This Land
This Land
Jul 15, 2019
7. Still Bleeding
Play episode · 35 min

Tribes are asking that the Supreme Court keep the promises that it made to them, because what's lost when those promises are broken is much more than just land.

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Ben Franklin's World
Ben Franklin's World
Liz Covart
286 Elections in Early America: Native Sovereignty
Who is American democracy for and who could participate in early American democracy? Women and African Americans were often barred from voting in colonial and early republic elections. But what about Native Americans? Could Native Americans participate in early American democracy? Julie Reed, an Assistant Professor of History at the Pennsylvania State University, and Kathleen DuVal, the Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, join us to investigate how the sovereignty of native nations fits within the sovereignty of the United States and its democracy. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/286 Join Ben Franklin's World! * _Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears!_ Sponsor Links * _Omohundro Institute_ * OI Reader * Election Series Bibliography * October 28, 2020 at 8pm eastern: Join Holly, Joe, and Liz LIVE in the Ben Franklin’s World Listener Community Complementary Episodes * Episode 037: Kathleen DuVal, Independence Lost * Episode 158: The Revolutionaries’ Army * Episode 162: Dunmore’s New World * Episode 163: The American Revolution in North America * Episode 223: Susan Sleeper-Smith, A Native American History of the Ohio River Valley & Great Lakes Region Listen! * _Apple Podcasts_ * _Spotify_ * _Google Podcasts_ * _Ben Franklin's World iOS App_ * _Ben Franklin's World Android App_ Helpful Links * _Join the Ben Franklin's World F__acebook Group_ * Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast * _Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page_ * _Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter_
57 min
For The Wild
For The Wild
For The Wild
VANESSA CAVANAGH, RACHAEL CAVANAGH, & DEB SWAN on Ancestral Fire Regimes /205
It’s been almost a year since the 2019 wildfires that hurled across Australia began. We vividly recall harrowing images of burnt orange skies, vast swaths of scorched forest, and our beloved kin searching for shelter amidst one of the most intense wildfires. It’s estimated that nearly 30 million acres caught fire, over 20% of Australia’s forests were burnt, and around one billion animals perished. In this episode, we revisit this event with Vanessa Cavanagh, Deb Swan, and Rachael Cavanagh while also digging deeper to explore the historical land mismanagement that intensified these brushfires and the power and importance of cultural burning. Vanessa Cavanagh is an Aboriginal woman with Bundjalung and Wonnarua ancestry. Vanessa is a Ph.D. candidate and Associate Lecturer at the University of Wollongong, Australia. Deborah Kim Swan is a Ngarrindjeri mimini, with kinship affiliation to Darkinjung and Awaba Country. Deborah currently works for Transport New South Wales as a Culture & Heritage Officer. Rachael Cavanagh is a Minjungbal woman from the Bundjalung/Yugambeh Nations of South East Queensland and Northern New South Wales. Rachael currently works as an Aboriginal Partnerships Liaison for Forestry Corporation of New South Wales and is the Principle Cultural Heritage Advisor for Currie Country Foundation. Music by Santiago Cordoba and Kaivalya. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.
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