Software Daily
Software Daily
Jan 15, 2021
Smart Agriculture with David Potere
Play • 57 min

Agriculture infrastructure allows plants such as corn, soy, and wheat to move from large scale farms to consumers all around the world. The relevant players in the agricultural infrastructure includes growers, shippers, and planners. These individuals need new technology to interact more efficiently. 

Growers need to be able to connect more smoothly with buyers. Farmers need better management of their carbon credits. Microbial technology can allow plants to be better shielded from tough conditions. 

Agricultural health, transport, commerce, and logistics are all problems that Indigo Agriculture is focused on solving. David Potere is head of geoinnovation at Indigo, and joins the show to talk about the problems the company is solving and the engineering practices at Indigo.

Sponsorship inquiries: sponsor@softwareengineeringdaily.com

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Cloudcast
The Cloudcast
Cloudcast Media
How the Cloud is Changing OSS Licensing
Brian looks at the recent changes in open source licensing, as it relates to managed cloud offerings, and how the perception of end-users towards free software vs. cloud services is changing. *#SundayPerspectives* *SHOW: *493 *SHOW SPONSOR LINKS:* * Onix - The Leading Cloud Solutions Provider * Onix - Cloud data strategy workshop offer (FREE, $2000 value) *CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK *- http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotw *CHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - **"CLOUDCAST BASICS"* *SHOW NOTES* * Server Side Public License (SSPL) * What does Open Source mean in the Era of Cloud APIs? (Redmonk) * Cockroach and the Source Available Future (Redmonk) * MongoDB Cloud, MongoDB vs. AWS, MongoDB’s Playbook (Stratechery) * Doubling Down on Open (Elastic) * Evolution of Commercial OSS (The Cloudcast, Eps.492) *THINGS WE KNOW* * Open Source has become a mainstream source for innovation - with most of the Internet being built on OSS technologies (in some way or form) * Open Source is more widely used in the Enterprise (than in the past), beyond just Linux * Open Source is often the de facto choice for much of the public cloud (OS, VMs, DBs, etc.) * The need for a “free” experience is expected for anything new in software or cloud, whether that’s for any/all usage, or a fixed period of time.  * “Open core”, or other variations on free OSS + non OSS (non-free) features has been a concept for quite a while.  * Community driven development does bring a broad set of perspectives, and it distributes the workload across engineers, companies, etc. * Plenty of successful projects have been both Open Source and primarily driven by a single company (especially in the data-centric projects) *THINGS THAT WILL EVOLVE* * Where does the value of software come from? Does it come from the features, from the distribution, from the creator(s), or from how it is run? * Do customers value ‘free”, or “stability” or “customizability” (features) or “operationalization”?  * How much of an advantage or disadvantage (or neutral) is the OSS companies offering cloud services across clouds?  *UNKNOWNS AND UNCERTAINTIES* * How will the VC community view the changes in competitive landscape and licensing? How does it impact their future funding models? *FEEDBACK?* * Email: show at thecloudcast dot net * Twitter: @thecloudcastnet
19 min
Streaming Audio: A Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Streaming Audio: A Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
Confluent, original creators of Apache Kafka®
Becoming Data Driven with Apache Kafka and Stream Processing ft. Daniel Jagielski
When it comes to adopting event-driven architectures, a couple of key considerations often arise: the way that an asynchronous core interacts with external synchronous systems and the question of “how do I refactor my monolith into services?” Daniel Jagielski, a consultant working as a tech lead/dev manager at VirtusLab for Tesco, recounts how these very themes emerged in his work with European clients.  Through observing organizations as they pivot toward becoming real time and event driven, Daniel identifies the benefits of using Apache Kafka® and stream processing for auditing, integration, pub/sub, and event streaming. He describes the differences between a provisioned cluster vs. managed cluster and the importance of this within the Kafka ecosystem. Daniel also dives into the risk detection platform used by Tesco, which he helped build as a VirtusLab consultant and that marries the asynchronous and synchronous worlds. As Tesco migrated from a legacy platform to event streaming, determining risk and anomaly detection patterns have become more important than ever. They need the flexibility to adjust due to changing usage patterns with COVID-19. In this episode, Daniel talks integrations with third parties, push-based actions, and materialized views/projects for APIs. Daniel is a tech lead/dev manager, but he’s also an individual contributor for the Apollo project (an ICE organization) focused on online music usage processing. This means working with data in motion; breaking the monolith (starting with a proof of concept); ETL migration to stream processing, and ingestion via multiple processes that run in parallel with record-level processing. EPISODE LINKS * Building an Apache Kafka Center of Excellence Within Your Organization ft. Neil Buesing  * Risk Management in Retail with Stream Processing * Event Sourcing, Stream Processing and Serverless * It’s Time for Streaming to Have a Maturity Model ft. Nick Dearden * Read Daniel Jagielski's articles on the Confluent blog * Join the Confluent Community * Learn more with Kafka tutorials, resources, and guides at Confluent Developer * Live demo: Kafka streaming in 10 minutes on Confluent Cloud * Use *60PDCAST* to get an additional $60 of free Confluent Cloud usage (details)
48 min
The .NET Core Podcast
The .NET Core Podcast
Jamie Taylor
Picking the Right Azure Resources with Barry Luijbregts
Support for this episode comes from RJJ Software Ltd RJJ Software is dedicated to helping you to realise your company's digital potential through innovative solutions using the latest technologies. Remember: you can also always follow the show on twitter @dotnetcoreshow, and the shows host on twitter @podcasterJay In this episode of the .NET Core Podcast we chatted with Barry Luijbregts (aka Azure Barry) about the many different Azure resources and how to pick the "best" ones for your project The full show notes, including links to some of the things we discussed and a full transcription of this episode, can be found at https://dotnetcore.show/episode-70-picking-the-right-azure-resources-with-barry-luijbregts/ Support for this episode also comes from Datadog. Head over to datadoghq.com/dotnetcore, sign up for a 14-day trial, and claim a free t-shirt! Remember to rate and review the show on Apple Podcasts, Podchaser, or wherever you find your podcasts, this will help the show's audience grow. Or you can just share the show with a friend. You can support the show by making a monthly donation one the show's Patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/TheDotNetCorePodcast The .NET Core Podcast is a proud member of Jay and Jay Media. If you like this episode, please consider supporting our Podcasting Network. One $3 donation provides a week of hosting for all of our shows. You can support this show, and the others like it, at https://ko-fi.com/jayandjaymedia
1 hr 18 min
Tech Lead Journal
Tech Lead Journal
Henry Suryawirawan
#28 - Becoming an Effective Software Engineering Manager - James Stanier
“The output of a manager is the output of the manager’s team plus the output of the organization that they influence." James Stanier is the SVP Engineering at Brandwatch and author of “Become an Effective Software Engineering Manager”. In this episode, we explored on how one can become an effective software engineering manager and how to build and run effective engineering teams. We started off by discussing why the tech industry is facing a skill crisis because of the inability of many managers to manage people effectively and the challenges faced by engineers when transitioning to become managers. We then dived deep into the best practices to become an effective manager, such as getting oriented, delegating effectively, letting go of control, and nurturing one-on-ones with your teams. James also pointed out the hardest things that engineering managers have to deal with, which are projects and humans. We then wrapped up with James’ tips on how to handle failures and move forward. Listen out for: * Career Journey - [00:05:15] * Why Writing Engineering Manager Book - [00:09:08] * Skill Crisis in Tech Industry - [00:12:34] * Individual Contributor Track - [00:15:33] * Getting Oriented Tools - [00:17:45] * Effective Manager - [00:21:47] * Delegating Effectively - [00:27:06] * One-on-Ones - [00:32:10] * Projects and Humans Are Hard - [00:38:05] * On Project Management - [00:40:26] * Letting Go of Control - [00:42:24] * Balancing Time - [00:46:49] * Managing in Startup vs Enterprise - [00:48:29] * Handling Failures - [00:50:24] * 3 Tech Lead Wisdom - [00:51:55] _____ James Stanier’s Bio James Stanier is SVP Engineering at Brandwatch. He has built web scale real time data processing pipelines and teams of people: both are equally challenging. He has written about his experiences on his blog The Engineering Manager, and has turned it into a book called “Become An Effective Software Engineering Manager”. Follow James: * Website – https://theengineeringmanager.com * Twitter – https://twitter.com/jstanier * LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/jstanier/ Our Sponsor Are you looking for a new cool swag? Tech Lead Journal now offers you some swags that you can purchase online. These swags are printed on-demand based on your preference, and will be delivered safely to you all over the world where shipping is available. Check out all the cool swags by visiting https://techleadjournal.dev/shop. Like this episode? Subscribe on your favorite podcast app and submit your feedback. Follow @techleadjournal on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram. Pledge your support by becoming a patron. For more info about the episode (including quotes and transcript), visit techleadjournal.dev/episodes/28.
56 min
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