Latino USA
Latino USA
Nov 24, 2020
Kate's Summer
Play • 31 min

The summer of 2020 was filled with uncertainty as more than 20 million people in the U.S. were left unemployed — including Kate Bustamante’s parents. Bustamante is a 20-year-old student at Santa Ana College in Santa Ana, California. She’s always worked part-time and attended school as long as she can remember. But this summer was different. Overnight, Bustamante dropped out of classes and became her family’s breadwinner. In this personal piece Bustamante, through diary recordings and personal reflections, takes us into her world and what she went through over the summer.

Our America with Julián Castro
Our America with Julián Castro
Lemonada Media
A Beacon of Hope (with Ayanna Pressley and London Breed)
Although 2020 is behind us, the new year is already off to an unsettling start. On January 6, chaos erupted as a violent mob of Trump loyalists stormed our nation’s Capitol, leaving five people dead.    One of this week’s guests, Massachusetts representative Ayanna Pressley, was at the Capitol that day. Fearing for her safety, she reached for the panic button installed in her congressional office only to find it had been torn out. The buttons were installed as a security measure in 2019 after members of the “Squad,” a progressive group of House Democrats, endured racist attacks from President Trump.    With the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris less than a week away, Rep. Pressley and Mayor London Breed of San Francisco join us to talk about the long process of healing and reconstruction necessary for our country. The two influential leaders discuss how to reimagine our criminal legal system and housing affordability, and the importance of building a representative, inclusive economy after a year of reckoning with racial injustice.   Follow Mayor Breed and Rep. Pressley on twitter.   Keep up with Julián on twitter @JulianCastro and Instagram @JulianCastroTX.    Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows.   To follow along with a transcript and/or take notes for friends and family, go to https://www.lemonadamedia.com/show/our-america shortly after the air date.   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
46 min
Latinos Who Lunch
Latinos Who Lunch
Latinos Who Lunch
Episode 186: Radio Lonchea 2020
We are celebrating this already strange year with good vibes and with another great Radio Lonchea episode! That’s right, as part of LWL annual homage to their favorite music podcasts, Radio Menea and Songmess, FavyFav and Babelito recount their favorite albums of the year. From Juana to Ela, this episode is filled with incredible music from all over Latin America. Stay tuned till the end for a very special announcement from los chicos del podcast.  As always, send your questions to AskLWLpod@gmail.com and we may read them on a future episode. #podsincolor #supportbrownpodcasts #supportlatinxpodcasts #lwlpod #latinx Show Notes: Radio Menea (https://www.radiomenea.com/) Songmess (https://open.spotify.com/show/6XaS0yhnQbH0mMPHGMMny6) Juana Molina (https://juanamolina.bandcamp.com/album/anrmal) Bad Bunny (https://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/bad-bunny-yhlqmdlg/) Molero (https://holuzam.bandcamp.com/album/ficciones-del-tr-pico) Mula (https://www.indierocks.mx/musica/resenas/mula-mundos/) Buscabulla Ela Minus  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWeYGNXZ_2E) 8D Audio (https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1jKlcQqhL3zdNJCael240n) Lido (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSaZB6Z39h0) Balún (https://www.angelicanegron.com/) Call now and leave a voicemail (512) 333-0471 Thank you to all of our supporters on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/latinoswholunch) and Paypal (http://www.latinoswholunch.com/donate) Buy the ABCs of Latinidad Coloring book (https://thewritersblock.org/?q=h.tviewer&qsb=keyword&qse=ZzjQjUtIw2ckZaqLBU_Zqg&using_sb=status)
1 hr 26 min
All the Books!
All the Books!
Book Riot
E294: New Releases and More for January 19, 2021
This week, Liberty and Tirzah discuss The Rib King, Last Night at the Telegraph Club, Remote Control, and more great books. Pick up an All the Books! 200th episode commemorative item here. Subscribe to All the Books! using RSS, iTunes, or Spotify and never miss a book. Sign up for the weekly New Books! newsletter for even more new book news. This post contains affiliate links. When you buy through these links, Book Riot may earn a commission. BOOKS DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW: The Rib King: A Novel by Ladee Hubbard Last Night at the Telegraph Club by Malinda Lo Remote Control by Nnedi Okorafor  Amari and the Night Brothers by B. B. Alston Knock Knock by Anders Roslund   This Will Be Funny Someday by Katie Henry Floaters: Poems by Martín Espada Winterkeep by Kristin Cashore The Album of Dr. Moreau by Daryl Gregory WHAT WE’RE READING: The Survivors by Jane Harper The Hidden Palace: A Tale of the Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker MORE BOOKS OUT THIS WEEK: Have I Ever Told You Black Lives Matter by Shani King Pianos and Flowers: Brief Encounters of the Romantic Kind by Alexander McCall Smith  Bad Medicine: Catching New York’s Deadliest Pill Pusher by Charlotte Bismuth Homo Irrealis: Essays by André Aciman  Faust, Part One : A New Translation with Illustrations by Johann Wolfgang van Goethe, Zsuzsanna Ozsváth (translator) The Forever Sea by Joshua Phillip Johnson From the Moon I Watched Her by Emily English Medley Cast in Firelight by Dana Swift Maafa by Harmony Holiday The Plague Cycle: The Unending War Between Humanity and Infectious Disease by Charles Kenny Wench by Maxine Kaplan     Harnessing Grief: A Mother’s Quest for Meaning and Miracles by Maria J. Kefalas Enjoy the View by Sarah Morgenthaler Before She Disappeared: A Novel by Lisa Gardner The Conjure-Man Dies by Rudolph Fisher The City of Tears by Kate Mosse Your Corner Dark by Desmond Hall The Comeback: A Figure Skating Novel by E. L. Shen Ambitious Girl by Meena Harris and Marissa Valdez The Mask of Mirrors by M. A. Carrick Happy Singles Day by Ann Marie Walker The Black Panther Party: A Graphic Novel History by David F. Walker, Marcus Kwame Anderson With Her Fist Raised: Dorothy Pitman Hughes and the Transformative Power of Black Community Activism by Laura L. Lovett Hall of Smoke by H. M. Long Girl on the Line by Faith Gardner The Crown in Crisis: Countdown to the Abdication by Alexander Larman  The World Turned Upside Down: A History of the Chinese Cultural Revolution by Yang Jisheng, Stacy Mosher (translator), Guo Jian (translator)   Shipped by Angie Hockman  A Brief History of Artificial Intelligence: What It Is, Where We Are, and Where We Are Going by Michael Wooldridge  Wider Than the Sky by Katherine Field Rothschild Sonic Boom: The Impossible Rise of Warner Bros. Records, from Hendrix to Fleetwood Mac to Madonna to Prince by Peter Ames Carlin  The Broken Spine (A Beloved Bookroom Mystery Book 1) by Dorothy St. James  Craft in the Real World: Rethinking Fiction Writing and Workshopping by Matthew Salesses Eagle Down: The Last Special Forces Fighting the Forever War by Jessica Donati  The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine by Janice P. Nimura  Borderlands Curanderos: The Worlds of Santa Teresa Urrea and Don Pedrito Jaramillo by Jennifer Koshatka Seman Shiver by Allie Reynolds A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman Sanctuary: A Memoir by Emily Rapp Black The Divines: A Novel by Ellie Eaton The Merciful by Jon Sealy  Reel Bay: A Cinematic Essay by Jana Larson Trio by William Boyd The African Lookbook: A Visual History of 100 Years of African Women by Catherine E. McKinley The Lives of Lucian Freud: Fame, 1968-2011 by William Feaver At the Edge of the Haight by Katherine Seligman Playing with Fire by April Henry If I Tell You the Truth by Jasmin Kaur Pity Party by Kathleen Lane A Complicated Love Story Set in Space by Shaun David Hutchinson From Here to There: Inventions That Changed the Way the World Moves by Vivian Kirkfield and Gilbert Ford My Grandmother’s Braid by Alina Bronsky, Tim Mohr (translator)  Last Orgy of the Divine Hermit by Mark Leyner Infinitum: An Afrofuturist Tale by Tim Fielder We Free the Stars (Sands of Arawiya) by Hafsah Faizal  Aftershock: A Novel by T.J. Mitchell, Judy Melinek Coming Out Stories: Personal Experiences of Coming Out from Across the LGBTQ+ Spectrum edited by Emma Goswell and Sam Walker See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
45 min
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check with Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren
System Check
10: Political Violence Is No Anomaly in American History
Georgia made history this week: The state elected a Black Senator on Tuesday for the first time ever. Rev. Raphael Warnock, a Morehouse graduate who serves as senior pastor of the storied Ebenezer Baptist Church once pastored by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., will be representing Georgia in the Senate as soon as the results are certified. Along with the win of his fellow Georgian, Jon Ossoff, the Senate will effectively be in Democratic hands, as will the House and the Presidency. Sadly, a different kind of history was also made this week, when an angry, violent, mob of mostly white Trump supporters broke into the Capitol on Wednesday, smashing windows, destroying private offices and violating public spaces. With encouragement from the man occupying the highest office in the land, the mob forced our elected representatives to flee the House and Senate floors as they were undertaking the constitutionally mandated certification of the 2020 presidential election. The people who perpetrated this attack against our democracy were fueled by misinformation, much of it coming from the President himself: That dead people had voted, that voting machines had somehow switched votes, that the election was rigged and widespread fraud had handed Biden the presidency. But they were also acting on another kind of misinformation, another kind of lie—a lie that erases the genius and the contributions of Black people, a lie that ignores the fact that it was Black hands that made America what it is, that unpaid Black labor built the very buildings that serve as the seat of our democracy (https://www.aoc.gov/explore-capitol-campus/art/slave-labor-commemorative-marker) . They were fueled by the lie that is white supremacy. If we are to move beyond the gridlock that has been our political fate for years, we need to face up to this lie embedded deep within our entire public life. On this week’s show, your hosts Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren undertake a system check of the very foundation of our politics. Our guest and guide this week is Hasan Kwame Jeffries, associate professor of history at The Ohio State University where he teaches courses on the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. He reminds us that the violence we saw at the Capitol this week is not an anomaly—in fact, political violence is what birthed this nation. The American Revolution, the Civil War, the brutal suppression of Reconstruction and the stiff resistance to the Civil Rights Movement, political violence has long been used to perpetuate white supremacy in this country. And too often, Black agency and emancipation has been bartered away to avoid further political violence. But Prof. Jeffries points us toward a way to hold people—whether they’re the people who stormed the Capitol or the politicians who egged them on—accountable for their political violence, and a way to recognizing and honoring the full contributions that Black Americans have made to our republic. Our final word this week goes to Professor Blair Kelley, Associate Professor of History at North Carolina State University. System Check listeners will remember Prof. Kelley from episode 2, in which she gave us a deeply personal perspective on voter suppression (https://www.thenation.com/podcast/politics/voting-election-electoral-college/) —this week, she reminds us of all the working class Black folks who have asserted their right to participate in a political system that more often than not thwarted and devalued their input. It is our task to honor their legacy. System Checklist Transforming analysis into action, the System Check Team gives listeners three action items this week: Take Action: The politicians who aided and abetted this week’s assault on democracy must be held accountable. Prof. Hasan Kwame Jeffries’s brother, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (https://twitter.com/RepJeffries/status/1347245549188239360?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Etweet) , is one of a chorus of politicians who came out today demanding President Trump’s removal from office. Add your name as a co-signer of Rep. Cori Bush’s bill to investigate and expel members of congress who fomented the storming of the Capitol (https://gopcoup.com/) , and help shift the balance of power in the Senate, that most unequal of institutions, by telling your representatives to make Washington, DC the 51st state (https://statehood.dc.gov/page/contact-congress#/3/) . Get Informed: How do we fight misinformation? By educating ourselves. This week’s political violence didn’t come out of nowhere (https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/proud-boys-capitol/) , it’s a clear response to the progressive political gains made this year, facilitated by the work of Black women from Stacey Abrams all the way back to Fannie Lour Hamer (https://www.thenation.com/article/politics/black-women-voting-rights/) . Check out Prof. Jeffries’s moving TedTalk (https://www.ted.com/talks/hasan_kwame_jeffries_why_we_must_confront_the_painful_parts_of_us_history/transcript?language=en#t-95967) , mentioned in today’s show. Listen to Rev. Raphael Warnock’s speech (https://www.11alive.com/article/news/politics/elections/raphael-warnock-georgia-senate-runoff-statement/507-43edf954-2b32-4730-a035-fde09b50f2b5) after his defeat of Sen. Kelly Loeffler to learn how the son of a woman who picked someone else’s cotton could become a US Senator. Watch: And while you’re at it, treat yourself to Elizabeth Alexander’s full reading of “Praise Song for the Day” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vLBnFk-OFc) at the 2009 inauguration of Barack Obama. As always, we welcome your additions to our Checklist! Use our Twitter (https://twitter.com/SystemCheckPod) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/SystemCheckPod/) pages to add your comments, suggested actions, and organizations to support. And if you like the show, subscribe on Apple Podcasts (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/system-check/id1536830138) , Spotify (https://open.spotify.com/show/0vI1wNUVfYbZXMIM6nciaX?si=VoRgIzndRVG4Xw_rQNGKmQ) , or wherever you get your podcasts for new episodes every Friday. System Check is a project of The Nation magazine, hosted by Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren and produced by Sophia Steinert-Evoy. Support for System Check comes from Omidyar Network, a social change venture that is reimagining how capitalism should work. Learn more about their efforts to recenter our economy around individuals, community, and societal well-being at Omidyar.com (http://omidyar.com/) . Our executive producer is Frank Reynolds. Our theme music is by Brooklyn-based artist and producer Jachary (https://jachary.bandcamp.com/) . Subscribe to The Nation to support all of our podcasts: http://thenation.com/systemchecksubs.
35 min
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