Unorthodox
Unorthodox
Nov 26, 2020
A Little Bit of Turkey and Latkes: Ep. 252
Play • 22 min

This week, a mini-holiday mashup. First, associate producer Robert Scaramuccia brings us the story of Aaron Hartman, a Jewish man from Atlanta, GA with Williams Syndrome, and his very unique pandemic birthday present.


We also bring you a Hanukkah gift guide that includes products our listeners make themselves! Find these suggestions and more by joining our Facebook group.


Join the hosts Wednesday, Dec. 2 at 7 p.m. E.S.T. for the Museum of Jewish Heritage’s Generation to Generation event, which is honoring the Butnick family. Stephanie will be interviewing Michael Zegen from The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, and the band Golem will be performing. Register at bit.ly/butnickfam.


Celebrate the first night of Hanukkah with Stephanie, Mayim Bialik, and G.L.O.W. star Jackie Tohn at NuRoots’ “First Night” event, Thursday, Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. P.S.T. Register at  nuroots.org/firstnight.


Let us know what you think of the show! Send us comments and questions at unorthodox@tabletmag.com, or leave us a voicemail at (914) 570-4869. You can also record a voice memo on your smartphone and email it to us.

Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get new episodes, photos, and more.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at our recording sessions on our YouTube channel! Follow Unorthodox on Twitter and Instagram.

Get your Unorthodox T-shirts, mugs, and baby onesies at bit.ly/unorthoshirt.


Shalom, friends

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Model Citizen
Model Citizen
Will Wilkinson, Niskanen Center, Christopher Federico
Why Right-Wing Media Loves Lies
I never thought I'd see a seditious mob of Americans sack the Capitol building as Congress counted electoral votes. But, then again, I never thought the president of the United States would turn out to be a malignant narcissist who lies about everything all the time. The insurrectionists who sacked the capitol were fueled by lies. One thing that struck me when Trump became president was how other Republican officials didn't seem to care all the much that he lied all the time. By the end of his presidency, practically the entire GOP was willing to enthusiastically embrace Trump's biggest lie yet: that he'd won an election he obviously lost. And, of course, right wing media was there the entire time, amplifying and spreading Trump's lies, whether they were petty vanities or outright seditious. Partisan bias is one thing. Blaring propaganda like a foghorn, completely indifferent to the truth, is different animal altogether. That's why I wanted to talk to my old friend Matthew Sheffield. Matthew was one of the founders of Newsbusters, one of the first conservative sites to devote itself entirely to the exposing liberal media bias and left-wing "fake news." At a certain point, the scales fell from Matthew's eyes and he realized that the mainstream media was at least trying to tell truth, but the right-wing media wasn't trying to do anything at all but stick it to left. I think the inside perspective is critical here. One of the biggest biases of the mainstream media is ignorance of the way the conservative media and messaging machine actually works. Matthew really knows what he's talking about. In addition to founding Newsbuster, he was the founding online managing editor of the Washington Examiner. More recently, he's covered the right and rightwing media for Salon, hosts a podcast called Theory of Change and has written a series of penetrating Twitter threads about the conservative media ecosystem that have earned him interviews on a bunch of radio shows as well as the New York Times. Readings NYT interview with Matthew Sheffield Twitter thread on right-wing media Twitter thread on meaning, loss and Christian supremacism in modern conservatism How Right-Wing Media Fuels the Political Divide, On Point, WBUR - Boston Matthew Sheffield's Theory of Change Podcast Credits Host: Will Wilkinson (@willwilkinson) Audio engineer: Ray Ingegneri Music: Dig Deep by RW Smith Model Citizen is a production of the Niskanen Center (@niskanencenter) To support this podcast or any of the Niskanen Center's programs, visit: https://niskanencenter.org/donate
1 hr 47 min
The Strong Towns Podcast
The Strong Towns Podcast
Strong Towns
Gabrielle Gurley: For Transit, "The Cuts are Coming"
Most American transit systems were fragile before the pandemic—struggling for revenue, dependent for survival on federal money, inadequate fares, debt, and, in some cases, donations from local businesses. The pandemic has exacerbated these problems and turned existing transit models on their heads. In late December, Gabrielle Gurley, a deputy editor at The American Prospect, wrote an article about how transit systems have responded to the pandemic. “Most operators have mastered the virus precautions, requiring masks, social distancing, and deep-cleaning and disinfecting,” she wrote. “Some have coped better than others, though, in rethinking how to serve passengers who are no longer living in 9-to-5 worlds, and accepting the new realities about how to retain and secure funding at a time when Republican elected officials have blocked any federal response since last spring.” A survey last fall found the majority of transit agencies plan to cut service to close funding gaps. Gurley is our guest on this week’s episode of the Strong Towns podcast. She talks with host Chuck Marohn, founder and president of Strong Towns, about the convulsive effects 2020 had on American transit systems, how the transit experience has changed, and why the politics of transit funding is so challenging. They also discuss the cuts many agencies have planned (or have already implemented), how transit funding reflects what we value as a society, and how the pandemic will change spending priorities from expansion to taking care of basics. As Gurley says, “As nice as it would be to have a spiffy, high-speed train going from DC to New York in two hours…maybe we fix the [leaky] tunnel first.” Additional Show Notes * “Public Transportation in Crisis, by Gabrielle Gurley” * Other articles by Gabrielle Gurley at The American Prospect * Gabrielle Gurley (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * The Strong Towns Local-Motive Tour * Select Strong Towns content on transit: * “New York transit is facing "Doomsday" cuts. Should non-New Yorkers bail it out?” by Charles Marohn * “For U.S. Transit, "Death Spiral" Shouldn't Have Been an Option in the First Place” (Podcast) * “In Transportation Costs, ‘It's the System, Stupid.’" by Daniel Herriges * “Can a High-Speed Rail Network Electrify the U.S. Economy?” (Podcast) * “The Only Thing More Expensive Than Saving Transit is Not Saving Transit,” by Daniel Herriges
55 min
Jewish History Matters
Jewish History Matters
Jason Lustig
61: The Blood Libel Accusation with Magda Teter
Magda Teter joins us to discuss the history of the blood libel accusation and its continued relevance. Listen in for a wide-ranging conversation about the history of the blood libel, its origin and how it has transformed over the century, and what it tells us about misinformation and how it spreads. Magda Teter is Professor of History and the Shvidler Chair of Judaic Studies at Fordham University. She is the author of numerous books, most recently Blood Libel: On the Trail of An Antisemitic Myth (Harvard, 2020), which we’ll talk about today. You can also check out the accompanying website, www.thebloodlibeltrail.org, where you can explore the book as well as fascinating maps and other related media about the antisemitic myth. The blood libel is one of the long-standing false accusations against the Jews, the myth—in different variations—that Jews murdered Christian children and used their blood for various rituals. It’s obviously, patently false, and yet it has persisted across nearly a thousand years. From medieval England to modern Nazi antisemitism and beyond, we see the imagery of the blood libel persists - even in new forms like the conspiracy theories of QAnon. As Magda Teter argues, these accusations became a vehicle for different anxieties about Jews, and about the world at large. And further, it was the printing press which enabled the proliferation and persistence of these false myths and disinformation, which when published allowed them both to spread more widely and also gave them an air of “respectability” because they existed in print. This allows us to think deeply about the role of media technologies—both in medieval and early modern Europe, and also more recently with the internet—as avenues not for the spread of information, but misinformation.
1 hr 4 min
Wrong About Everything
Wrong About Everything
Wrong About Everything
WRONG ABOUT DEAN PHILLIPS: Insurrection at the Capitol
How do we follow up one of our best episodes all time? With one that is possibly better. We were honored that Congressman Dean Phillips (DFL-3) agreed to come on the show to share his account from inside House Chambers during the Capitol Insurrection. Rep Phillips shared new detail about his infamous shout across the aisle, as well as a personal revelation he had in that moment. We send our gratitude to Congressman Phillips for his service to our country and for having the courage to share his humanity on our show. We could use more guys like that. (sorry for such a puff piece write up, but damn...the guy really blew us away. Please consider supporting this show's mission to help bring back bipartisanship through real political discourse. Our Country needs it more than ever...Thank you for watching/listening. as a bonus, you get some cool benefits and prizes, including your membership into our “not a dick” hall of fame: patreon.com/wrongabouteverythingpodcast please support our sponsors! if you need a place to store your money, join the thousands of Minnesotans who have saved money with less fees and lower loan rates by joining a MN Credit Union. To learn more: mncun.org if you are injured in an accident or due to someone else’s negligence, we strongly recommend looking up the great Michael Bryant at Bradshaw & Bryant: mnpersonalinjury.com If you need help with a podcast, video, or livestream, message them at info@mbcmulticast.com or visit their site at mbcmulticast.com
1 hr 9 min
Unpacking Israeli History
Unpacking Israeli History
Unpacked Media
Gush Katif: When Jews expelled Jews
In the final episode of the season, Noam Weissman delves into one of the most divisive events in Israel’s history — the disengagement from the Gaza Strip. He looks at the historical context, the political and religious debate leading up to the pull-out, the trauma it caused for Israelis, the effect that the disengagement had on the peace process and whether the results were worth the suffering it caused. ~~~~ The Unpacking Israeli History Podcast series is sponsored by Andrea and Larry Gill This episode is sponsored by Dr. Neil and Pam Weissman ~~~~ Learn more about Unpacked: https://unpacked.media/ Visit Unpacked on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/unpacked Teaching about this topic? Check out our relevant educator resources here: https://unpacked.education/video/israels-disengagement-from-gaza/ ~~~~ Sources * https://www.haaretz.com/1.4682702 * https://www.jewishhistory.org/sinai-again/ * http://www.itamarrabinovich.tau.ac.il/publications/127-bold-decisions-three-israeli-prime-ministers-who-went-against-their-grain.html * https://www.haaretz.com/1.4682702 * http://www.israelnationalnews.com/Articles/Article.aspx/5347 * https://www.jta.org/1978/09/27/archive/behind-the-headlines-the-fate-of-yamit * https://www.jpost.com/Arab-Israeli-Conflict/Former-chief-of-staff-Ariel-Sharon-designed-Gaza-disengagement-to-save-West-Bank-settlements-412213 * https://www.jpost.com/Arab-Israeli-Conflict/Former-chief-of-staff-Ariel-Sharon-designed-Gaza-disengagement-to-save-West-Bank-settlements-412213 * https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/gaza-disengagement/ * https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/gz.html * https://www.terrorism-info.org.il/en/18536/ * https://history.state.gov/milestones/1993-2000/oslo * https://imeu.org/article/what-is-the-palestinian-authority * https://www.counterpunch.org/2005/07/09/the-war-of-the-colors-in-israel/ * https://reason.com/archives/2005/07/08/israels-color-war * https://www.timesofisrael.com/housing-prices-continue-upward-climb-state-report-shows/ * https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/12/29/507377617/seven-things-to-know-about-israeli-settlements * https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ariel-Sharon * https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/jcs/article/view/220/378 * https://www.theguardian.com/world/2000/dec/10/israel * http://www.mfa.gov.il/MFA/ForeignPolicy/Peace/MFADocuments/Pages/Disengagement%20Plan%20-%20General%20Outline.aspx * https://www.reuters.com/article/us-israel-gaza-disengagement-insight/shadow-of-israels-pullout-from-gaza-hangs-heavy-10-years-on-idUSKCN0QF1QQ20150810 * https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/a-decade-later-israelis-see-gaza-pullout-as-big-mistake/2015/08/14/21c06518-3480-11e5-b835-61ddaa99c73e_story.html * https://www.timesofisrael.com/ten-years-of-limbo-gush-katif-evacuees-still-in-trailers/ * https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxqHStC9hMI * https://forward.com/news/israel/318228/gaza-withdrawal-10-years-later/ ~~~~ Unpacked is a division of OpenDor Media
27 min
Upzoned
Upzoned
Strong Towns
The Problem with Creating “Slow Streets” Too Fast
In the first few months of the pandemic, many towns and cities moved quickly to create “slow streets,” streets that restricted vehicle access in order to make room for socially distanced walking, biking, play, etc. While the thinking behind those adaptations may have been justified, the speed with which they were implemented often came at the expense of meaningful public engagement and buy-in from residents. As Laura Bliss writes in a recent article for Bloomberg CityLab, slow streets have drawn “controversy, community resistance and comparisons with racist urban planning practices of earlier decades.” Bliss quotes Corinne Kisner, the executive director of the National Association of City Transportation Officials, who said, “I think there’s a tension between planners wanting to act fast, because their work is so critical to reduce fatalities and greenhouse gas emissions — the reasons for this work are so compelling and historic. But the urgency to move fast is in conflict with the speed of trust, and the pace that actually allows for input from everyone who’s affected by these decisions.” This article is the topic of this week's episode of Upzoned -- our first episode of 2021 and our 100th episode overall -- with host Abby Kinney, an urban planner from Kansas City, and regular co-host Chuck Marohn, the founder and president of Strong Towns. Abby and Chuck discuss why improving how streets and public spaces are utilized isn’t worth much if you get the process wrong. (“Robert Moses tactics can’t achieve Jane Jacobs goals.”) They also contrast the one-size-fits-all solutions that create resentment with the benefits of iiterative, truly collaborative approaches. Then in the Downzone, Chuck talks about finishing The Queen’s Gambit on Netflix and recommends a blockbuster new religion podcast by a hometown host. And Abby talks about why climbing is the best sport for understanding incrementalism. Oh, and also about skydiving, which prompted Chuck to recommend this video. Additional Show Notes * “‘Slow Streets’ Disrupted City Planning. What Comes Next?” by Laura Bliss * Robert Moses Tactics Can’t Achieve Jane Jacobs Goals * Abby Kinney (Twitter) * Charles Marohn (Twitter) * Gould Evans Studio for City Design * Theme Music by Kemet the Phantom (Soundcloud) * Select Strong Towns content on “Slow Streets” and “Open Streets” * “Oakland’s Open Streets Programs Are Still a Work in Progress. That’s a Good Thing.” by Daniel Herriges * “The Bottom-Up Revolution is... Working Together to Make a Street for People” (Podcast) * “How’s that temporary street redesign your city started this spring doing now?” by Rachel Quednau * “The Evolving 2020 Open Streets Movement, or What if We Threw Out the Rule Book and Everything Was Fine? By Daniel Herriges * “Hearing One Engineer's Call to "Sit in the Ambiguity" of Transportation Planning,” by Daniel Herriges
30 min
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