Social Distance
Social Distance
Jul 22, 2020
$600 a Week
Play • 23 min

In a few days, 30 million Americans will lose the $600 in unemployment insurance they’ve depended on every week. What happens next? Annie Lowrey, staff writer and author of Give People Money, joins to explain.


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Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Commonwealth Club of California
Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at '60 Minutes'
Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show. When he joined the "60 Minutes" team in June 1980, he knew he had reached the heights of TV journalism, and while there he helped break some of the most important stories in TV news history. Behind closed doors, though, was a war room of clashing producers, anchors, and the inimitable Mike Wallace. With surprising humor, charm, and an eye for colorful detail, Rosen delivers an authoritative account of the unforgettable personalities that battled for prestige, credit and the desire to scoop everyone else in the game. As Mike Wallace’s top producer, Rosen reveals the interview secrets that made Wallace’s work legendary, and the flaring temper that made him infamous. Rosen also shares his experiences as senior producer of "ABC News Primetime Live" and of "20/20", exposing the competitive environment among colleagues like Diane Sawyer and Barbara Walters, and the power plays among correspondents like Chris Wallace, Anderson Cooper, and Chris Cuomo. Join us for a master class on how TV news is made. MLF ORGANIZER George Hammond NOTES This program contains EXPLICIT language. MLF: Humanities SPEAKERS Ira Rosen Former Producer, "60 Minutes"; Author, Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60 Minutes In Conversation with George Hammond Author, Conversations With Socrates In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on February 25th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 13 min
KQED's The California Report
KQED's The California Report
KQED
For Farmworkers Hoping to Get Vaccinated, Information is Scarce
Lawmakers Reach Deal on Reopening Schools Under the deal, schools that reopen by the end of March stand to get a cut of money earmarked by the state legislature. The deal would not mandate students and staff to get vaccinated before returning to the classroom, nor does it require districts to get approval from teachers unions before returning. California Farmworkers Now Eligible for Vaccines Governor Gavin Newsom recently announced an initiative to get more Central Valley farmworkers vaccinated for COVID-19 as part of his plan to make distribution more equitable. Farmworkers are showing interest in getting the vaccine, but it's not always clear how to do so. Reporter: Madi Bolaños, Valley Public Radio Three Fresno Janitors Win Settlement Against Nation's Largest Cleaning Company One of the plaintiffs in the case, Araceli Sanchez, says she endured 14 years of harassment, including sexual assault and attempted rape, from her supervisor while working the night shift. Reporter: Sasha Khokha, The California Report Advocates Locate Parents of 112 Migrant Children Separated From Parents Under Trump Attorneys searching for parents whose children were taken away from them at the border under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy say they have made significant progress. Reporter: Michelle Wiley, KQED New State Bill Could Severely Limit Corporate Role in Rental Market In the wake of the Great Recession, investors scooped up thousands of single-family homes across the country, including in California. A new state bill would impose limits on corporations that own 10 or more residential properties across the state. Reporter: Erin Baldassari, KQED Fresno Bee Investigation Shows Police Stop Black Drivers More Often The analysis shows Black drivers are stopped by police at twice the rate of white and Latino drivers, and were also searched and arrested more than other races. Guest: Manuela Tobias, Fresno Bee reporter
15 min
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