What the Chaos in Hospitals Is Doing to Doctors - Jordan Kisner - Jan/Feb 2021
Play • 48 min

Politicians’ refusal to admit when hospitals are overwhelmed puts a terrible burden on health-care providers.

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The Harper’s Podcast
The Harper’s Podcast
Harper’s Magazine
Complexity
Mike Pence is a pedophile who has been replaced by a clone. But Mike Pence also had the power to reject Electoral College votes and overturn the 2020 presidential election results. In April 2020, the U.S. military liberated 35,000 sexually abused children from hidden tunnels beneath Central Park. There’s a video of Huma Abedin and Hillary Clinton ritually killing a child for its adrenochrome. The pandemic isn’t real, and Bill Gates has created a vaccine that will change your DNA and control your mind. This is just a sample of QAnon supporters’ many beliefs, some of which openly contradict each other. As Hari Kunzru observes in the January issue of Harper’s Magazine, QAnon is less concerned with finding the root cause of society’s purported ills than it is with laying out, in ever more intricate terms and with ever more involved symbols, how entrenched those ills are. If the guesswork and speculation surrounding the Kennedy assassination provides a benchmark of popular American suspicion, then Q has “the feel of something new, a blob of unreason against which the Kennedy narrative seems quaint, almost genteel,” Kunzru writes. Various preconditions figure into the rise of Q at this historical moment—the aesthetics of contemporary political theater, the accelerant nature of the internet—but beneath them all is a human yearning for simplicity, for an incomprehensible world to make sense according to our preferred terms. In this episode, Violet Lucca talks with Kunzru, a novelist and Harper’s new Easy Chair columnist, about the antecedents and present-day mechanics of QAnon. They discuss the myths of its origins, its fraught internal logic, and its “impoverished understanding of how power actually works.” Read Kunzru’s column here: https://harpers.org/archive/2021/01/complexity-qanon-conspiracy-theories/ This episode was produced by Violet Lucca and Andrew Blevins
56 min
Make No Law: The First Amendment Podcast
Make No Law: The First Amendment Podcast
Legal Talk Network
Imminent Lawless Action
In 1919, The US Supreme Court in Schenck v. United States established the rule that if words create a "clear and present danger" to incite criminal activity or violence, the government has the right to prevent and punish that speech. For nearly fifty years, through wars and the Red Scare, that rule was applied largely without question. Then, in the 1969 case of Brandenburg v. Ohio, a white supremacist in Ohio, convicted for an inflammatory speech at a Klan rally, challenged his conviction saying it violated his First Amendment rights...and the Court agreed. A new test was born which has lasted for now more than 50 years. But, having been formulated in an era of much more limited media, does it still hold up today? In this episode of Make No Law: The First Amendment Podcast from Popehat.com, host Ken White explores how the First Amendment has handled inflammatory speech, from Schenck to the current Brandenburg standard and all the way up to today. With the help of Professors David Cunningham and Richard Wilson, Ken digs into what makes the “imminent lawless action” test of Brandenburg such an important turning point in First Amendment law but also investigates whether the proliferation of online communication necessitates a renewed look at the standards set out in a “simpler” time. Professor David Cunningham is professor and Chair of Sociology at Washington University in St. Louis. Professor Richard Wilson is the Gladstein Distinguished Chair of Human Rights and Professor of Law and Anthropology at UConn School of Law.
34 min
Longform
Longform
Longform
Episode 430: Connie Walker
Connie Walker is an investigative reporter and podcast host. Her new show is Stolen: The Search for Jermain.“For so long, there has been this kind of history of journalists coming in and taking stories from Indigenous communities. And that kind of extractive, transactional kind of journalism that really causes a lot of harm. And so much of our work is trying to undo and address that. There is a way to be a storyteller and help amplify and give people agency in their stories.” Thanks to Mailchimp for sponsoring this week's episode. Show notes: @connie_walker Walker's CBC News archive 00:00 Missing & Murdered (CBC News) 04:00 "The Injustice to Pamela George Continues Long After Her Murder" (Heather Mallick • Toronto Star • Jan 2020) 08:00 Street Cents (CBC) 12:00 "Alicia Ross: Everyone’s Daughter" (Catherine McDonald • Global News • Apr 2020) 14:00 Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada 19:00 8th Fire, Ep. 1: "Indigenous in the City" (CBC • 2012) 19:00 8th Fire, Ep. 2: "It’s Time" (CBC • 2012) 19:00 8th Fire, Ep. 3: "Whose Land Is It Anyway?" (CBC • 2012) 19:00 8th Fire, Ep. 4: "At the Crossroads" (CBC • 2012) 22:00 "Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women: A National Operational Overview" (Royal Canadian Mounted Police • 2014) 24:00 "Missing and Murdered: The Life and Mysterious Death of Leah Anderson" (CBC News • Mar 2015) 26:00 Serial 27:00 "Amber Tuccaro's Unsolved Murder: Do You Recognize This Voice?" (Marnie Luke and Connie Walker • CBC News • Jun 2015) 27:00 "Unresolved: Patricia Carpenter" (Holly Moore • CBC News • Jun 2016) 27:00 Missing & Murdered Season 1: Who Killed Alberta Williams? (Connie Walker and Marnie Luke • CBC News) 27:00 Missing & Murdered Season 2: Finding Cleo (Connie Walker and Marnie Luke • CBC News) 35:00 Ochberg Fellowship 37:00 "Duncan McCue on Reporting in Indigenous Communities" (Ryerson Today • Apr 2018) 37:00 Reporting in Indigenous Communities Guide (Duncan McCue) 39:00 Stolen (Gimlet • 2021) 39:00 "Jermain Charlo Missing Two Years on Tuesday" (Seaborn Larson • Missoulian • Jun 2020) 44:00 "Monday's Montanan: Lauren Small Rodriguez Helps Native Trafficking Survivors " (Patrick Reilly • Missoulian • Feb 2020)   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
50 min
New Books in History
New Books in History
Marshall Poe
Robert Darnton, "Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment" (Oxford UP, 2021)
In the late-18th century, a group of publishers in what historian Robert Darnton calls the "Fertile Crescent" — countries located along the French border, stretching from Holland to Switzerland — pirated the works of prominent (and often banned) French writers and distributed them in France, where laws governing piracy were in flux and any notion of "copyright" very much in its infancy. Piracy was entirely legal and everyone acknowledged — tacitly or openly — that these pirated editions of works by Rousseau, Voltaire, and Diderot, among other luminaries, supplied a growing readership within France, one whose needs could not be met by the monopolistic and tightly controlled Paris Guild. Darnton's book Pirating and Publishing: The Book Trade in the Age of Enlightenment (Oxford UP, 2021) focuses principally on a publisher in Switzerland, one of the largest and whose archives are the most complete. Through the lens of this concern, he offers a sweeping view of the world of writing, publishing, and especially bookselling in pre-Revolutionary France--a vibrantly detailed inside look at a cut-throat industry that was struggling to keep up with the times and, if possible, make a profit off them. Featuring a fascinating cast of characters — lofty idealists and down-and-dirty opportunists — this new book expands upon on Darnton's celebrated work on book-publishing in France, most recently found in Literary Tour de France. Pirating and Publishing reveals how and why piracy brought the Enlightenment to every corner of France, feeding the ideas that would explode into revolution. Zach McCulley (@zamccull) is a historian of religion and literary cultures in early modern England and PhD candidate in History at Queen's University Belfast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
51 min
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