The Wine Challenge
Play • 6 min

Our mindset is so important that it can even change how we experience the taste of a wine. You can prime your brain to look for the best part of any situation

Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Go Help Yourself: A Comedy Self-Help Podcast to Make Life Suck Less
Go Help Yourself: A Comedy Self-Help Podcast to Make Life Suck Less
Misty Stinnett & Lisa Linke
The Mastery of Love: A Practical Guide to the Art of Relationship: A Toltec Wisdom Book by Don Miguel Ruiz and Janet Mills
This week, Misty and Lisa review The Mastery of Love: A Practical Guide to the Art of Relationship: A Toltec Wisdom Book by Don Miguel Ruiz and Janet Mills. Don Miguel Ruiz is the bestselling author of The Four Agreements (a New York Times bestseller for over a decade), The Four Agreements Companion Book, The Mastery of Love, The Voice of Knowledge, The Circle of Fire, and The Fifth Agreement. Janet Mills is the founder and president of Amber-Allen Publishing and co-author, with don Miguel Ruiz, of six books in The Toltec Wisdom Series. Mills is also the creator of "The Four Agreements for a Better Life" online course, editor of Deepak Chopra's bestselling title, The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, and the publisher of 11 world-renowned "Seth" books by Jane Roberts, which have been credited with launching the New Age movement. We cover the main ideas of the book in this Mastery of Love book review podcast, including: * The Wounded Mind * The Loss of Innocence * The Track of Love, The Track of Fear * The Magical Kitchen * and more If you like what you're hearing, you can purchase the book here. If you'd like to learn more about the authors' work, you can visit their website here. Make sure to check out our Patreon for ways to support the podcast (and get exclusive perks!) and don't forget to grab your GHY merch!
47 min
Psychologists Off The Clock
Psychologists Off The Clock
Diana Hill, Debbie Sorensen, Yael Schonbrun & Jill Stoddard
186. Set Boundaries Find Peace with Nedra Tawwab
Setting healthy boundaries can be challenging, whether it is with someone you love or someone you dislike. Sticking with your boundaries once you set them, is also difficult. Relationship expert Nedra Tawwab, author of Set Boundaries, Find Peace, has the insight and tools you need to set boundaries so that you can thrive. In this episode, Diana and Nedra discuss strategies to overcome barriers to boundary setting so that you can set boundaries and find peace today! Listen and Learn: Diana and Jill’s take on the importance of boundary setting Nedra’s expert definition of boundaries and explanation of how they impact mental healthThe science behind how setting healthy boundaries can provide peace and freedom from anxietyPractical advice on how to set boundaries with toxic individuals, narcissists, your parents, your in-laws, your children, and yourself!Barriers that might be affecting your ability to set a healthy boundaryWhat to do with the feeling of guilt when it shows up during the boundary-setting processNedra’s practical advice on how to be a clear communicator and set effective boundaries in particularly toxic dynamicsThe differences between a soft boundary and a rigid boundary (and when to be flexible with them!)What clear boundaries sound likeThe subtle differences between assertiveness, aggressiveness, and passivityNedra’s take on setting ultimatums (and why they aren’t always a bad thing)Why it’s important to set boundaries with your kids and how to teach them to set their own Nedra’s personal experience with boundaries and how setting them has changed her life Resources: Nedra’s book, Set Boundaries, Find Peace: A Guide to Reclaiming Yourself Nedra’s website which has TONS of FREE resources including worksheets, a relationship quiz, a boundaries quiz, and Nedra's book recommendationsCheck out co-host Diana’s workshop, An Introduction to ACT: Growing Psychological Flexibility through Acceptance, Caring, and Tiny Daily Practices on February 28th from 2pm to 5pm Pacific Standard Time  About Nedra Tawwab: NEDRA GLOVER TAWWAB, a licensed therapist and sought-after relationship expert, has practiced relationship therapy for twelve years and is the founder and owner of the group therapy practice Kaleidoscope Counseling. She has been recently featured in The New York Times, The Guardian, Psychology Today, Self, and Vice, and has appeared on numerous podcasts, including Don't Keep Your Day Job, Do the Thing, and Therapy for Black Girls. Tawwab runs a popular Instagram account where she shares practices, tools, and reflections for mental health and hosts weekly Q&As about boundaries and relationships. She lives in Charlotte, North Carolina, with her family. Connect with Nedra Tawwab on Instagram @nedratawwab. Find out more about her book, here.  Related Episodes: Episode 98. Narcissism with Dr. Avigail Lev and Dr. Robyn Walser Episode 174. How to Work and Parent Mindfully with Lori Mihalich-LevinEpisode 168. Everyday Conversations: How Conversational Style Impacts Relationships with Deborah TannenEpisode 134. What to do When Work, Parenting, and Partnership Collide During Quarantine
54 min
The Brain Architects
The Brain Architects
Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University
Connecting Health and Learning Part II: The Implications
How do we use the science of early childhood development to implement practical strategies and overcome longstanding barriers in the early childhood field? How can we ensure that families' voices are heard when we create policies or programs? Contents Podcast Panelists Additional Resources Transcript To kick off this episode, Center Director Dr. Jack Shonkoff describes what the science means for policymakers, system leaders, care providers, and caregivers. This is followed by a discussion among a distinguished panel of experts, including Cindy Mann (Manatt Health), Dr. Aaliyah Samuel (Northwest Evaluation Association), and Jane Witowski (Help Me Grow). The panelists discuss how we can break down the silos in the early childhood field, policies affecting prenatal-three, and how policies can change to address the stressors inflicted by poverty, community violence, and racism. Panelists Cindy Mann Dr. Aaliyah Samuel Jane Witowski Additional Resources Resources from the Center on the Developing Child The Brain Architects: Connecting Health & Learning Part I: The Science Working Paper 15: Connecting the Brain to the Rest of the Body: Early Childhood Development and Lifelong Health Are Deeply Intertwined InBrief: Connecting the Brain to the Rest of the Body Health and Learning Are Deeply Interconnected in the Body: An Action Guide for Policymakers What Is Inflammation? And Why Does it Matter for Child Development? How Racism Can Affect Child Development Resources from the Panelists Testing America's Freedom Podcast Help Me Grow National Center Transcript Sally: Welcome to the Brain Architects, a podcast from the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. I'm your host, Sally Pfitzer. Our Center believes that advances in science can provide a powerful source of new ideas that can improve outcomes for children and families. We want to help you apply the science of early childhood development to your everyday interactions with children and take what you're hearing from our experts and panels and apply it to your everyday work.  Today, we'll discuss how the science we shared in our previous episode, on the early years and lifelong health, can change the way we think about early childhood policy and practice, and what this shift means for policymakers, practitioners, and caregivers. So, I'd like to welcome back Dr. Jack Shonkoff, Professor of Child Health and Development and the Director of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University. Hi, Jack. Welcome back.  Jack: Hey, Sally.  Sally:  So we talked in the last episode about how the brain is connected to the rest of the body, and especially how the early years really matter when it comes to lifelong health. What does this science mean for policymakers, system leaders, or even caregivers?  Jack: That's a really important question, Sally. From the beginning of the early childhood field, it's always been focused on early learning and improving children's readiness to succeed in school. In the policy world, it's in education policy, comes out of the education budget. For people who work in early childhood programs, and for parents, it's about programs that encourage and provide rich learning opportunities for children to develop early literacy competencies.  But the mindset shift here is that it's not just about early learning in school—it's about the foundations of physical and mental health. It's not just about improving outcomes for greater economic productivity—better educational achievement. It's also about decreasing the likelihood that you'll develop heart disease or hypertension, or diabetes, or a wide range of the most common chronic illnesses in society. It's not just a matter of return on investment—asking “So, how much more economically productive will the population be? How much will we save in incarceration?
45 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu