Social Distance
Social Distance
Apr 16, 2020
What Will the Summer Be Like?
26 min

Staff writer Ed Yong braces Jim and Katherine for a very different summer than most of us are used to.

How To Citizen with Baratunde
How To Citizen with Baratunde
iHeartRadio
To be Less Polarized, We Must Humanize (with Esther Perel)
Baratunde ends Season One focused on the state of our relationships, a key pillar of how to citizen, and thus the health of our society after the most contentious election in modern history. In conversation with world-renowned relationship expert, Esther Perel, they discuss how to repair relationships in this moment, and how choosing to listen and humanize each other is not only how to citizen, but enlightened self-interest.   Show Notes + Links We are grateful to Esther Perel for joining us! Follow her @EstherPerelOfficial on IG or @estherperel on Twitter. or find more of her work at EstherPerel.com.  We will post this episode, a transcript, show notes and more at howtocitizen.com. Please show your support for the show in the form of a review and rating. It makes a huge difference with the algorithmic overlords!  INTERNAL ACTIONS  What is your model of relationships? Were you raised to believe in self-reliance and autonomy or interdependence and loyalty? Do you conceive of yourself as an “I” trying to develop a “We” or the other way around?   Take inventory of the relationships in your life.  Identify relationships in your life that are polarized over politics. Determine which make you truly unsafe that you must let go, then focus on those where you are still committed to some level of relationship and you can still see possibility. In those relationships, make the choice to humanize the person, listen, and find common ground, no matter how small. Reflect on your own behavior and language. Can you acknowledge any responsibility for the state of the relationship?   Examine your own perspectives about people who vote differently than you.  What about your view or beliefs about “these people” makes you fearful? If these thoughts were reversed, would they sound fair or accurate to you? Can you imagine another dimension to one of them as to why they vote or behave the way they do?    EXTERNAL ACTIONS Choose to deepen one or two relationships with people who voted differently from you. Instead of ignoring how a loved one voted, practice engaging through questions, not arguments. Be curious. Remember the question from Eric Liu in Ep 2: “what are you afraid of?” and add “what do you hope for?” and “what do you care about?” Build and invest in relationships outside of politics. We need more excuses to connect with each other beyond politics. In our second episode, Eric Liu asked us to start a club, any club. Do it. If you’re already in one or more, good for you. Stay connected to others through the common interests you share. Invest in those relationships.  ------------------------------------------------------ If you take any of these actions, share that with us - action@howtocitizen.com. Mention Humanize in the subject line. And share about your citizening on social media using #howtocitizen.  SEASON BREAK NOTES Thrilled at the response. - example of quotes about the show, slack, inbox, or reviews in itunes. If you’ve enjoyed, the NUMBER ONE WAY PODCAST GROW are by word of mouth. Tell someone about the show or your favorite episode.  Thanks for riding with us this season. Here’s the news on the future of this show: There’s a future of this show! We will be making a second season and expect to release it in the first quarter of 2021.  We might drop some special episodes during this transition period for our country and our podcast, but here’s some ways to stay connected… Baratunde and show social @baratunde on socials. @howtocitizenwithbaratunde on IG 202-894-8844 “citizen” Send us email or voice memo! on what you’ve thought of season 1 and what you’d want to hear in season 2. comments@howtocitizen.com Listen back to season 1, Visit Baratunde's website to sign up for his newsletter to learn about upcoming guests, live tapings, and more. Follow him on Instagram or join his Patreon. You can even text him, like right now at 202-894-8844. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
1 hr 10 min
The Field
The Field
The New York Times
On Election Day, 'Two Different Worlds'
This episode contains strong language. At the heart of one race for the Wisconsin State Assembly are some of the same political cracks splitting the U.S. as a whole. Some believe keeping businesses running is a priority during the coronavirus pandemic; others think keeping people safe and healthy should be given precedence. Rob Swearingen is a four-time Republican assemblyman and owner of a local restaurant. He challenged the lockdown imposed by Wisconsin’s governor and, since reopening his business, has taken a loose interpretation of the mask mandate. His Democratic challenger, Kirk Bangstad, has strictly followed statewide edicts, opening his restaurant outdoors in the summer and, when there were coronavirus infections among his staff, closing down until all could be tested. What do the different approaches reveal about Wisconsin politics and about broader American divisions? Reid J. Epstein, a politics reporter for The New York Times, and Andy Mills and Luke Vander Ploeg, audio producers for The Times, went to the state to find out. Guests: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times; Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The Times; Luke Vander Ploeg, an audio producer for The Times.  Bonus Election Day special: The Daily is going LIVE today. Listen to Michael Barbaro and Carolyn Ryan, a deputy managing editor at The Times, as they call our correspondents for the latest on a history-making day.  Tune in from 4 - 8 p.m. Eastern, only on nytimes.com/thedaily and on the The New York Times iPhone app. Click here for more information.  Background reading:  * Here’s Reid’s story about how the virus has divided the conservative town of Minocqua, Wis. * President Trump and Joe Biden barnstormed through battleground states, concluding an extraordinary campaign conducted amid a health crisis and deep economic anxiety.
37 min
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