No Compromise
No Compromise
Sep 29, 2020
Building The Kingdom Of God
45 min
In Episode 4: The Dorr brothers have become known for their network of ultra pro-gun Facebook groups. But their family name has also been connected to an extreme religious movement that has sought to eliminate public education, outlaw homosexuality and replace all laws with rules from the Old Testament. Lisa and Chris dig into the roots of the Dorr family to learn more.
You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton
You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton
iHeartRadio
Mental Health (with Audra McDonald, Jason Kander, and Allie Brosh)
The recent spike in Americans suffering from anxiety and depression makes evident that COVID-19 has impacted our health in more ways than one. In this episode, Hillary talks with three people who have spoken openly about their own mental health struggles: Tony Award-winner Audra McDonald, veterans advocate Jason Kander, and author Allie Brosh. Audra McDonald is a singer and actor who has won a record-breaking six Tony Awards, two Grammy Awards, and an Emmy. Onstage, she’s performed in numerous plays, musicals, and operas, including Carousel, Ragtime, and Porgy & Bess. On TV, she portrayed Dr. Naomi Bennett on the medical drama Private Practice, and in 2018, she joined the cast of the CBS All Access’ The Good Fight. Her latest solo album is Sing Happy. Jason Kander is a veterans advocate and a former Army Captain who served in Afghanistan. He was elected to the Missouri state legislature in 2008 and as Missouri Secretary of State in 2012. Jason is the founder of Let America Vote, an organization that fights to protect voting rights; the national expansion director for the Veterans Community Project; and co-host of the political podcast Majority 54. His memoir, Outside the Wire: Ten Lessons I’ve Learned in Everyday Courage, was a bestseller. Allie Brosh is a former blogger and the author of Hyperbole and a Half (2013) and Solutions and Other Problems, which was published earlier this year. Find a full transcript here.
1 hr 2 min
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect
WNYC Studios
The Most Perfect Album: Episode 9
This season, More Perfect is taking its camera lens off the Supreme Court and zooming in on the words of the people: the 27 amendments that We The People have made to our Constitution. We're taking on these 27 amendments both in song and in story. This episode is best listened to alongside 27: The Most Perfect Album, an entire album (an ALBUM!) and digital experience of original music and art inspired by the 27 Amendments. Think of these episodes as the audio liner notes. In More Perfect's final episode of the season, listen to liner notes for two amendments that contemplate the still-unfinished status of our Constitution. "27" is an album that marks a particular point in our history: this moment when we have 27 Amendments to our Constitution. What will be the 28th? Maybe it will address our nation's capital. The capital has been a bit of a Constitutional anomaly for much of our nation's history — it's at the heart of the democracy, but because it's not a state, people in Washington D.C. have been disenfranchised almost by accident. The 23rd Amendment solved some of the problem — it gave D.C. the right to vote for president. But it left much of D.C.'s representation questions unanswered. D.C. still does not have voting representation in Congress. Instead, D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to Congress. For this liner note, More Perfect profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. The song for the 23rd Amendment is by The Mellow Tones, a group of students from D.C. high school Duke Ellington School of the Arts, along with their teacher Mark G. Meadows. The chorus, "Why won't you count on me?" reflects on the continued disenfranchisement of our nation's capital. The final amendment of the album, the 27th Amendment, put limits on Senators' ability to give themselves a pay raise, and it has arguably the most unusual path to ratification of all 27. The first draft for the amendment was written by none other than James Madison in 1789, but back then, it didn't get enough votes from the states for ratification. It wasn't until a college student named Gregory Watson awakened the dormant amendment centuries later that it was finally ratified. The 27th Amendment song is by Kevin Devine and tells Watson's story.
24 min
Into America
Into America
MSNBC
"The Dead Are Arising"
Malcolm X is a towering cultural figure. Movies have been made about him, books have been written, and he’s been mythologized since his assassination in 1965. But an encounter at a cocktail party in Detroit led journalist Les Payne to realize how much more there was to understand about the man.   Les Payne spent the last three decades of his life learning everything he could about Malcolm X. The result is The Dead Are Arising: The Life of Malcolm X, a new book that sheds light on the people, places, and experiences that shaped Malcolm X into the man he’d become. Late last month, The Dead Are Arising won a 2020 National Book Award for nonfiction.   It’s praise that Les Payne would not live to hear. Payne died in 2018 while still working to put the final touches on his book. So his daughter, Tamara Payne, who had been a researcher with him from the start of the project, finished the work.   On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee sits down with Tamara and her mother, Violet Payne, to talk about Les Payne, their family’s love for Malcolm X, and the legacies of these two men. For a transcript, please visit https://www.msnbc.com/intoamerica.  Further Reading:  * 'Interior Chinatown' novel, Malcolm X bio win National Book Awards  * 55 years later, 'The Autobiography of Malcolm X' still inspires  * Malcolm X assassination case may be reopened after Netflix documentary
30 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu