Brené with Tim Ferriss and Dax Shepard on Podcasting, Daily Practices, and the Long and Winding Path to Healing
Play • 1 hr 44 min

It’s a podcasters’ roundtable! In this episode, Tim Ferriss, Dax Shepard, and I talk about everything from preparing for podcasts, parenting, and ping pong, to addiction, trauma, and the long, winding road to healing and wholeness. It’s fun and hard and messy. Everything you’d expect from three people who consider curiosity a way of life.

Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
Ten Percent Happier with Dan Harris
ABC News
#326: How to Make a Masterpiece | Pete Docter
We’re all creatives, whether we think of ourselves that way or not. In so many aspects of your life, from planning your future to planning a meal to curating your social media, you need to be able to both envision and then execute. And how you work with your mind in these moments is key. Today, we are going to hear from a master creator -- the mind behind brilliant Pixar movies such as Inside Out, Up, and the recently-released Soul -- about how to run a creative process at the highest possible level. (I have a six-year-old, and, in my opinion, one of the worst parts of the job of being a dad is sitting through insipid children's entertainment. But the aforementioned films have been both thrilling and moving to consume, for both me and my son.) My guest today is Pete Docter, who directed all three of those films. He is the Chief Creative Officer of Pixar. He is also a meditator and a practicing Christian whose films are each motivated by a big, pressing question he is posing to himself about his own life. In this conversation, he takes us inside the making of his films, most notably Soul, for which he and his team had to invent a coherent metaphysical scheme to explain both the afterlife -- and the before. We also talk about how his spiritual practices support his storytelling endeavors, and how to power through the pain, frustration, and embarrassment of trying to make something truly original. One more thing: We would appreciate it if you could take a few minutes to help us out by answering a survey about your experience with this podcast. Our team here cares deeply about you, our listeners, and we are always looking for ways to improve. Please go to https://www.tenpercent.com/survey. And thank you. Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/pete-docter-326
51 min
Death, Sex & Money
Death, Sex & Money
WNYC Studios
I Was Your Father, Until I Wasn't
Tony* wasn't sure what to say when the woman he'd slept with told him she was pregnant. First, he says, there was a long pause. They weren't a couple, and he didn't want to say the wrong thing. "I told her that it was her choice and if she chose to keep it, then I would be a good dad," he remembers. "I was freaking out." At the time, Tony was in his mid-20s, working as a bartender and photographer in a college town out west. Tony started paying child support for his daughter near the end of the pregnancy, went to prenatal appointments, and took parenting classes along with the baby's mother. On the day his daughter was born, Tony cut the umbilical cord. And Tony was an active father. As soon as his daughter could take a bottle, he says he started sharing custody of her, sometimes watching her three or four days a week. "We were really just good buddies," he says. "It felt good to have purpose, and it felt amazing to love something so much, in a completely new way." Money became a source of tension, though, between Tony and the baby's mother. So did the fact that as his daughter got older, she started looking less like him or her mother. Tony decided to get a paternity test when his daughter was about a year old. "I couldn't play it dumb forever," Tony says—but he also feared the results. "That's not something that you want to know, especially when you love something so much." Tony quickly learned the truth: he had a zero percent probability of being the biological father. He called the mother to tell her, and soon after that, he met Victor*, the man who is his daughter's biological father. Over beers, they talked about Tony's shock, Victor's suspicions from the sidelines, and their plan for the little girl they both considered a daughter. More than two years later, they joined me to talk about the logistics and emotions of the transition that followed, which included packing up a pickup truck with nursery furniture to move it from Tony's place to Victor's. This episode first aired in 2017. *Last names have been withheld for privacy reasons.
30 min
Terrible, Thanks For Asking
Terrible, Thanks For Asking
American Public Media
Who Cares? (Part 4): Care During COVID
Caregiving has always been hard work, and heart work. It has always been challenging, rewarding, grueling and life-giving. It has always been work worth doing, and work whose worth is challenged, or hard to quantify. And adding COVID to the mix…didn’t help. This episode is filled with stories from caregivers; people who were thrust into this role by COVID, or found the role further complicated by COVID. It is a reminder that you are not alone, even when you are bone-achingly lonely. An piece of recognition and appreciation for all of you. A few additional things: Our friends at Still Kickin have *two* upcoming caregiver workshops to help you find connection and support. Caregiver Workshop (Part 1): https://www.facebook.com/events/257634999276205 Caregiver Workshop (Part 2): https://www.facebook.com/events/702119987143649 AND ALSO! We’re starting a thing for everyone who loves READING! Go here: TTFA.org/readingclub Our twice-monthly newsletter features behind-the-scenes content, previews of upcoming episodes and more. Sign up. When you shop our Bookshop.org store, you support the author, independent bookstores AND our show! Shop here. Shop for your favorite TTFA gear at TTFAmerch.com Read the transcript for this episode here. You can catch up with TTFA on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook using @ttfapodcast. Nora's Instagram is @noraborealis. TTFA is public media. Which means we are supported by you. You can join us with a contribution at ttfa.org/donate And check out our sponsors this week: Fordham University GSS: fordham.edu/gss Purple.com: purple.com/thanks10 with code thanks10 Thirdlove: thirdlove.com/terrible Calm: calm.com/thanks Ritual: ritual.com/thanks
43 min
Good Life Project
Good Life Project
Jonathan Fields / Wondery
Roy Kinsey | The Rapbrarian
My guest today, Chicago-born and raised, Roy Kinsey, is a bit of an anomaly. A black, queer-identified, rapper, and librarian or as he puts it, Rapbrarian. Roy’s escape from trauma and creative outlet as a kid was writing and music and also a love of books and learning. He began sharing his words and beats, rapping at a young age, but really began to elevate his pursuit of music-making in college, performing and refining his craft. Graduating, he began making a name for himself, performing, recording and releasing albums, while simultaneously earning degrees that would find him working as a librarian by day and an artist by night. A few albums in, Roy began to feel like an essential part of him was being kept from his music and also his community, so he made the decision to come out as queer on an album at a time very few others in the space of rap and hip-hop were out. It was a moment that would transform him and his music. Roy has since released a series of powerful albums, including his latest powerful reflection, KINSEY: A Memoir (http://www.roykinsey.com/shop). He’s been featured on the cover of major local publications like Chicago Reader and the Chicago Tribune, in and on major national, and international publications like Billboard, LA Times, NPR, WBEZ’s Vocalo. And Roy has even found a way to bring his love of music and books together, running workshops as a librarian in the Teen Services/Youmedia department for Chicago Public Libraries. You can find Roy Kinsey at: Website : http://www.roykinsey.com/ Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/roy_kinsey/ Check out our offerings & partners:  Backcountry: The best outdoor gear online for people who love to get outside. Find everything you need for your next adventure. Go to Backcountry.com/GOODLIFE and enter promo code GOODLIFE to get %15 OFF your first full-priced purchase. Some exclusions apply. Organifi: Made with whole food, organic ingredients and less than 3g of sugar, Organifi superfood blends match convenience with taste. Go to organifi.com and use code GOODLIFE for 15% off any item in the store. Nutrafol: Improve hair growth with added sleep and stress benefits. Go to Nutrafol.com and use promo code GLP to get 20% off. Plus FREE shipping on every order.
1 hr 1 min
The Integrated Schools Podcast
The Integrated Schools Podcast
Courtney Mykytyn, Andrew Lefkowits
EPIC's "Nothing About Us": Youth Theater on Integration
The Epic NEXT Program tasks 15-20 high school students with researching, writing, and performing a play about a social issue, usually related to educational justice. The idea, is that those most impacted by the system, are those most likely to come up with meaningful solutions, and that theater can be used as tool for social change. Back in 2018, New York Appleseed, an advocacy organization fighting for integrated schools and communities, commissioned EPIC to create a show about school segregation. The result was _Nothing About Us_, a 30 minute stage play written and performed by high school students. The process begins with interviews of roughly 40 people about the topic. Ranging from researchers, to parents, to administrators, the goal is to hear from a wide range of stake holders. Those interviews are then transcribed and pieced together, along with some original writing, to create the show. Students recite the words spoken in the interviews, sing and rap, and create scenes from the stories told by the interviewees. The final show, featuring 5 students, with one prop and a handful of folding chairs can then be performed just about anywhere to a wide variety of audiences. We're incredibly fortunate to be able to share some clips from a film adaptation of that show today, as well as a conversation with one of the artistic directors of EPIC and two of the students who wrote and performed the piece. If you have ever doubted the importance of youth voice, this show declares, unequivocally, that nothing about students done without their input, will be for them. Don't forget to register for the Fifty State Conversation. Once registered, you'll receive links to free screenings of Nothing About Us on: * Wednesday February 17 at 8pm (Eastern Standard Time) * Wednesday March 17 at 7pm (Eastern Standard Time) * Saturday April 17 at 3pm (Eastern Standard Time) * Monday May 17 at 7:15pm (Eastern Standard Time) If you can't make one of those, you can rent it on demand. LINKS: * EPIC Theatre Ensemble * The Fifty State Conversation - Sign up today! * Intetgrated Schools Advisory Board * Matt Gonzales * Matt Gonzales's White Lips to White Ears * IntegrateNYC's 5Rs of Real Integration * The Promise from Nashville Public Radio Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further. Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us - @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchoolson Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org. The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits. This episode was produced, edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits. Music by Kevin Casey.
1 hr 6 min
On Being with Krista Tippett
On Being with Krista Tippett
On Being Studios
The Question “Who Am I,” and Movies We Love
So many of us have been getting through this year by watching movies at home by ourselves, or with friends on Zoom, inventing new ways to grieve and to hope, to keep ourselves laughing, all through the simple act of watching stories unfold on our screens. Movies have the power to unearth the many layers of our identities; to help us answer the question: Who am I? And that is what we trace, by way of a few beloved movies including _The Color Purple_, _The Fly_, and _Blockers_, in this episode. Danez Smith — is a Black, queer, HIV-positive writer and performer from St. Paul, Minnesota. They are the author of _Homie_ and _Don’t Call Us Dead_, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Tony Banout — is the Senior Vice President of Interfaith Youth Core. He holds a PhD from the University of Chicago, where he studied at the Divinity School and was a Martin Marty Center and Provost fellow. Shea Serrano — is an author, journalist, and former teacher whose work has been featured in The Ringer and Grantland. He’s the author of _The Rap Year Book_, _Basketball (and Other Things),_ and _Movies (and Other Things)_. Emily VanDerWerff — is a writer and the Critic at Large for Vox. Virgie Tovar — is an author, activist, and one of the nation's leading experts and lecturers on weight-based discrimination and body image. She is the author of _You Have the Right to Remain Fat _and _The Self-Love Revolution_, and hosts the podcast Rebel Eaters Club. Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.
51 min
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