Revisionist History Presents: Deep Cover
Play • 44 min

Revisionist History Presents: Deep Cover, the true story of an FBI agent in Detroit who goes undercover in an outlaw motorcycle gang and makes a series of bizarre discoveries that inadvertently lead to the US invasion of a foreign country.

In the first episode, Detroit FBI agent Ned Timmons busts Toby Anderson, a violent criminal who also fancies himself a budding country music star. Ned flips Toby and goes undercover as a biker, but Toby quickly goes out of control. He uses the newfound protection of the FBI to commit robberies and perhaps far worse. Most agents would give up, and send Toby to jail, but Ned has a feeling Toby might be his key to the criminal underworld.


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How to Save a Planet
How to Save a Planet
Gimlet
Kelp Farming, for the Climate (Part II)
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44 min
Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Texas Storm, NASA Climate Advisor, Mars Sounds. Feb 26, 2021, Part 1
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47 min
On the Media
On the Media
WNYC Studios
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50 min
99% Invisible
99% Invisible
Roman Mars
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33 min
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