Radio Headspace
Radio Headspace
Jul 21, 2020
Are You Bored?
5 min

“Boredom” has become something negative. We see it as a condition of our lives that we must change. We search for stimulation and distraction, but by doing that, we are essentially saying that this moment is not enough. The next time you feel bored, pause and examine it. You may find that you’re never bored again.

This week, Radio Headspace is sponsored by The Michelle Obama Podcast. Listen free at Spotify.com/MichelleObama

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Daily Meditation Podcast
Daily Meditation Podcast
Mary Meckley
Putting Closure on Your Day to Sleep Better
"I noticed that whenever I meditate before sleeping, I sleep easily and wake up refreshed." ~ Fellow Meditator, Saba from Tehran, Iran This week, I invite you to follow along with the wisdom from Paramhansa Yogananda who wrote the classic, "Autobiography of a Yogi." In this week's series, we'll be exploring another book he wrote called, "Awaken Your True Potential." You'll explore a different meditation technique in each episode to focus on positivity and to release negative thoughts. This is part 5 of a 7-part Awaken Your Full Potential meditation series, episodes 2166-2172. THIS WEEK'S CHALLENGE: You're invited to take part in a Positivity Quest. Every day this week, notice negative thoughts and switch them around to focus on positivity. THIS WEEK'S MEDITATION TECHNIQUES: Day 1: Reverse Negative Thoughts Visualization Day 2: Affirmation "I am grateful for all I am." Day 3: Inhale + expand the abdomen, Exhale + allow it to sink downward Day 4: Vayu Mudra technique Day 5: Fourth Chakra Focus Day 6: Layer the week's techniques together Day 7: Weekly Reflection Meditation LET'S SUPPORT EACH OTHER - WANT TO SHARE YOUR MEDITATION RITUAL WITH YOUR FELLOW MEDITATORS? Let's connect and inspire each other! Please share a little about how meditation has helped you by reaching out to me at Mary@SipandOm.com or direct message me on https://www.instagram.com/sip.and.om. We'd love to hear about your meditation ritual! SUBSCRIBE, LEAVE A REVIEW + TAKE OUR SURVEY SUBSCRIBE so you don't miss a single episode. Consistency is the KEY to a successful meditation ritual. SHARE the podcast with someone who could use a little extra support. I'd be honored if you left me a podcast review. If you do, please email me at Mary@sipandom.com and let me know a little about yourself and how meditation has helped you. I'd love to share your journey to inspire fellow meditators on the podcast! SURVEY: Help us get to know more about how best to serve you by taking our demographics survey: https://survey.libsyn.com/thedailymeditationpodcast FOR DAILY EXTRA SUPPORT OUTSIDE THE PODCAST Each day's meditation techniques shared at: * sip.and.om Instagram https://www.instagram.com/sip.and.om/ * sip and om Facebook * https://www.facebook.com/SipandOm/ JOIN OUR FREE FACEBOOK GROUP Connect with other meditators on the Daily Meditation Podcast private Facebook group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/thedailymeditationpodcast/ SIP AND OM MEDITATION APP Join Mary for deeper, longer daily 30-minute guided meditations on the Sip and Om meditation app. Give it a whirl for 2-weeks free! Receive access to 2,000+ 30-minute guided meditations customized around a weekly theme to help you manage emotions. Receive a Clarity Journal and a Slow Down Guide customized for each weekly theme. 2 weeks for access to the iOS version: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sip-and-om/id1216664612?platform=iphone&preserveScrollPosition=true#platform/iphone 2 weeks free access to the Android version: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sipandom.sipandom All meditations are created by Mary Meckley and are her original content. Please request permission to use any of Mary's content by sending an email to Mary@sipandom.com. Resources: Music by Christopher Lloyd Clarke and Greg Keller.
12 min
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy
David Burns, MD
217: Ask David: Is human "worthwhileness" worthwhile? Why am I always the the last to find out about anything? A Daily Gratitude Log, Positive Reframing and more!
Today's Ask David features four terrific questions. * Kevin asks: Why is the concept of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? * Vallejo asks: Does the statement, "WHY AM I ALWAYS THE LAST ONE TO FIND OUT ABOUT ANYTHING?” correspond to overgeneralization, or self-blame? I’ve been listening to the early podcasts on the ten positive and negative cognitive distortions. * David P asks: Do you think there is anything to be gained from a daily gratitude log, to go along with the daily mood log? * Harvey asks: I don’t see how Positive Reframing actually contributes to the therapy. * Kevin asks: Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Hi David, I have a quick question about the concept of being a worthwhile human being. Suppose a person believes they are unconditionally worthwhile, what are the implications of this? Why are the concepts of worthwhileness and worthlessness so important to people and their emotional health? Best Regards, Kevin Hi Kevin, Thanks! That’s a very important question. However, it is abstract and philosophical. I have found that philosophical discussions tend to go on endlessly with resolve. In contrast, when someone asks for help with a specific moment when she or he was upset, then I can usually show that person how to change the way she or he is feeling. And when that happens, the person generally suddenly “sees” the solution to some very profound philosophical or spiritual questions. All that being said, I’ll take a crack at it. The goal of TEAM therapy is not to go from thinking that you’re a worthless human being to thinking that you’re a worthwhile human being, but to give up these concepts as nonsensical. Specific activities, talents or thoughts can be more or less worthwhile, but a human being cannot be more or less worthwhile. We can judge specific events, actions, and so forth, but not humans. At least I am not aware of how to validly judge a human being, or a group of humans. We can only judge their actions, attitudes, thoughts, and so forth. Unconditional self-esteem is definitely better than conditional self-esteem, since you don’t have to be perfect or a great achiever or a great anything to be “worthwhile,” but you are still focused on being "worthwhile." I'm not sure what that means, but there is a downside, to my way of thinking. If you think you are worthwhile because you are a human being, does that mean that you are more worthwhile than animals? Lots of people abuse animals, hunt animals, and so forth, which many people find immensely disturbing. These are some of the consequences of thinking that animals are less worthwhile, for example. Not sure that helps, but like your line of questioning! David Kevin follows up: What is the implication then of giving up these concepts at all? I assume that thinking that you have unconditional worthwhileness because you are alive or to drop these concepts entirely have the same emotional implications for people. What are these implications? For example, if I think that worthwhileness and worthlessness are meaningless concepts, so what? What’s the point? What do I gain? Hi Kevin, Let me start by saying, once again, that I am not an evangelist spreading the “gospel,” so to speak. My goal is simply to help people who are struggling with feelings of depression, anxiety, and self-doubt. So, if your way of thinking about things is working for you, there’s no reason to change. But my focus is always on someone who is suffering, and that’s where these concepts can sometimes be important. I can tell you what I gained by giving up the idea that I could be, or needed to be “worthwhile” or “special.” I gained a great deal of joy. It was a lot like escaping from a mental prison. It freed me to find incredible joy in the “ordinary” events of my daily life. It also freed me from fears of “failure” or not being “good enough.” Depression always results from Overgeneralization--you generalize from failing at something specific to thinking you are a failure as a human being. Without Overgeneralization, I think it is safe to say that it is impossible to be depressed. For example, if you measure your worthwhileness based on your achievements and success, you may feel excited when you succeed and devastated or anxious when you fail, or when you are in danger of failing. I'm not sure if this addresses your excellent question! A young woman told herself that she was "unloveable" when she and her boyfriend broke up after two years of going together. Can you see that she thinks she has a "self" that can be "loveable" or "unloveable?" This thought was very disturbing to her, as you might imagine. Relationships do not break up because someone is "unloveable," but because of specific factors or events that drive people apart. Once you zero in on why the relationship failed, or more correctly, why the two of you broke up, then you can pinpoint the causes and learn and grow so you can make your next relationship even better. There are tons of specific reasons why people break up! But if you think that you’re “unloveable,” or tell yourself that the relationship was “a failure,” then you may get stuck in a morass of negative feelings. But it’s not even true that the relationship was a failure.” That’s All-or-Nothing Thinking, since all relationships are a mixture of more or less successful aspects. You could even tell yourself that a “failed” relationship was a partial success, since you successfully learned that this isn’t the person you’re going to spend the rest of your life with. What’s in it for you to give up Overgeneralization and All-or-Nothing Thinking, as well as the concepts of being a “worthwhile” or “worthless” human being? That’s a decision each person can make. There are benefits as well as problems with these ways of thinking. For example, let’s say you’re depressed and think of yourself as “defective.” This is a common negative thought, and it is based on the idea that a human being could be more or less worthwhile, or thinking that your "self" can be judged or rated. So, you could do two Cost-Benefit Analyses. * * First, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a “defective” human being. Then balance the advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale, assigning the larger number to the list that seems more important or desirable. * Second, you could list the advantages and disadvantages of thinking of yourself as a human being with defects, and once again balance the list of advantages against the disadvantages on a 100-point scale. This is just a subtle change in semantics, but the emotional implications can sometimes be pretty powerful. As I mentioned at the top, philosophical debates are just debates. Fun, perhaps, but not terribly useful. I’m more interested in magic, or miracles. That’s what happens at the moment of profound change, which can ONLY happen by focusing on one specific moment when you felt upset and needed help. When you do that, everything becomes radically different, and real change can occur. And at that magic moment of change, the solutions to all of the problems of philosophy will often suddenly become crystal clear. Or, to put it differently, the philosophical debates will suddenly become, without meaning to sound harsh, almost a waste of previous time. Our current semi-feral cat loves my wife, but is only starting to trust me, so I’ve been working at gaining her trust and learning to understand her non-verbal and somewhat complex efforts to communicate. Yesterday she roller over on her back and stretch out her front and back paws to expose her tummy to the max, and she let me pet her tummy for quite a long time, purring loudly the whole time. I don’t car…
1 hr 2 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
173. Confidence, Self-Doubt, and Overcoming Limitations with Our New Team Member, Michael Herold
In his TEDx talk, Michael Herold, public speaker, confidence coach, and podcaster extraordinaire, says, “Things you will achieve in your life, you will achieve because of your disability, not in spite of it.” In this week’s episode of Psychologists Off the Clock, Michael talks with Debbie and Yael about confidence, self-doubt, and overcoming limitations. Limitations are all around us. These might be thoughts about how unqualified we are, feelings of anxiety, or even physical disabilities such as spinal muscular atrophy, but Michael Herold has some good news. We can overcome the limitations that come from our own heads, by taking Comfort Zone Challenges! Join us in this episode to learn about how to work with those limitations, instead of against them, to achieve the life you want.  The Psychologists Off the Clock are excited to welcome Michael aboard as our new Strategic Consultant. Join us to for this episode to meet Michael and learn about our new team member!  Listen and Learn How to build confidence and step outside your comfort zone About Michael’s transition from animator to public speaker, coach, and podcaster  Why Acceptance and Commitment Therapy resonates with Michael and how it changed his life  How Michael’s disability, spinal muscular atrophy, has shaped his unique perspective  How you can use values to overcome your limitations About motivational porn and the microaggressions we often use when discussing people who have ‘overcome’ disability-related limitations Why it’s so important to connect with people and how to do that  Inside information on how Coach Michael works to build his clients’ confidence  Tips and tricks from the master himself on how to build your own confidence Resources from this Podcast Episode Michael's TEDx talk  Michael’s website Michael's podcast: The Art of Charm   The Art of Charm Podcast's Episode featuring Michael  The Art of Charm Podcast's Core Confidence Program  Viktor Frankl's Book: Man's Search for Meaning  Michael’s Short Film “When I grow up” All of Michael’s short animated films  Michael Herold   About Michael Herold Early in his life, doctors told Michael Herold’s parents that his severe disability would keep him from living a normal life. The doctors were right. Michael’s life has been anything but normal. In fact, he is quite a renaissance man. For over a decade, Michael was a successful animator for Nickelodeon and worked on a variety of shows including Penguins of Madagascar and Kung Fu Panda. He currently does public speaking around the world and has recently spoken in front of parliament and given a TEDx talk. Michael also uses skills and exercises from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to provide coaching on a variety of life-skills including public speaking, self-doubt, communication, and, primarily, confidence. Visit Michael’s website to find out more!      Episode 91. Disability as a Form of Diversity with Dr. Erin Andrews Episode 169. Microaggressions, Mental Health Disparities, and Racial Trauma with Monnica Williams Episode 102. A Liberated Mind with Dr. Steven Hayes Episode 72. Committed Action with Dr. DJ Moran Episode 32. Social Connection: Exploring Loneliness and Building Intimacy
1 hr 16 min
Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
Feel Better, Live More with Dr Rangan Chatterjee
Dr Rangan Chatterjee: GP & Author
#134 Matthew McConaughey on How To Be More You
CAUTION ADVISED: this podcast contains swearing. When I started these podcasts, back in January 2018, my aim was to connect with people who had new and exciting views on how we can feel better and get more out of life. Little did I know that would lead me to today’s episode, where I chat to one of the world’s most famous Hollywood actors. Matthew McConaughey might not immediately spring to mind as a self-help guru. Yet for his 2014 Oscar acceptance speech he memorably shared some of the tenets by which he lives his life and to which he owes his success. And Matthew now shares his wisdom in his new book, ‘Greenlights: Raucous stories and outlaw wisdom’, which has already become a bestseller all over the globe. Based on the journals he’s kept since he was a teenager, it’s part autobiography, part guide to living – and 100 per cent inspiration. I was so pleased to learn Matthew wanted to come on the podcast and was prepared to give me 90 minutes of his time, something almost unheard of in stars of his magnitude. But as you’ll hear in this episode, Matthew isn’t your typical movie star. Authenticity is very important to Matthew, as is his quest to, in his words, “Be more me.” And that starts with eliminating what is not you. In Matthew’s own life, key examples include his decision to leave law school and become an actor, and later to turn down vast sums of money to leave the rom-com genre behind. Whilst he acknowledges the financial privilege that allowed him to take these risks, his lesson is about being true to yourself and your values, which is relevant for all of us. He says we should make sure we are feeding our soul account as well as our bank account, investing spiritually as well as financially. We cover so many topics during this entertaining chat, from our favourite U2 album to the current state of society as well as the incredible value of journaling. Whilst Matthew’s approach isn’t to give advice, there’s plenty of wisdom in the colourful stories and examples from his life that he shares. The beautiful thing about living, he says, is that you’re the author of your life’s story. So be cool to your future self. That’s some pretty awesome A-list advice I think we can all benefit from. Show notes available at drchatterjee.com/134 Follow me on instagram.com/drchatterjee/ Follow me on facebook.com/DrChatterjee/ Follow me on twitter.com/drchatterjeeuk DISCLAIMER: The content in the podcast and on this webpage is not intended to constitute or be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have heard on the podcast or on my website.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
1 hr 37 min
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