How Pete Holmes Turned His Life Into Comedy With ‘Crashing’ | Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air (Ep. 57)
Play • 1 hr 20 min
Larry Wilmore sits down with comedian Pete Holmes to talk about reactions to Louis C.K. doing stand up again (24:18), growing up in an evangelical church (29:55), and his inspirations for his TV show ‘Crashing’ (53:39).
Host: Larry Wilmore
Guest: Pete Holmes
Majority 54
Majority 54
Wonder Media Network
Ted Cruz's Human Suit
Today's episode features roasting Ted Cruz, exposing Facebook's bias, and breaking down cult psychology with a leading expert in the field. Athletic Greens makes investing in your energy, immunity and gut health each day simple, tasty and efficient. Simply visit AthleticGreens.com/MAJORITY and join health experts, athletes and health conscious go-getters around the world who make a daily commitment to their health every day. Stop handing over your personal data to ISPs and other tech giants who mine your activity and sell off your information. ExpressVPN as the best way to keep your online activity secure. Visit ExpressVPN.com/Majority54 to get three extra months free. Today's show is brought to you by BetterHelp. Join over one million people taking charge of their mental health and get 10% off your first month when you go to BetterHelp.com/M54. Bombas makes the most comfortable socks in the history of feet. Even better than that, for every pair of socks you purchase, Bombas donates a pair to someone in need. The generosity of Bombas customers has allowed them to donate over 40 million pairs of socks and counting. Get 20% off your first purchase at Bombas.com/Majority54 Jason is back with a new season and a new co-host, Ravi Gupta. Each week, they'll tackle our most pressing issues, giving you the tools necessary to successfully have conversations across the aisle. Majority54 is a Wonder Media Network production. It's produced by Grace Lynch and Edie Allard. Theme music provided by Kemet Coleman. Special thanks to Diana Kander. We want to hear from you! Email us at M54@wondermedianetwork.com or leave us a voicemail by calling 508-687-2589 and you could have your voice on the show. Majority 54 on Twitter Jason on Twitter Jason on Instagram Ravi on Twitter Ravi on Instagram Dr. Steven Hassan's website
50 min
Hell & High Water with John Heilemann
Hell & High Water with John Heilemann
The Recount & iHeartRadio
Daveed Diggs, Ethan Hawke, and James McBride
The story of John Brown and Harpers Ferry is a pivotal piece of American history that's neither well-known nor well-understood — to the extent it's known or understood at all. In 1859, Brown, a militant white abolitionist and religious zealot, led a raid on the federal armory in that small Virginia (now West Virginia) town to acquire weapons and spark a slave revolt to end the peculiar institution and cleanse America of its original sin. The raid was a debacle, failing utterly in its immediate objectives, but ultimately helped to set in motion the chain of events that led to the Civil War. In 2013, the writer and musician James McBride published a novel, "The Good Lord Bird," that was a heavily fictionalized but also historically rooted account of Brown's life. The book went on to win the National Book Award for Fiction that year, and, last fall, spawned a seven-part Showtime mini-series, produced by Blumhouse Television, starring and co-created by the celebrated actor Ethan Hawke as Brown (a performance for which Hawke has been nominated for a Golden Globe this year) and Grammy and Tony Award-winning "Hamilton" phenom Daveed Diggs as the Black abolitionist icon Frederick Douglass. The TV incarnation of "The Good Lord Bird" is an incendiary, irreverent, at times hilarious, at times moving entertainment — beautifully written, gorgeously shot, studded with standout performances. But it's also something more than a stellar costume drama. In its treatment of racism not as an individual moral failing but a system of oppression; its examination of white guilt, ally-ship, and redemption; its illustration of the arguments between incrementalism and radicalism; and its forcing of the question of nonviolence versus by-all-means-necessary-ism, "The Good Lord Bird" is, as Matt Zoller Seitz put it in his review for Vulture, “a historical epic of real vision ... [that] speaks to the present as well as the past ... lead[ing] us to connect what happened back then with what’s happening on American streets right now.” As Black History Month comes to a close, Heilemann sits down with Diggs, Hawke, and McBride to discuss the series, their collaboration, and what Hawke has called the "dangerous" territory where art and race intersect — and that "The Good Lord Bird" illuminates so incandescently. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
1 hr 15 min
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