First Draft - Yishai Sarid
Play • 54 min

Yishai Sarid was born and raised in Tel Aviv Israel. He studied law at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and has a Public Administration Master’s Degree from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is the author of five novels.

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Fiction Writing Made Easy
Fiction Writing Made Easy
Savannah Gilbo
3 Reasons Why You're Not Writing
*In today's episode, I'm going to cover three roadblocks that might be keeping you from writing.* Here's a preview of what's included: [01:45] So much of writing or editing a book has to do with managing your mind. And there’s no getting out of having to manage your mind either -- you can understand story structure, you can study all the books and take all the courses on character creation or worldbuilding or whatever, but until you understand that what you think about is going to create the emotion that either drives the action or inaction, you’re never going to take action. [02:45] Reason #1: You're stuck doing a bunch of busywork. What does this look like? Filling out character questionnaires, spending way too much time worldbuilding, taking all the courses, reading all the books, doing all the "things" -- except writing. [05:05] Reason #2: You're giving yourself too much time to get things done. What does this look like? * *You're putting in the time to “work on your novel”, what you actually produce doesn’t line up with the many hours you’ve been working. [08:45] Reason #3: You're avoiding failure or feelings of discomfort. What does this look like? Not taking chances. Not putting yourself out there. Not finishing a draft. [12:00] Key points and episode recap. *Subscribe & Review in Apple Podcasts* Are you subscribed to my podcast? If you’re not, I want to encourage you to do that today. I don’t want you to miss an episode! Especially because I’m adding a bunch of bonus episodes to the mix and if you’re not subscribed there’s a good chance you’ll miss out on those. So, click here to subscribe to the show in Apple Podcasts! If you're already a subscriber, and if you enjoy the show, I would be really grateful if you left a review over on Apple Podcasts, too. Those reviews help other writers find my podcast and they’re also super fun for me to go in and read. Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” and let me know what your favorite part of the show is. Thanks in advance! *Links mentioned in this episode:* * The #1 Myth That Holds Writers Back (podcast and article) P.S. Did you know that I have a Facebook group just for fiction writers? In this private group, we talk about all things writing, editing, and publishing fiction. It's free to join and you can request access here. Hope to see you there!
14 min
The Lonely Palette
The Lonely Palette
Tamar Avishai
BonusEp 0.4: Tamar Avishai interviews Ralph Steadman
You’ve seen the work of 84-year-old Welsh artist and illustrator Ralph Steadman, even if you haven’t realized it. His searing political caricature and trademark flying ink spatter have illustrated major works of literature and journalism for the past half-century – and most notably the hallucinogenic writing of Hunter S. Thompson, resulting in an alchemic collaboration that wove together journalism and illustration to create what history has described as Gonzo, and what Steadman calls the meeting between an ex-Hell’s Angel with a shaved head and a matted-haired geek with string warts. We spoke in advance of his new retrospective, “Ralph Steadman: A Life in Ink,” and talked about this storied, ink-stained career: what it means to illustrate depravity, how a caricature can capture both body and soul, and where to look for the ever-present birdsong that undergirds our current doom. [2:18]: Love of Picasso and Duchamp. [3:11]: Where do you start with caricature, the body or the soul? [5:40]: Drawing with a pen – “no such thing as a mistake.” [7:09]: The difference between illustration and “fine art”. [9:55]: Use of the geometric in Steadman’s work, ink spatter, a conversation with the paper. [13:10]: Coming to the U.S. in 1970, David Hockney “Paranoids”. [14:30]: Use of photographs and text in drawing. [15:15]: I, Leonardo, the terror of the blank canvas, and “prorogation”. [17:53]: Style, “exposing depravity” and being purified by drawing it. [22:33]: Early career before collaborating with Hunter S. Thompson, alchemy, gonzo. [29:08]: Favorite faces to draw. [30:48]: 2020, the pandemic, and finding the birdsong in doom. Interview Webpage: http://bit.ly/38erSJX Music Used: The Blue Dot Sessions, "Crumbtown" Support the Show: www.patreon.com/lonelypalette
37 min
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
The Writer Files: Writing, Productivity, Creativity, and Neuroscience
Kelton Reid
How NY Times Bestselling Author Craig Johnson Writes
#PodcastersForJustice The award-winning mystery writer and popular crime novelist, Craig Johnson, spoke with me about his long-running Longmire series, shotgun self-realization, and how to write good books. "How am I ever gonna get seen? Write good books." — Craig Johnson Craig is the New York Times bestselling author of the Longmire mysteries, the bedrock of the hit Netflix series of the same name. His latest novel is the 16th Sheriff Walt Longmire murder mystery, Next to Last Stand, a story that centers around Custer’s Last Fight, one of the most viewed paintings in American history. "Custer's Last Fight was copied and distributed by Anheuser-Busch at a rate of over two million copies a year and destroyed in a fire at the 7th Cavalry Headquarters in Fort Bliss, Texas, in 1946 . . . Or was it?" In a starred review, Library Journal said of the book, "... Johnson lightens the atmosphere in this complex, thought-provoking mystery that highlights art and Western history, emphasizing the contrast between Native accounts and white history." Craig is also the recipient of the Western Writers of America Spur Award for fiction, the Mountain & Plains Independent Booksellers Association's Reading the West Book Award for fiction, the Nouvel Observateur Prix du Roman Noir, and the Prix SNCF du Polar. If you’re a fan of The Writer Files, please click subscribe to automatically see new interviews. In this file Craig Johnson and I discussed: * Why he chose to feature veterans in his latest book * The wisdom behind "Choose a job you love..." * How to host a virtual book tour event * His special relationship with the cast and crew of the Longmire TV series * And more! Show Notes: * CraigAllenJohnson.com * Next to Last Stand: A Longmire Mystery by Craig Johnson [Amazon] * Craig Johnson Amazon author page * Tinderbox: Soldier of Indira by Lou Diamond Phillips [Amazon] * Craig Johnson on FaceBook * Craig Johnson on Instagram * Craig Johnson on Twitter * Kelton Reid on Twitter
27 min
Lingthusiasm - A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics
Lingthusiasm - A podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics
Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne
51: Small talk, big deal
“Cold enough for ya?” “Nice weather for ducks.” Small talk is a valuable piece of our social interactions -- it can be a way of having a momentary exchange with someone you don’t know very well or a bridge into getting to know someone better by figuring out which deeper conversational topics might be of mutual interest. In this episode of Lingthusiasm, your hosts Lauren Gawne and Gretchen McCulloch get enthusiastic about the science behind small talk: how we pick topics for small talk conversation, the fine art of media references from memes to movies, and our own tested strategies for dodging awkward small talk questions while keeping the conversation flowing, such as when you’re having a not-great time but don’t want to talk about it, and that ubiquitous linguist question “so, how many languages do you know?” This month’s bonus episode is a Q&A with lexicographer Emily Brewster of Merriam-Webster! Gretchen and Lauren get enthusiastic about the process of making dictionaries, posing your patron questions to lexicographer Emily Brewster of Merriam-Webster. We also talk about how lexicography has changed since dictionaries went online and in the era of social media, and the extremely esoteric process of getting lexicography jobs. Get all your lexicography questions answers, as well as access to 45 other bonus episodes by becoming a Patron! https://www.patreon.com/lingthusiasm Announcements Crash Course Linguistics videos are available now and coming out weekly! https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8dPuuaLjXtP5mp25nStsuDzk2blncJDW Keep an eye out for them around 2pm North American Eastern Time on Fridays for the rest of 2020 (except a few holiday Fridays) and into early 2021. If you want to get an email each week with some further reading and practice exercises on each topic, you can also check out the companion issues of Mutual Intelligibility. https://mutualintelligibility.substack.com/ Become a Patron and get access to the Crash Course channel in the Lingthusiasm Discord to chat about each episode! https://lingthusiasm.com/discord For links to all the things mentioned in this episode: https://lingthusiasm.com/post/637790657255227392/lingthusiasm-episode-51-small-talk-big-deal
41 min
Science Diction
Science Diction
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
How Do You Name A Hurricane?
How did we wind up with a storm named Iota? Well, we ran out of hurricane names. Every year, the World Meteorological Organization puts out a list of 21 names for the season’s hurricanes and tropical storms. But this year, the Atlantic hurricane season was so active that by September, we'd flown through the whole list of names and had to switch to the Greek alphabet. Thus, Hurricane Iota became the 30th named storm of the season. We’ve only had to dip into the Greek alphabet once before, in 2005. But the practice of naming hurricanes goes back to the 19th century, and it was a bit of a bumpy ride to land on the system we use today. In this episode: The story of a meteorologist in Australia, a novel, and a second-wave feminist from Florida—and how they brought us hurricane names. Guests: Christina M. Gonzalez is a doctoral candidate in anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin. Liz Skilton is a historian and the author of Tempest: Hurricane Naming and American Culture. Footnotes & Further Reading: For more hurricane history, check out A Furious Sky: The Five-Hundred-Year History of America's Hurricanes by Eric Jay Dolin. To learn more about Roxcy Bolton and the fight to change the naming system, read Liz Skilton’s article “Gendering Natural Disaster: The Battle Over Female Hurricane Names.” Credits: Science Diction is hosted and produced by Johanna Mayer. Our editor and producer is Elah Feder. We had story editing from Nathan Tobey, and fact checking by Michelle Harris. Our composer is Daniel Peterschmidt. Chris Wood did sound design and mastered the episode. Special thanks to the Florida State Library & Archives for allowing us use footage from Roxcy Bolton’s oral history interview. Nadja Oertelt is our chief content officer.
22 min
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
TED
A Black Utopia In North Carolina
“I thought I'd come to paradise,” said Jane Ball Groom upon arriving in Soul City, North Carolina. It wasn’t amenities or location that made Soul City paradise, but the promise of what it could be: a city built by Black people, for Black people. Our guests take us back to 1969 when the city was founded and built from (below) the ground up — and while the city itself was short-lived, we’ll see how the seeds it sowed laid roots for spaces that celebrate and center Black culture today. That's a wrap on the season! Share you stand out moments with host Saleem Reshamwala on Twitter (@Kidethic). For photos from the episode and more on the history of Soul City, head to the Souvenir Book of Soul City in the North Carolina digital collections. Special thanks to Shirlette Ammons who we could not do this story without, and our guests Charmaine McKissick-Melton, Jane Ball-Groom, Lianndra Davis, Lou Myers, Tobias Rose, and Derrick Beasley. Extra special thank you to Alan Thompson, who recorded the saxophone music you heard in this episode from Parish Street on Durham’s Black Wall Street. Our unsung hero for this week is Sammy Case who manages the cross-promotions for all of TED's podcasts - if you found Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala from one of your other favorite shows, she’s the reason why! Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala is produced by Jesse Baker and Eric Nuzum of Magnificent Noise for TED. Our host is Saleem Reshamwala. Our production staff includes Hiwote Getaneh, Sabrina Farhi, Kim Nederveen Pieterse, Elyse Blennerhassett, Angela Cheng, and Michelle Quint, with the guidance of Roxanne Hai Lash and Colin Helms. Our fact-checker is Abbey White. This episode was mixed and sound designed by Kristin Mueller. We're doing a survey! If you have a minute, please take it at surveynerds.com/farflung. It really helps make the show better.
57 min
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