Darknet Diaries
Darknet Diaries
Feb 4, 2020
58: OxyMonster
Play episode · 1 hr 3 min

OxyMonster sold drugs on the darknet at Dream Market. Something happened though, and it all came crashing down.

Sponsors

This episode was sponsored by Detectify. Try their web vulnerability scanner free. Go to https://detectify.com/?utm_source=podcast&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=DARKNET

This episode was sponsored by Molekule, a new air purifier that completely destroys air pollutants to help you breath easier. https://molekule.com to use check out code “DARKNET10” to get a discount.


See complete list of sources at https://darknetdiaries.com/episode/58.


Behind the Bastards
Behind the Bastards
iHeartRadio
Part One: The Jordan Peterson Episode
Robert is joined by Cody Johnston to discuss Jordan Peterson. FOOTNOTES: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/stephaniemlee/jordan-peterson-daughter-mikhaila-meat-carnivore-diet https://newrepublic.com/article/156829/happened-jordan-peterson https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hot-thought/201803/jordan-petersons-murky-maps-meaning https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/03/19/jordan-peterson-and-fascist-mysticism/ https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/18/style/jordan-peterson-12-rules-for-life.html https://www.theguardian.com/science/2018/feb/07/how-dangerous-is-jordan-b-peterson-the-rightwing-professor-who-hit-a-hornets-nest https://thevarsity.ca/2017/10/08/jordan-peterson-i-dont-think-that-men-can-control-crazy-women/ https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/is-jordan-peterson-the-stupid-mans-smart-person/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-profound-sadness-in-jordan-petersons-antidote-to-chaos/2018/05/09/8e1be3a4-53bd-11e8-9c91-7dab596e8252_story.html https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/03/05/jordan-petersons-gospel-of-masculinity https://web.archive.org/web/20200115120600/https://www.thestar.com/opinion/2018/05/25/i-was-jordan-petersons-strongest-supporter-now-i-think-hes-dangerous.html https://web.archive.org/web/20191017142557/https://thewalrus.ca/the-story-behind-jordan-petersons-indigenous-identity/ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hot-thought/201802/jordan-peterson-s-flimsy-philosophy-life?page=1 https://www.theaustralian.com.au/inquirer/the-mysterious-rise-and-fall-of-jordan-peterson/news-story/be72e5ecc722a109ec5ee9d959cd28eb Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
1 hr 37 min
Science Friday
Science Friday
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
Should We Trust Election Forecasting, COVID Dreams. Oct 23, 2020, Part 1
The first “scientific” election poll was conducted in 1936 by George Gallup, who correctly predicted that Franklin D. Roosevelt would win the presidential election. Since Gallup, our appetite for polls and forecasts has only grown, but watching the needle too closely might have some unintended side effects. Solomon Messing, chief scientist at ACRONYM, a political digital strategy nonprofit, tells us about a study he co-authored that found people are often confused by what forecast numbers mean, and that their confidence in an election’s outcome might depress voter turnout. Sunshine Hillygus, professor of political science and public policy at Duke University, also joins to tell us about the history of polling in the United States. Next up, say you're standing in a crowded room and realizing nobody is wearing a mask. Or a family dog that has passed away protectively guarding grandkids. Maybe having a pleasant get-together with someone you haven’t thought of in years, then suddenly realizing everyone is a little too close, and a little too sick. Do any of these instances sound familiar? A few weeks ago, we asked Science Friday listeners if their dreams have changed since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. We heard from many listeners who said yes, their dreams have become more vivid, with elements of the pandemic included. A change in dreams due to a crisis is very common, says Deirdre Barrett, a dream researcher and assistant professor of psychology at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. When we’re in a dream state, the brain is processing the same things we think about during the day. But when we’re asleep, the parts of our brain that handle logic and speech are damped down. The parts that handle visuals, however, are ramped up. Barrett has been collecting dreams from people all over the world since the start of the pandemic. She says common dream themes range from actually getting the virus, natural disasters and bug attacks. Healthcare workers have regularly reported the highest level of stressful COVID-19 dreams, according to her data. “The typical dream from the healthcare workers is really a full-on nightmare,” Barrett says. “Just as bad as you’d see in war zones.” Barrett joins SciFri producer Kathleen Davis to talk about her research into crisis dreams, and what people can do if they want to experience stressful dreams less often. And, search engine giant Google was served an antitrust lawsuit by the Justice Department this week, which alleges the company abuses its near-monopoly status to harm consumers and competitors. This is the first such action against the company, which, over the last couple decades, has grown into one of the more powerful tech companies in history. Meanwhile, early data from New York City schools shows a promising picture of what back-to-school in the age of COVID means. Out of more than 16,000 randomly tested students and staff members, only 28 positive results came back—20 from staff members, and eight from students. While COVID-19 cases in K-12 schools across the country are not zero, low rates are the norm so far. Joining Ira to talk about these stories and other news from the week is Nsikan Akpan, a science editor at National Geographic in Washington, D.C.
47 min
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