Yang Speaks
Yang Speaks
Jan 18, 2021
Humanity, justice, and our future - Amanda Knox joins.
Play • 1 hr 19 min

Andrew was recently a guest on Amanda Knox and Christopher Robinson's new podcast, "Labyrinths." Tune in to their conversation about Andrew's role as a husband and father, the criminal justice system, UBI, and more.

Watch this conversation on YouTube: https://youtu.be/xOUWw1YF-h0

Follow Amanda Knox: https://twitter.com/amandaknox | https://www.instagram.com/amamaknox

Follow Christopher Robinson: https://twitter.com/manunderbridge | https://www.instagram.com/emcee_carbon

Follow Andrew Yang: https://instagram.com/andrewyang | https://twitter.com/AndrewYang

Follow Zach Graumann: https://instagram.com/zachgraumann | https://twitter.com/Zach_Graumann

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The Strong Towns Podcast
The Strong Towns Podcast
Strong Towns
Rep. Jake Auchincloss & Rep. Mike Gallagher: How Congress Can Support Local Leaders and Get the Economy Going (Video)
Strong Towns advocates believe the way to grow stronger and more financially resilient towns and cities—and, by extension, a stronger, more resilient country—is from the bottom up. A bottom-up approach is one that meets the actual needs of residents. It taps into the energy and creativity that already exists in our communities. It is sensitive and responsive to feedback. (“This is working. That isn’t. Let’s hit the gas here, and pump the brakes there.”) It relies on small, incremental investments (little bets) instead of large, transformative projects. And it is obsessed with running the numbers, as Strong Towns founder and president Chuck Marohn wrote when describing the Strong Towns approach: “If we’re not doing the math, if we’re not asking the hard financial questions with each step we take, we’re doing a disservice to our fellow residents and the future generations who will inherit our choices.” While much of this bottom-up work is happening at the local level, there is an important role for the federal government. This week we’re excited to welcome to the Strong Towns podcast two U.S. representatives to talk about just that. Both are longtime Strong Towns readers, and they are thinking deeply about how Congress can strengthen towns and cities and get the economy moving again. Rep. Jake Auchincloss is a Democrat representing Massachusetts’s 4th congressional district. After graduating from Harvard College, Auchincloss joined the Marines. He commanded infantry in Afghanistan and special operations in Panama, and he's now a major in the reserves. After returning home, he served on the City Council in Newton, Massachusetts. Auchincloss was elected to Congress in 2020 and serves on The House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure. Rep. Mike Gallagher is a Republican representing Wisconsin’s 8th congressional district. Gallagher is a Marine veteran, serving for seven years on active duty and earning the rank of Captain. After earning his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University, Gallagher went on to earn a master’s degree in Security Studies from Georgetown University, a second in Strategic Intelligence from National Intelligence University, and his PhD in International Relations from Georgetown. Prior to getting elected to Congress in 2016, he worked in the private sector at a global energy and supply chain management company in Green Bay. Rep. Gallagher serves on the House Armed Services Committee and, with Rep. Auchincloss, on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee. In this episode of the podcast—which we’re also releasing below on video and in transcript—Chuck Marohn talks with the congressmen about the challenges facing communities in their home districts and around the country. They discuss the push in Washington for a big infrastructure bill, whether a tension exists between infrastructure spending as economic stimulus and infrastructure spending as smart long-term investment, and the growing consensus to address the nation’s mountain of backlogged maintenance projects. They also talk about how the federal government can support smaller projects that may be less sexy but actually have a high ROI, why mayors and city councils must be empowered to make the decisions right for their communities, and much, much more. Additional Show Notes * Rep. Jake Auchincloss (Website) * Rep. Jake Auchincloss (Twitter) * Rep. Mike Gallagher (Website) * Rep. Mike Gallagher (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * The House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure * Recent Strong Towns content related to this episode: * “The Strong Towns Approach to Public Investment,” by Charles Marohn * “The Act Like You INVEST In America Act,” by Charles Marohn * “What Can We Hope For from a Mayor Pete D.O.T.?” (Podcast) * “The Great GASB!” by Joe Minicozzi * “A Better Use of Federal Infrastructure Spending” (Podcast) * “The Worst Possible Thing We Can Do With This Money” (Podcast) * “If We’re Not Going to Maintain What We Have, Then Why Bother Building Anything New?” by Charles Marohn * “You Were Mentioned on the Floor of Congress,” by John Pattison * “#NoNewRoads Gains Traction in D.C.”
53 min
A Matter of Degrees
A Matter of Degrees
Leah Stokes, Katharine Wilkinson
The ‘Darth Vader’ of Electric Utilities
In 2013, a series of attack ads blitzed television sets across Arizona. They warned of a dire threat to senior citizens. Who was the villain? Solar energy. These ads came from front groups funded by Arizona Public Service, the state’s largest utility. It was part of a years-long fight against rooftop solar that turned ugly. “I mean, for Star Wars fans, APS became the Darth Vader of electric utilities in America. I mean, I think you would be hard-pressed to find a utility that behaved as badly as APS did in the last decade,” explains former regulator Kris Mayes. But APS isn’t alone. It’s a prime example of how monopoly utilities abuse their power to influence regulatory decisions and slow clean-energy progress. What happens if your electric utility starts doing things you don’t agree with? What if they start attacking solar and proposing to build more and more fossil gas plants? What if they actively resist clean energy progress? Well, you don’t get a choice. You have to buy electricity, and you have to buy it from them. As a customer you’re funding that. In this episode, we’ll detail how it happened in Arizona -- and how public pressure forced APS’ to come clean. Featured in this episode: Ryan Randazzo, Kris Mayes, David Pomerantz. Follow our co-hosts and production team: * Leah Stokes * Katharine Wilkinson * Stephen Lacey * Jaime Kaiser A Matter of Degrees is a production of Post Script Audio. For more episodes and transcripts, visit our website.
52 min
Model Citizen
Model Citizen
Will Wilkinson
Richard Florida on the Post-Pandemic City
This episode marks the beginning of a new chapter for Model Citizen. With the power of a single mighty tweet, I've broken off the shackles of formal institutional affiliation. So we're on our own. Let's just say it's been a hell of a week. In that time, I've launched a daily newsletter, also called Model Citizen, which I've integrated with this podcast. If you'd like to support me, and the burgeoning Model Citizen media empire, please consider subscribing at modelcitizen.substack.com. It's just $5.99 a month. In addition to thought-provoking writing delivered straight to your inbox, subscribers get audio versions of articles, special episodes of the Model Citizen podcast and more. But on with the show! This week's guest, Richard Florida, is one of our leading authorities on cities and urban life. Richard is author of a shelf of books, including the _Rise of the Creative Class_ and, most recently, the _New Urban Crisis_. In this episode, we talk about the extent to which work-from-home arrangements will or won't stick after the pandemic, whether San Francisco faces the fate of urban powerhouses of yesteryear, like Pittsburgh and Detroit, how self-reinforcing selection effects have made academia stifling, and more. Richard Florida is University Professor at the University of Toronto's School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, as well as a Distinguished Fellow at NYU's Schack School of Real Estate. And, as you'll see, he's also a hell of a nice guy. Readings The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida Who’s Your City by Richard Florida Jason Rentfrow’s Google Scholar page Triumph of the City by Ed Glaeser Jonathan Miller on Real Estate after the Pandemic, Bloomberg Masters in Business podcast Prison Notebooks by Antonio Gramsci Subscribe to the Model Citizen newsletter http://modelcitizen.substack.com/subscribe Credits Host: Will Wilkinson (@willwilkinson) Music: Dig Deep by RW Smith
49 min
The MMT Podcast with Patricia Pino & Christian Reilly
The MMT Podcast with Patricia Pino & Christian Reilly
Patricia Pino & Christian Reilly
#89 Warren Mosler & Phil Armstrong: Weimar Republic Hyperinflation Through An MMT Lens (part 2)
Part 2: Patricia and Christian talk to MMT founder Warren Mosler and MMT scholar Dr Phil Armstrong about their recent paper: “Weimar Republic Hyperinflation through a Modern Monetary Theory Lens”.   Part 1 of this conversation: https://www.patreon.com/posts/episode-88-phil-47638591   Please help sustain this podcast! Patrons get early access to all episodes and patron-only episodes: https://www.patreon.com/MMTpodcast   For an intro to MMT: Listen to our first three episodes: https://www.patreon.com/posts/41742417   All our episodes in chronological order: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43111643   All of our episodes with Warren Mosler: https://www.patreon.com/posts/42918786   All of our episodes with Phil Armstrong: https://www.patreon.com/posts/42072846   Some of our other episodes with Warren Mosler which deal with inflation, interest rates and central bank policy: Episode 59: What Do Central Banks Do?: https://www.patreon.com/posts/39070023 Episode 80: MMT Holiday Special (part 1): https://www.patreon.com/posts/45281376 Episode 81: MMT Holiday Special (part 2): https://www.patreon.com/posts/episode-81-mmt-2-45555840   Our episode 65 with Phil Armstrong on inflation (more on Paul Volcker as Fed chair in the intro): https://www.patreon.com/posts/40672678   Our episode 47 with Pavlina Tcherneva explaining the Job Guarantee: https://www.patreon.com/posts/36034543   Our episode 55 with Dr Dirk Ehnts on MMT in the context of the Eurozone: https://www.patreon.com/posts/38252014   Our episodes with Sam Levey that touch on the forward pricing channel: Episode 43: https://www.patreon.com/posts/35073683 Episode 76: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43697752 Episode 77: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43886189   Weimar Republic Hyperinflation through a Modern Monetary Theory Lens by Phil Armstrong and Warren Mosler: http://moslereconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Weimar-Republic-Hyperinflation-through-a-Modern-Monetary-Theory-Lens.pdf   Warren Mosler - MMT white paper: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gvDcMU_ko1h5TeVjQL8UMJW9gmKY1x0zcqKIRTZQDAQ/edit   Michael Hudson - Government Debt and Deficits Are Not the Problem. Private Debt Is: https://michael-hudson.com/2013/03/government-debt-and-deficits-are-not-the-problem-private-debt-is/   Clint Ballinger - Airplane crashes aren’t “hyperlandings”: https://clintballinger.wordpress.com/2020/04/30/airplane-crashes-arent-hyperlandings-notes-on-zimbabwe/   A Discussion of Central Bank Operations and Interest Rate Policy by Warren Mosler and Phil Armstrong: https://gimms.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Central-Bank-Interest-Rate-Policy-Mosler-Armstrong.pdf   Monopoly Money: The State as a Price Setter by Pavlina R. Tcherneva: http://moslereconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/Tcherneva_MonopolyMoney_2002.pdf   Bill Mitchell - Zimbabwe for hyperventilators 101: http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=3773   Tickets for “An Introduction To Modern Monetary Theory: Reconceptualising The Nature Of Banking” (presentation by Phil Armstrong) on 26th March 2021, organised by Women in Banking and Finance: https://www.wibf.org.uk/events/details/modern-monetary-theory   A list of other upcoming MMT events and courses: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47531455   A list of MMT-informed campaigns and organisations worldwide: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47900757   Phil Armstrong’s book, Can Heterodox Economics Make a Difference?: https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/gbp/can-heterodox-economics-make-a-difference-9781800370883.html   Warren Mosler’s (free) e-book, Seven Deadly Innocent Frauds Of Economic Policy: http://moslereconomics.com/wp-content/powerpoints/7DIF.pdf   Transcript for opening monologue: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47905062   We are working towards full transcripts, but in the meantime, closed captions for all episodes are available on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEp_nGVTuMfBun2wiG-c0Ew/videos   Show notes: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47904999
1 hr 4 min
Cannabis Investing Network
Cannabis Investing Network
CIN Podcast
#81 - Don't Sell the Winners (ft. Todd Harrison of CB1 Capital)
We are joined by a special guest, Todd Harrison, who is the founding Partner and Chief Investment Officer of CB1 Capital. Todd is also an advisor for the prolific big board listed ETF MSOS which now has over $1B in assets. Todd is a seasoned professional who has over +30 years on Wall Street managing risk and researching financial market strategies. Todd is also quickly becoming one of the "go-to" investment voices in the cannabis industry. You can find him on Twitter (@todd_harrison), read his substack @ Cannabis Confidential or see him on TV educating the public on the cannabis opportunity (links below). This is an action packed episode, where we cover a broad range of topics.   Starting off with he calm before the storm, Todd gives his perspectives into what lays ahead for the cannabis industry, how the ‘big boys’ have not sat at the table and how the Robinhooders have not ‘dipped their arrows’ yet.   Todd gets into the power of the plant, cannabis 3.0, the idea of holding the best companies, how his mindset is evolving and much more. We discuss where both short term and long-term opportunities lie, whether it’s the privates or the public names.  We hope you enjoy this episode and please make sure to DYDD and understand that nothing shared during this interview in considered financial advice. Thanks to Todd for bringing his signature upbeat style combined with financial insights. Companies mentioned:  Verano, Parallel, GTI, Cresco, Columbia Care, AYR Wellness, Curaleaf. Find Todd online: Twitter: https://twitter.com/todd_harrison  Substack Articles: https://toddharrison.substack.com/
50 min
The War on Cars
The War on Cars
Proving Ground Media
The Power of E-Bikes with Congressman Earl Blumenauer
Electric bikes shorten commutes, flatten hills and make cycling accessible to anyone who might need a boost. They’re also great tools for replacing car trips and fighting climate change. Unfortunately, they’re still a little pricey for some people. That could change thanks to a new bill in Congress: the Electric Bicycle Incentive Kickstart for the Environment Act. Co-sponsored by Congressman Earl Blumenauer of Oregon, the E-BIKE Act would offer a tax credit of 30% of the price of an electric bicycle, something that could bring the joys of e-bike ownership within reach of more Americans. Congressman Blumenauer joins The War on Cars to discuss the bill, why commuter benefits ought to apply to bicycle sharing systems, and the economic, environmental and social benefits of bike commuting in general. (Spoiler alert: cyclists typically don’t murder each other over parking.) Plus, he offers his thoughts on Democratic control of the House and Senate and the recent appointment of U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. ***This episode was sponsored in part by our friends at Cleverhood. For 20% off of stylish, functional rain gear designed specifically for walking and biking — and 30% off their new anorak rain jacket — enter coupon code WARONCARS at checkout.*** Support The War on Cars on Patreon and get cool stickers, access to exclusive bonus content and more. SHOW NOTES: Support the E-BIKE Act by contacting your representative in Congress using this handy tool from PeopleForBikes or look up your congressperson and get in touch directly. Get the full details on the E-BIKE Act via BikePortland.org Learn more about Congressman Earl Blumenauer’s life and career. “E-bikes are expensive, but this congressman wants to make them more affordable” (Andrew J. Hawkins, The Verge) “E-Bikes for Everyone!” (David Zipper, Slate) Get the official War on Cars coffee mug and other merch at our store. Rate and Review us on iTunes so more people can find The War on Cars. Sign up for our new newsletter, The Dispatch. This episode was produced and edited by Doug Gordon. Our music is by Nathaniel Goodyear. Our logo is by Dani Finkel of Crucial D. Find us on Twitter: @TheWarOnCars, Doug Gordon @BrooklynSpoke, Sarah Goodyear @buttermilk1, Aaron Naparstek @Naparstek. Questions, comments or suggestions? Email us: thewaroncars@gmail.com TheWarOnCars.org
32 min
Conversations with Tyler
Conversations with Tyler
Mercatus Center at George Mason University
Patricia Fara on Newton, Scientific Progress, and the Benefits of Unhistoric Acts
Patricia Fara is a historian of science at Cambridge University and well-known for her writings on women in science. Her forthcoming book, Life After Gravity: Isaac Newton's London Career, details the life of the titan of the so-called Scientific Revolution after his famous (though perhaps mythological) discovery under the apple tree. Her work emphasizes science as a long, continuous process composed of incremental contributions–in which women throughout history have taken a crucial part–rather than the sole province of a few monolithic innovators. Patricia joined Tyler to discuss why Newton left Cambridge to run The Royal Mint, why he was so productive during the Great Plague, why the “Scientific Revolution” should instead be understood as a gradual process, what the Antikythera device tells us about science in the ancient world, the influence of Erasmus Darwin on his grandson, why more people should know Dorothy Hodgkin, how George Eliot inspired her to commit unhistoric acts, why she opposes any kind of sex-segregated schooling, her early experience in a startup, what modern students of science can learn from studying Renaissance art, the reasons she considers Madame Lavoisier to be the greatest female science illustrator, the unusual work habit brought to her attention by house guests, the book of caricatures she’d like to write next, and more. Follow us on Twitter and IG: @cowenconvos Email: cowenconvos@mercatus.gmu.edu Follow Tyler on Twitter Facebook Newsletter
58 min
Upzoned
Upzoned
Strong Towns
When (If Ever) Should States Preempt Cities?
Strong Towns president Chuck Marohn has said that one change every city should make is to allow the next increment of development intensity by-right—i.e., single-family zoning would now permit duplexes, and so on. But if every city should make that change, does that mean states should come in and make that decision for cities—as Oregon recently did for cities with House Bill 2001? Not necessarily. This week’s episode of the Upzoned podcast is inspired by a recent article in Governing magazine called “States Preempt Cities Almost to the Point of Irrelevance.” In that piece, senior staff writer Alan Greenblatt describes how, over the past decade and across many issues, state governments have preempted local decision-making. For example, Texas, Arizona, Indiana and Louisiana are considering legislation that would prevent cities from reducing police or public safety budgets. Texas governor Greg Abbot went as far as to tweet: “We will defund cities that tried to defund police”. Yet as Greenblatt says, “If states are going to stop cities and counties from adopting their own spending priorities—no matter how misguided they may be—that raises the question of whether localities will be masters of their own fates or merely subservient branch offices of the state.” In this episode, Upzoned host Abby Kinney, an urban planner in Kansas City, and cohost Chuck Marohn talk about the trend of states preempting cities: When (if ever) should states step in to preempt local governments...and when does it become micromanaging? Using examples from California and Missouri, among other states, Chuck and Abby discuss where decisions should be made, the principle of subsidiarity, the consequences of “removing dynamism from the system,” and the rude awakening may experience when a tool (state preemption) used to push through a policy they like is later used to force a policy change they don’t. They also talk about those times when state preemption might make sense—and how they can be kept under control. Then in the Downzone, Chuck talks about a book he at least gave a shot. And Abby describes a recent homeowner’s scare involving frozen water pipes, a subsequent water leak, and an electrical box. Additional Show Notes * “States Preempt Cities Almost to the Point of Irrelevance,” by Alan Greenblatt * Abby Kinney (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Gould Evans Studio for City Design * Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) * Strong Towns content related to this episode: * “When should the state jump in to address local problems?” by Spencer Gardner * “Accessory Dwelling Units Rock. But Should States Be Overriding Cities' Laws About Building Them?” (Podcast) * “Do Property Tax Caps Help or Hurt Communities?" * “Mapping the Effects of California's Prop 13,” by Connor Nielsen * “The Local Case for Reparations,” by Charles Marohn
35 min
Columbia Energy Exchange
Columbia Energy Exchange
ColumbiaUEnergy
What’s Next for Energy Policy and Technology
Climate change is a top priority for the new Biden administration, starting with a slew of early executive orders signed during President Biden’s first week in office. In this “whole-of-government” approach to climate change, the Department of Energy is a key player not only in policy, but also basic research, commercialization, and deployment of new clean energy technologies which will be critical to get on a pathway to deep decarbonization. In this edition of Columbia Energy Exchange, host Jason Bordoff is joined by Dr. Arun Majumdar to discuss the outlook for energy technology and climate policy under the Biden administration. Dr. Arun Majumdar is a Professor at Stanford University, a faculty member of the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering and former Director and Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University. He served as the Founding Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E), and also served for a year as the Acting Under Secretary of Energy under President Obama. After leaving Washington, Arun was the Vice President for Energy at Google. He also led the energy agency review team for the Biden-Harris Presidential Transition, which covered the Department of Energy, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Arun received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.
55 min
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