Social Distance
Social Distance
Apr 13, 2020
Where the Curve Has Flattened
23 min

What's been the difference in the parts of the country that haven't seen as bad an outbreak? Staff writer Russell Berman talks about how officials on the West Coast responded to the problem.

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How To Citizen with Baratunde
How To Citizen with Baratunde
iHeartRadio
To be Less Polarized, We Must Humanize (with Esther Perel)
Baratunde ends Season One focused on the state of our relationships, a key pillar of how to citizen, and thus the health of our society after the most contentious election in modern history. In conversation with world-renowned relationship expert, Esther Perel, they discuss how to repair relationships in this moment, and how choosing to listen and humanize each other is not only how to citizen, but enlightened self-interest.   Show Notes + Links We are grateful to Esther Perel for joining us! Follow her @EstherPerelOfficial on IG or @estherperel on Twitter. or find more of her work at EstherPerel.com.  We will post this episode, a transcript, show notes and more at howtocitizen.com. Please show your support for the show in the form of a review and rating. It makes a huge difference with the algorithmic overlords!  INTERNAL ACTIONS  What is your model of relationships? Were you raised to believe in self-reliance and autonomy or interdependence and loyalty? Do you conceive of yourself as an “I” trying to develop a “We” or the other way around?   Take inventory of the relationships in your life.  Identify relationships in your life that are polarized over politics. Determine which make you truly unsafe that you must let go, then focus on those where you are still committed to some level of relationship and you can still see possibility. In those relationships, make the choice to humanize the person, listen, and find common ground, no matter how small. Reflect on your own behavior and language. Can you acknowledge any responsibility for the state of the relationship?   Examine your own perspectives about people who vote differently than you.  What about your view or beliefs about “these people” makes you fearful? If these thoughts were reversed, would they sound fair or accurate to you? Can you imagine another dimension to one of them as to why they vote or behave the way they do?    EXTERNAL ACTIONS Choose to deepen one or two relationships with people who voted differently from you. Instead of ignoring how a loved one voted, practice engaging through questions, not arguments. Be curious. Remember the question from Eric Liu in Ep 2: “what are you afraid of?” and add “what do you hope for?” and “what do you care about?” Build and invest in relationships outside of politics. We need more excuses to connect with each other beyond politics. In our second episode, Eric Liu asked us to start a club, any club. Do it. If you’re already in one or more, good for you. Stay connected to others through the common interests you share. Invest in those relationships.  ------------------------------------------------------ If you take any of these actions, share that with us - action@howtocitizen.com. Mention Humanize in the subject line. And share about your citizening on social media using #howtocitizen.  SEASON BREAK NOTES Thrilled at the response. - example of quotes about the show, slack, inbox, or reviews in itunes. If you’ve enjoyed, the NUMBER ONE WAY PODCAST GROW are by word of mouth. Tell someone about the show or your favorite episode.  Thanks for riding with us this season. Here’s the news on the future of this show: There’s a future of this show! We will be making a second season and expect to release it in the first quarter of 2021.  We might drop some special episodes during this transition period for our country and our podcast, but here’s some ways to stay connected… Baratunde and show social @baratunde on socials. @howtocitizenwithbaratunde on IG 202-894-8844 “citizen” Send us email or voice memo! on what you’ve thought of season 1 and what you’d want to hear in season 2. comments@howtocitizen.com Listen back to season 1, Visit Baratunde's website to sign up for his newsletter to learn about upcoming guests, live tapings, and more. Follow him on Instagram or join his Patreon. You can even text him, like right now at 202-894-8844. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
1 hr 10 min
The Takeaway
The Takeaway
WNYC and PRX
Politics with Amy Walter: How the Media is Preparing to Cover the Biden Administration
President Donald Trump spent his first term undermining the credibility of the media. His tweets, campaign events, and press conferences were tools he used to cast doubt on the legitimacy of reputable news organizations while promoting unfounded lies and conspiracy theories that served his personal agenda. As President Trump prepares to leave office, members of the White House press pool have turned their gaze to President-elect Joe Biden. Due to the virtual nature of campaigning in 2020, Biden was able to avoid much of the traditional back and forth with members of the media. There are some who argue that members of the press didn’t push hard enough to get Biden in front of reporters. But because Biden has spent a considerable amount of time in Washington, he has a track record that he can be measured against. A core part of Biden’s campaign promise was a return to normalcy that would include a more traditional communications team and relationship with the press. Rick Klein, political director at ABC News, Caitlin Conant, political director at CBS News, and Ben Smith, media columnist at The New York Times discuss what the Biden administration’s relationship with the press could look like. Congressman-elect Ritchie Torres (D-NY) is a freshman member of the 117th Congress representing New York's 15th Congressional District. With the balance of the senate up for grabs come January, Congressman-elect Torres describes his expectations for his first months on the job. You can hear extended conversations with the newest members of Congress here. In January, Georgia will hold two runoff elections that will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate. To secure the majority, Democrats will need to win both seats. Gradual demographic change, particularly in metro areas like Savannah and Atlanta, have pushed this former Republican stronghold into the swing-state territory. At the same time, grassroots organizations, many of them led by Black women, have spent years organizing and registering voters - especially Black voters. Among those organizers is Deborah Scott, executive director of Georgia Stand-Up. Her organization is working overtime to register voters ahead of the December 7th registration deadline in addition to making sure voters that participated in the presidential race vote in the runoff. In assessing how this once Republican stronghold has become a swing state, most of the attention has been on the influence of the state’s Black voters and white suburban voters. This makes sense given their share of the population. However, the fastest-growing group of voters in the state are Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. While they make up a significantly smaller share of the vote, their political influence can be seen at the congressional and statewide levels. An early analysis of the November elections by a Democratic firm found that voter participation by Asian American and Pacific Islanders in Georgia was up by 91 percent from 2016. Amy B Wang, a national politics reporter for The Washington Post, described the role Asian American and Pacific Islander voters played in 2020 and the role they might play during January’s special election.
50 min
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