Unsexy Ministry
Play • 30 min

Many pastors are attracted to the flashier and more attention-grabbing aspects of ministry, but the most important work is often unnoticed.

On this episode of the podcast, Jared Wilson and Ronnie Martin reflect on the ways the less exciting and less interesting aspects of ministry can be some of the most critical places for us to show up and serve our congregations. Whether it's counseling at a hospital bedside or a short prayer in the hallway of a church, the ordinary, everyday work of pastoring may not be the most glamorous or thrilling, but it can be the very thing God uses to reach and transform his church.

The Art of Pastoring is a production of Christianity Today.

Produced by Mike Cosper

Edited and Mixed by Aaron Leslie

Theme Song "Guide Me O Thou Great Jehovah" by Jeremy Casella

Revived Thoughts
Revived Thoughts
revivedthoughts
Charles Spurgeon: The Good Samaritan
Troy and Joel got to interview the current curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and ask him about Charles Spurgeon's life. Dr. Geoff Chang of the Spurgeon Library did a wonderful job telling us about Spurgeon's life and also narrated this week's episode of Revived Thoughts (he also selected the sermon!). The stories about Spurgeon's time at the orphanage are a must listen! **Make sure to watch the full video on our Facebook page or on our website! Links below** This sermon from Charles Spurgeon challenges us to look at the story of the Good Samaritan and really ask ourselves if we would do what he did. Spurgeon calls out the tough conditions of his time. Check out the Spurgeon Library and the work they are doing by bringing Spurgeon's last sermons out to the public. You can click the link here to learn more about them. We are now partnered with ServeNow! If you would like to give to their ministry that gives bikes to pastors in rural areas around the world so that they can spread the Gospel, please check out their website and their new book: Hope Rising. If you'd like to join the premium team go to our Patreon If you'd like to narrate a sermon, send us an email at revivedthoughts@gmail.com And if you enjoy the show, sharing with friends and a 5 star rating on Apple Podcasts! Facebook Instagram MeWe Twitter Youtube Revived Thoughts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 2 min
As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
What’s at Stake?: Gospel Opportunities and Implications
In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Mike Aitcheson welcome Soong Chan-Rah to discuss reclaiming the church from cultural captivity and the specific ways that Western attitudes of individualism have crept into our modern ministry philosophies. Rah shares insights regarding the ethics of the kingdom and paints a picture of hopes and dreams for the future. Rah focuses on the positive gospel opportunities in addressing race and justice with kingdom ethics. * An introduction to Soong Chan-Rah (:58) * Cultural shifts in objections to the gospel (2:54) * The significance of minority leadership in this shift (9:43) * The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church From Western Cultural Captivity (13:27) * “Captivity” in the conversation (17:11) * Advice for church leadership in these conversations (21:14) * “Aren’t we pas this now?” (28:10) * How important it is for the church to get this cultural moment right (33:55) * What happens when churches dismiss these cultural conversations (37:59) * The church’s two minute drill (42:44) * Hopeful realism (49:21) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * What are some biblical truths that the church stands by that you see the church as failing to live into? * What does it mean that we should embrace “the full biblical narrative”? In the arc of that narrative, which parts of the narrative do you see yourself latching on to more easily? * What are ways that the church has gone into “captivity” to western values? What are ways you have seen this in our bible reading? In our community life? In Christian engagements with social issues? * What are ways that we can remember the sins of our past corporately in regard to how the church has engaged with minority racial groups? What gospel hope does Jesus offer in our remembering? * What are your hopes for the future of the Western Church? How do you hope to see the church embrace values that are biblical, rather than cultural? What would that look like for your local church?
53 min
Life and Books and Everything
Life and Books and Everything
Kevin DeYoung, Collin Hansen, Justin Taylor
Division, Whataboutism, & Christian Nationalism
Why is it so hard to acknowledge when our opponents get something right? Or to admit when we are wrong? Why do so few people see that BOTH this issue AND that issue can be right or wrong? Collin, Justin, and Kevin discuss these divisions that we experience on this episode. They also ask, “What is Christian Nationalism?” Listen to the end for the book recommendations and scroll down for the links.  Life and Books and Everything is sponsored by Crossway, publisher of the Short Studies in Biblical Theology Series, edited by Dane C. Ortlund and Miles V. Van Pelt.   The Short Studies in Biblical Theology Series is designed to help readers see the whole Bible as a unified story culminating in Jesus Christ. In each volume, a trusted scholar traces an important topic through God’s word and explores its significance for the Christian life.  For 30% off this series and all other books and Bibles at Crossway, sign up for a free Crossway+ account at crossway.org/LBE.  Timestamps:  The Best Person to Disagree With [0:00 – 1:46]  Collin’s Jolly Holiday [1:46 – 4:17]  A Brief Digression on Morally Problematic Television [4:17 – 7:34]  Justin’s COVID Christmas [7:34 – 10:53]  VidAngel & Cobra Kai [10:53 – 12:15]  Kevin’s December Viewing [12:15 – 17:45]  Both/And: Why is it so hard to see both sides of an issue? [17:45 – 25:54]  Both/And: Should we even want this approach? [25:54 – 35:23]  Whataboutism & Selective Policing [35:23 – 40:57]  Christian Nationalism [40:57 – 56:16]  Book Recommendations Featuring Pro-Life and MLK, Jr. Topics [56:16 – 1:08:25]  Books and More Books:  The Case for Life: Equipping Christians to Engage the Culture, by Scott Klusendorf  Defending Life, by Francis J. Beckwith  Beyond Racial Gridlock: Embracing Mutual Responsibility, by George Yancey  Letter from a Birmingham Jail, by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times, by David S. Reynolds  The Attributes of God: An Introduction, by Gerald Bray  Forty Questions About the End Times, by Eckhard Schnabel  The Bible and the Future, by Anthony A. Hoekema  Not Tragically Colored: Freedom, Personhood, and the Renewal of Black America, by Ismael Hernandez  America in the King Years, by Taylor Branch  Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade, by Clarke D. Forsythe  Concise Guide to Conservatism, by Russell Kirk  The Myth of the Lost Cause: Why the South Fought the Civil War and Why the North Won, by Edward H. Bonekemper, III  Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theologian, Confessional Presbyterian, by Danny E. Olinger  Make Time: How to Focus on What Matters Every Day, by Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky  Heralds of the King: Christ-Centered Sermons in the Tradition of Edmund P. Clowney, edited by Dennis E. Johnson  For Christ and the University: The Story of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship of the USA - 1940-1990, by Keith Hunt, Gladys Hunt  C. Stacey Woods and the Evangelical Rediscovery of the University, by A. Donald MacLeod  Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture, by Christian Smith  Confronting Injustice without Compromising Truth: 12 Questions Christians Should Ask About Social Justice, by Thaddeus J. Williams  Minds Wide Shut: How the New Fundamentalisms Divide Us, by Gary Saul Morson and Morton Schapiro  R. C. Sproul: A Life, by Stephen J. Nichols
1 hr 8 min
Read the Bible
Read the Bible
The Gospel Coalition, D. A. Carson
January 26 – Vol. 2
In Acts 26, Luke provides the third account in this book of Paul’s conversion (compare Acts 9 and 22). Each has a different aim, of course. Here Paul is defending himself before the Roman Governor Porcius Festus and Herod Agrippa II of Galilee. Important highlights include the following: (1) As in earlier defenses, Paul stresses his continuity with his past in conservative Judaism: he shares with unconverted Jews a “hope” for what God promised to their fathers and an anticipation of the final resurrection (e.g., Acts 24:15; 26:6–7). (2) Paul’s remarkable rhetorical question in Acts 26:8 therefore accomplishes several things at once. He asks: “Why should any of you consider it incredible that God raises the dead?” To Jews who are in the court, the question establishes Paul’s agreement at this point with the Pharisaic strand of Jewish tradition. Implicitly, it also hints that if they have a category for God raising the dead at the end, why should it be thought so impossible that God raised Jesus from the dead in anticipation of the end? To a man like King Agrippa, well acquainted with Jewish beliefs, the question was reinforcing categories with which he was already familiar. To a man like Festus, the question aimed at lessening the skepticism of his sophisticated pagan background. To people with naturalistic outlooks today, the same question remains a challenge: dismissal of the category of resurrection stems from an earlier dismissal of the God of the Bible. Granted the God of the Bible, why is the category of resurrection so difficult? (3) Paul addresses himself primarily to King Agrippa (Acts 26:2, 13, 19), that is, to the ruler most familiar with the Jewish heritage and the Bible. For his part, Festus acknowledges he is at sea (Acts 25:26–27); and for all that he recognizes Paul’s learning, he judges Paul’s claims so bizarre that they only demonstrate he must be insane (Acts 26:24). Had Paul addressed himself most immediately to Festus, perhaps he would have used an approach like that in Acts 17:16–31, the Mars Hill address. (4) Paul’s direct appeal to King Agrippa (Acts 26:25–29) is openly evangelistic and wonderfully direct while remaining perfectly respectful. Paul’s “defense” is not at all defensive; his address reads more like an evangelistic offensive attack than the plea of a frightened or cowed prisoner. Yet just as his “defense” is not defensive, so this “offense” never becomes offensive. (5) Both Festus and Agrippa perceive that, whatever they make of him, Paul has done nothing worthy of death or imprisonment (Acts 26:31). Had this taken place before the events of Acts 25:1–12, Paul would have been released. As it is, appeals to Caesar cannot be undone, so in God’s providence Paul is transported to Rome. _This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan._
3 min
Quick to Listen
Quick to Listen
Christianity Today
Should Christians Worry Free Speech Is Eroding?
For years, one of the primary ways that people experienced Donald Trump was through his tweets. All of that changed on January 8, when, in the aftermath of the capitol insurrection, Twitter banned @realDonaldTrump. “Due to the ongoing tensions in the United States, and an uptick in the global conversation in regards to the people who violently stormed the Capitol on January 6, 2021, these two tweets must be read in the context of broader events in the country and the ways in which the President’s statements can be mobilized by different audiences, including to incite violence, as well as in the context of the pattern of behavior from this account in recent weeks,” read the statement, which included the text of the tweets. “After assessing the language in these Tweets against our Glorification of Violence policy, we have determined that these Tweets are in violation of the Glorification of Violence Policy and the user @realDonaldTrump should be immediately permanently suspended from the service.” Twitter was not the only social media service to crack down on Trump. Snapchat banned him permanently. Facebook banned Trump's account through the remainder of his term and suggested it could ban "indefinitely." Last week, YouTube suspended Trump for a week because they said he violated a violence policy. This flurry of tech moves has raised questions about free speech and left some Christians wondering how well their First Amendment rights will be protected in the midst of this. John Inazu is a professor of law and religion at the Washington University Law School. He is the author of Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving through Deep Difference and more recently, with Tim Keller, Uncommon Ground: Living Faithfully in a World of Difference. Inazu joined global media manager Morgan Lee and editorial director Ted Olsen to discuss the complexity of defining “free speech,” what people misunderstand about the First Amendment, and the blind spots that Christians can have when advocating for free speech. What is Quick to Listen? Read more Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow our hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Follow our guest on Twitter: John Inazu Some of Whitehead and Perry’s Christian nationalism numbers Music by Sweeps Quick to Listen is produced by Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Yvonne Su and Bunmi Ishola Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 5 min
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