Brené with Tim Ferriss and Dax Shepard on Podcasting, Daily Practices, and the Long and Winding Path to Healing
Play • 1 hr 44 min

It’s a podcasters’ roundtable! In this episode, Tim Ferriss, Dax Shepard, and I talk about everything from preparing for podcasts, parenting, and ping pong, to addiction, trauma, and the long, winding road to healing and wholeness. It’s fun and hard and messy. Everything you’d expect from three people who consider curiosity a way of life.

Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
ABC News
#325: A New Way to Think About Addiction | Annie Grace
The stereotypical depiction of fighting addiction makes it seem highly unpleasant: White knuckling, sweating it out, detoxing, going cold turkey–you get the picture. This applies to classical addiction, and also to the less dangerous (but nonetheless nettlesome) unhealthy habits and compulsions that we all wrestle with. My guest today takes a very different approach. She aims to harness the pleasure centers of the brain as a way to handle addictive habits—and, controversially, she doesn’t believe you need to go cold turkey on alcohol, which is the main intoxicant she has targeted. Her name is Annie Grace, and she is the author of a very popular book called This Naked Mind. (Shout out to my friend and colleague Steve Baker, the executive producer of Nightline, who has gotten a lot out of Annie’s work, and turned me on to her.) This episode is the second in a two-part series we’re doing this week on addiction. If you missed it, go check out Monday’s episode with Buddhist teacher Kevin Griffin, who has worked to combine the dharma and the 12 steps. Speaking of the 12 steps, many people in the AA community are quite critical of Annie Grace, and she will address that in our conversation. We also cover: Her personal story, and why she now drinks as much alcohol as she wants to–which is none at all; the connection between her approach and Evelyn Tribole’s “intuitive eating”; and her thoughts on working with other addictions, including nicotine, gambling, shopping, pornography, and video games. Also: We would appreciate it if you could take a few minutes to help us out by answering a new survey about your experience with this podcast. We want to hear about your experience with our show, because we care deeply, and we are always looking for ways to improve. Please go to https://www.tenpercent.com/survey. Thank you! Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/annie-grace-325
1 hr 6 min
Happier with Gretchen Rubin
Happier with Gretchen Rubin
Gretchen Rubin / The Onward Project
Ep. 314: Re-Engage with Your Resolutions, A Hack for Helping People to Give Gifts, an Outdoors Demerit, and Why Humor Is Such a Powerful Tool at Work and in Life.
We talk about the 21 strategies that can help us re-engage with our resolutions, discuss a hack about helping people to give gifts (to avoid disappointment), and talk to Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonus about how humor can help us to engage more productively with other people. Get in touch: @gretchenrubin; @elizabethcraft; podcast@gretchenrubin.com Get in touch on Instagram: @GretchenRubin & @LizCraft Get the podcast show notes by email every week here: http://gretchenrubin.com/#newsletter Get the resources and all links related to this episode here: http://happiercast.com/314 Order a copy of Gretchen’s new book OUTER ORDER, INNER CALM here: http://outerorderinnercalmbook.com Leave a voicemail message on: 774-277-9336 For information about advertisers and promo codes, go to happiercast.com/sponsors. Happier with Gretchen Rubin is part of ‘The Onward Project,’ a family of podcasts brought together by Gretchen Rubin—all about how to make your life better. Check out the other Onward Project podcasts—Do The Thing, Side Hustle School, Happier in Hollywood and Everything Happens with Kate Bowler. If you liked this episode, please subscribe, leave a review, and tell your friends! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
42 min
Death, Sex & Money
Death, Sex & Money
WNYC Studios
I Was Your Father, Until I Wasn't
Tony* wasn't sure what to say when the woman he'd slept with told him she was pregnant. First, he says, there was a long pause. They weren't a couple, and he didn't want to say the wrong thing. "I told her that it was her choice and if she chose to keep it, then I would be a good dad," he remembers. "I was freaking out." At the time, Tony was in his mid-20s, working as a bartender and photographer in a college town out west. Tony started paying child support for his daughter near the end of the pregnancy, went to prenatal appointments, and took parenting classes along with the baby's mother. On the day his daughter was born, Tony cut the umbilical cord. And Tony was an active father. As soon as his daughter could take a bottle, he says he started sharing custody of her, sometimes watching her three or four days a week. "We were really just good buddies," he says. "It felt good to have purpose, and it felt amazing to love something so much, in a completely new way." Money became a source of tension, though, between Tony and the baby's mother. So did the fact that as his daughter got older, she started looking less like him or her mother. Tony decided to get a paternity test when his daughter was about a year old. "I couldn't play it dumb forever," Tony says—but he also feared the results. "That's not something that you want to know, especially when you love something so much." Tony quickly learned the truth: he had a zero percent probability of being the biological father. He called the mother to tell her, and soon after that, he met Victor*, the man who is his daughter's biological father. Over beers, they talked about Tony's shock, Victor's suspicions from the sidelines, and their plan for the little girl they both considered a daughter. More than two years later, they joined me to talk about the logistics and emotions of the transition that followed, which included packing up a pickup truck with nursery furniture to move it from Tony's place to Victor's. This episode first aired in 2017. *Last names have been withheld for privacy reasons.
30 min
Terrible, Thanks For Asking
Terrible, Thanks For Asking
American Public Media
Who Cares? (Part 4): Care During COVID
Caregiving has always been hard work, and heart work. It has always been challenging, rewarding, grueling and life-giving. It has always been work worth doing, and work whose worth is challenged, or hard to quantify. And adding COVID to the mix…didn’t help. This episode is filled with stories from caregivers; people who were thrust into this role by COVID, or found the role further complicated by COVID. It is a reminder that you are not alone, even when you are bone-achingly lonely. An piece of recognition and appreciation for all of you. A few additional things: Our friends at Still Kickin have *two* upcoming caregiver workshops to help you find connection and support. Caregiver Workshop (Part 1): https://www.facebook.com/events/257634999276205 Caregiver Workshop (Part 2): https://www.facebook.com/events/702119987143649 AND ALSO! We’re starting a thing for everyone who loves READING! Go here: TTFA.org/readingclub Our twice-monthly newsletter features behind-the-scenes content, previews of upcoming episodes and more. Sign up. When you shop our Bookshop.org store, you support the author, independent bookstores AND our show! Shop here. Shop for your favorite TTFA gear at TTFAmerch.com Read the transcript for this episode here. You can catch up with TTFA on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook using @ttfapodcast. Nora's Instagram is @noraborealis. TTFA is public media. Which means we are supported by you. You can join us with a contribution at ttfa.org/donate And check out our sponsors this week: Fordham University GSS: fordham.edu/gss Purple.com: purple.com/thanks10 with code thanks10 Thirdlove: thirdlove.com/terrible Calm: calm.com/thanks Ritual: ritual.com/thanks
43 min
You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton
You and Me Both with Hillary Clinton
iHeartRadio
Disinformation (with Tristan Harris and Maria Ressa)
Over the last several years, we’ve learned the hard way that disinformation, when combined with the power and reach of social media, can radicalize, divide, and destabilize communities -- and even entire countries. In this episode, Hillary talks with social media and technology expert Tristan Harris about how we got here, and what we need to do to mitigate the influence of Big Tech on our democracy. She also speaks with award-winning Filipino-American journalist Maria Ressa about why the Philippines’ shift away from democracy and toward authoritarianism should serve as a warning to us all. Tristan Harris spent three years as a Google Design Ethicist developing a framework for how technology should “ethically” steer the thoughts and actions of billions of people from screens. A featured subject in the Netflix documentary, The Social Dilemma, Tristan is now co-founder & president of the Center for Humane Technology, whose mission is to reverse “human downgrading” and re-align technology with humanity. He co-hosts the Center for Humane Technology's Your Undivided Attention podcast with co-founder Aza Raskin. For her courage and work on disinformation and “fake news,” Maria Ressa was named TIME Magazine’s 2018 Person of the Year, and has also been named one of TIME’s Most Influential Women of the Century. A journalist in Asia for nearly 35 years, Maria co-founded Rappler, the top digital-only news site in the Philippines. Maria has endured constant political harassment and arrests by the Duterte government, forced to post bail eight times to stay free. In June of 2020, Maria was found guilty of Cyber Libel charges which includes a sentence of up to six years in prison. Maria is profiled in Frontline’s A Thousand Cuts, directed by Ramona Diaz, and now streaming online on pbs.org/frontline and YouTube. The film is also available to stream in the PBS Video App and on PBS Documentaries Prime Video Channel. Full transcript here.
53 min
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