Holiday Cards
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Make your holiday cards a little different this year--and use them to show what in these crazy times has made you grateful

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The Brain Architects
The Brain Architects
Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Connecting Health and Learning Part I: The Science
How do our biological systems work together to respond to chronic stress? What do these responses mean for early learning and lifelong health? And when we say that early experiences matter, what do we mean by early? This episode of The Brain Architects podcast addresses all these questions and more! Contents Podcast Panelists Additional Resources Transcript To kick off this episode, Center Director Dr. Jack Shonkoff describes the body's stress response system, how our biological systems act as a team when responding to chronic stress, and the effects chronic stress can have on lifelong health. This is followed by a discussion among a panel of scientists including Dr. Nicki Bush (University of California-San Francisco),  Dr. Damien Fair (University of Minnesota),  and Dr. Fernando Martinez (University of Arizona). The panelists discuss how our bodies respond to adversity, inflammation's role in the stress response system, the effects of stress during the prenatal period and first few years after birth, and how we can use this science to prevent long-term impacts on our health. Panelists Dr. Nicki Bush Dr. Damien Fair Dr. Fernando Martinez Additional Resources Resources from the Center on the Developing Child Working Paper 15: Connecting the Brain to the Rest of the Body: Early Childhood Development and Lifelong Health Are Deeply Intertwined InBrief: Connecting the Brain to the Rest of the Body Health and Learning Are Deeply Interconnected in the Body: An Action Guide for Policymakers What Is Inflammation? And Why Does it Matter for Child Development? How Racism Can Affect Child Development Articles Biel, M.G., Tang, M.H., & Zuckerman, B. (2020). Pediatric mental health care must be family mental health care. JAMA Pediatrics, 174(6):519-520. Boyce, W.T., Levitt, P., Martinez, F.D., McEwen, B.S., & Shonkoff, J.P. Genes, environments, and time: The biology of adversity and resilience. Pediatrics. In press. Bush, N.R., Savitz, J., Coccia, M., et al. (2020). Maternal stress during pregnancy predicts infant infectious and noninfectious illness. The Journal of Pediatrics. Graignic-Philippe, R., Dayan, J., Chokron, S., et al. (2014). Effects of prenatal stress on fetal and child development: A critical literature review. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 43, 137-162. LeWinn, K.Z., Bush, N.R., Batra, A.B., et al. (2020). Identification of modifiable social and behavioral factors associated with child cognitive performance. JAMA Pediatrics, 174(11):1063-1072. O’Connor, T.G., Monk, C., & Fitelson, E.M. (2014). Practitioner review: Maternal mood in pregnancy and child development: Implications for child psychology and psychiatry. J Child Psychol Psychiatry, 55(2): 99-111. Racine, N., Plamondon, A., Madigan, S., et al. (2018). Maternal adverse childhood experiences and infant development. Pediatrics, 141(4). Shonkoff, J.P., Boyce, W.T., Levitt, P., P., Martinez, F.D., & McEwen, B.S. Leveraging the biology of adversity and resilience to transform pediatric practice. Pediatrics. In press. Shonkoff, J.P., Slopen, N., & Williams, D. Early childhood adversity, toxic stress, and the impacts of racism on the foundations of health. Annual Review of Public Health. In press. Transcript Sally: Welcome to The Brain Architects, a podcast from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. I'm your host Sally Pfitzer. Our center believes that advances in science can provide a powerful source of new ideas that can improve outcomes for children and families. We want to help you apply the science of early childhood development to your everyday interactions with children and take what you're hearing from our experts and panels and apply it to your everyday work. In today's episode, we'll discuss how early experiences, especially during the prenatal period and first few years after a baby is born,
39 min
At The End of The Tunnel
At The End of The Tunnel
Light Watkins
IN-Q on His Non-Linear Journey of Becoming a National Poetry Slam champion and the Lessons Learned Along the Way - Ep 034
Today’s guest is somebody who inspires a lot of people with his words. His name is Adam Schmalholz, but you may be more familiar with his stage name, IN-Q, which stands for IN-Question. IN-Q is a National Poetry Slam champion, award-winning poet, multi-platinum songwriter, recent first-time author, and one of the most electric spoken word performers on the scene.  In this episode, you’ll discover that his backstory is equally as fascinating as his poems. Listening to this conversation, you’ll find out how he first discovered his gift for poetry in school and how he went on to develop and refine his unique style. You’ll hear about the lean years, when IN-Q had no way of making money as a spoken word poet, when he had to pay for food with pocket change and work odd jobs to survive.  You’ll also learn that, after putting in well over 10,000 hours in writing and performing, IN-Q finally had the opportunity to perform for people like Quincy Jones, Hillary Clinton, and even President Barack Obama. He went on to win awards, get featured on Def Poetry Jam and Oprah's Super Soul 100 List. His spoken word videos have received nearly 100 million views and he has sold out as the largest one-man poetry show in Los Angeles history.  Like most changemakers, IN-Q’s backstory was not linear. All of the ups and the downs played a crucial role in navigating him along his path, and that is what makes his story so compelling – it’s something that we can all relate to. Tune in today to find out more about IN-Q’s incredible journey. Key Points From This Episode: • IN-Q’s favorite toy as a child was a G.I. Joe Snake Eyes action figure, perhaps because mystery makes history. • IN-Q talks about what it was like for him, not having his father around while he grew up. • His natural attraction to subjects that dealt with storytelling in school – like English. • When IN-Q was first introduced to hip-hop and the impact it had on him. • From Will Smith to Run DMC and A Tribe Called Quest – how IN-Q’s taste in hip-hop evolved. • Practicing his freestyle, learning to focus his energy, and the mentor he had at a young age. • What IN-Q’s idea of success was at that age and what he saw himself becoming. • The problem with setting high expectations for yourself and manipulating your truth in order to achieve them. • Freestyle versus written material and the incredible number of poems IN-Q has memorized. • IN-Q’s first rap name, and how he became known as IN-Q thanks to his curious nature. • Hear the story of when IN-Q met his father for the first time – Spoiler alert: It didn’t go well! • How IN-Q was first introduced to Da Poetry Lounge and ended up staying for 14 years. • The differences between music and spoken word poetry and what that shift was like for him. • How IN-Q funded his dreams during the lean years and the obsession that drove him. • Where IN-Q’s philosophical perspective on life came from – that he couldn’t control life, only go along for the ride. • Learn about the incredible support IN-Q received from his community in the early days. • IN-Q talks about his relationship with actor and poet, Omari Hardwick, and how Def Poetry Jam changed (or didn’t change) his life. • What IN-Q has learned from performing for and connecting with strangers versus those who are already familiar with his work. • The importance of setting clear boundaries and asking others to respect them. • When IN-Q says he is still finding his voice, it means that he is ever-evolving and learning. • Where the commentary starts and the poem begins – and why the story is key. • Find out how IN-Q came up with the idea for the cover of his book, Inquire Within. • How the collaborative project, Speakeasy Poetry, came to fruition and what it’s all about.
1 hr 33 min
Women Who Travel
Women Who Travel
Condé Nast Traveler
Travel Host Samantha Brown on Spending Nearly a Year at Home
When we last spoke to travel host Samantha Brown in 2018, a border-shuttering, flight-grounding pandemic was nowhere on our radar. Flash forward to March 2020, and a season's worth of filming and production planning for her show, Places to Love, was canceled in a matter of weeks. For the first time in years, she's been staying put in Brooklyn, where she lives with her husband and twins. “I always knew that I love to travel, but I didn't realize that it was just so ingrained in who I was,” she tells us on this week's episode. “Whether it's in an airport, or getting a meal, or someone I talk to at a hotel who helps me get to my next destination … I just love those quick spontaneous meetings with strangers. That's what I miss the most.” In our first episode of 2021, we're catching up with Samantha to talk about how she's spent the last year mostly at home, what it took to film a few episodes of Places to Love amid the pandemic in the fall, and what travel trends we might see when we get to the other side.  Follow Samantha: @samanthabrowntravels Follow Lale: @lalehannah Follow Meredith: @ohheytheremere Follow Women Who Travel: @womenwhotravel Subscribe to the Women Who Travel newsletter: https://www.cntraveler.com/newsletter/subscribe Read a full transcription here: www.cntraveler.com/story/travel-host-samantha-brown-on-spending-nearly-a-year-at-home-women-who-travel-podcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
31 min
The Slow Home Podcast
The Slow Home Podcast
Brooke McAlary
Meditation, acceptance and relinquishing control with Kevin Janks - Life in the Time of Covid-19
We've all heard about the transformative power of meditation, but how can we access it when uncertainty, stress and living through a pandemic make it difficult to simply sit still and breathe?  In today's episode Brooke is joined by friend of the show and founder of Centred Meditation, Kevin Janks, to talk through the power of meditation in challenging times.  Meditation allows us to decompress from 'fight or flight' mode and as Kevin explains, the time investment doesn’t need to be excessive. (Research has found that meditating for as little as 12 minutes a day can have a substantial impact over the course of three weeks). It can also be used to shift our perception of control, which is often the overriding emotion during times of crisis, and by doing so, release us from the stress of trying to control and uncontrollable situation. Kevin also shares how meditation allows us to accept the current circumstances we find ourselves in (not in order to accept and give up, but in order to simply accept the way things are at the moment) and use that freedom to look at how we will move forward when we're able.  There's so much to be taken from meditation, particularly during such stressful times, and this conversation with Kevin is full of tools and takeaways that will hopefully help you.  Enjoy!  Looking for more Slow? Find show notes, resources and links at slowyourhome.com/season6 Follow us on Instagram @slowhomepod Sign up for the Slow Post, Brooke's weekly slow-living love letters  Or leave a rating or review in iTunes Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/slow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
40 min
Unwasted: The Podcast
Unwasted: The Podcast
Imperfect Foods
Understanding Our Grandmothers' Recipes With Hawa Hassan
Nothing makes you feel quite as warm, fuzzy, and cozy as eating some of  your comfort foods from childhood. What is it about these meals that is so magical? How can they bring us meaning and connection even across oceans and decades?  Hawa Hassan has spent her life exploring the magical power of family memories and recipes. She turned this experience into a marvellous cookbook called “In Bibi's Kitchen: The Recipes and Stories of Grandmothers from the Eight African Countries that Touch the Indian Ocean.”  In it, she shares the recipes of 8 African grandmothers and writes a moving and delicious love letter to African food that’s also a thought-provoking testament to the universal power of family recipes. We're chatting food, family, spices, and more with Hawa!  *Episode Show Notes:* * Learn more about Hawa on her Instagram and be sure to check out her amazing cookbook. * Our photo of Hawa comes from photographer Khadija M. Farah.  * Hawa also has an incredible line of hot sauces called Basbaass.  * Some of Hawa's go-to spices to have you your pantry to make Somali food are: cardamon, cumin, cinnamon, cloves, and black pepper.  * Hawa is also a big fan of Xawaash, a Yemeni spice blend that Hawa often calls the "Garam Masala of Somali cuisine."  * Learn how to make Hawa's Suugo Suqaar, a delicious Somali take on pasta sauce.  * Hawa's go-to karaoke song is "Man! I Feel Like A Woman!" by Shania Twain.
39 min
Good Life Project
Good Life Project
Jonathan Fields / Wondery
Unlocking Your Brain's Potential | Dr. Ryan D'Arcy
For generations, when it came to your brain, we pretty much assumed that once you reach adulthood, it pretty much is what it is. That meant you couldn’t get smarter or faster or wittier or optimize it to perform at a higher level and, on the other side, if you suffered an injury, there was very little you could do to help your brain recover or even rewire itself to function at a higher level again. Turns out, much of that was wrong, and my guest today, Dr. Ryan D’Arcy, is an acclaimed neuroscientist and entrepreneur who is at the leading edge of this awakening.  The co-founder, President, and Chief Scientific Officer of HealthTech Connex a brain health technology company, he also holds Professorship appointments at Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia, where he serves as a BC Leadership Chair in neuroimaging and neurotechnology. He has published more than 260 academic works, and led major scientific advances include the discovery of white matter activation in functional MRI, the world's first VR simulator for neurosurgical training and planning, the development and deployment of the world's first brain vital sign framework, and the utilization of neuroplasticity in brain injury to drive recovery well beyond conventional limits. Today, we’re talking about some of the incredible innovations in brain science across the four domains of performance optimization, mental health, neurological diseases, and brain injury recovery and you are going to be amazed at the work he and others are doing and where things are heading. You can find Dr. Ryan D'Arcy at: Website: https://healthtechconnex.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/neurocatch/ Check out our offerings & partners:  Fundrise: Fundrise.com/GOODLIFE Plushcare: PlushCare.com/GOODLIFE
1 hr 2 min
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