is a former Amazon employee and now the CTO of Convoy. When he learned that 40% of trucks you see on the road are often carrying empty loads because of a poor booking process, he and his partners asked themselves a simple question: how do they disrupt the trucking industry with software that optimizes the user experience and eliminates this inefficiency? _“We built what was probably the smartest pricing engine in the industry to help us understand all of those variables, all of those inputs as to what a trucking job should cost so that we can get the best pricing from shippers for a given job, and then help carriers get the right price for the work that they're doing.” _On this episode of _IT Visionaries_, Grant discusses how Convoy has optimized the booking experience for shippers and drivers with its software, and how that new process has helped not just the bottom line, but the environment as a whole. Plus, Grant explains why the trucking industry has been slow to adopt new technologies, and some tips for early-stage start-ups on how to extend your runway. Main Takeaways * Lost in Time: Most trucking companies employ less than six trucks, which means these small businesses often don’t have staffing for sales, marketing, or a website. Because of the structure of these businesses, most drivers were booking and negotiating jobs on Load Boards, which meant companies had to physically post jobs, drivers had to call to negotiate rates and book gigs themselves, all assuming the physical postings were up-to-date. It is a system in clear need for optimization. * Better for the Environment: 40% of the trucks you see on the road are empty trucks shuttling between jobs. Because a majority of drivers don’t book their next job until one delivery is completed, their routes are not optimized, which means more time on the road and more time between jobs. If drivers can cut back just 1% from that 40%, they can eliminate nearly 380 million gallons of diesel gas used each year. * Don’t Bite Off More Than You Can Chew: As a start-up, every new job you take on chips away at your supply. Make sure you are as cautious about your supply fragmentation as much as possible to make sure you aren’t overextending yourself or your business’s capabilities. IT Visionaries is brought to you by the Salesforce Platform - the #1 cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience. Build connected experiences, empower every employee, and deliver continuous innovation - with the customer at the center of everything you do. Learn more at salesforce.com/platform
50 min
The Best 10% Of Tim Ferriss
The Best 10% Of Tim Ferriss
Tim Ferriss
Inside the Mind of Glenn Beck, You Find…Walt Disney and Orson Welles?
Contact: best10.timferriss@gmail.com Original: http://fourhourworkweek.com/2015/04/06/glenn-beck/ “When I turned 30, I knew my life was at a crossroads. It was either over, or I was going to restart.” – Glenn Beck [9:10] The goal of my blog and podcast is to push you outside of your comfort zone and force you to question assumptions. This is why I invite divergent thinkers and world-class performers who often disagree. I might interview Tony Robbins and then Matt Mullenweg. Or I might have a long chat with Sam Harris, PhD, and later invite a seemingly opposite guest like… Glenn Beck. This interview is a wild ride, and it happened — oddly enough — thanks to a late-night sauna session. I was catching up with an old friend, who is mixed-race, a Brown University grad, and liberal in almost every sense of the word. I casually asked him, “If you could pick one person to be on the podcast, who would it be?” “Glenn Beck,” he answered without a moment’s hesitation. “His story is FASCINATING.” He described how Glenn hit rock bottom and restarted his life in his 30’s, well past the point most people think it possible. Fast forward to 2014, Forbes named him to their annual Celebrity 100 Power List and pegged his earnings at $90 million for that year. This placed him ahead of people like Mark Burnett, Jimmy Fallon, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Will Smith. Glenn’s platforms — including radio, tv, digital (TheBlaze.com), publishing, etc. — get somewhere between 30 and 50 million unique visitors per month. This interview is neither a “gotcha” interview nor a softball interview. I ask some tough questions (e.g. “If you were reborn as a disabled gay woman in a poor family, what political system would you want in place?”), but my primary goal is to pull out routines, habits, books, etc. that you can use. This show is about actionable insight, not argument for argument’s sake. First and foremost, this is a story of entrepreneurship, and whether you love Glenn, hate Glenn, or have never heard his name, there is a lot to learn from him.
1 hr 50 min
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