Before Breakfast
Before Breakfast
Nov 28, 2020
Second Cup: Nurture your virtual relationships
Play • 7 min

How to stay connected with people you don’t see in person

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Teach Me, Teacher
Teach Me, Teacher
Teach Me, Teacher LLC
#194 Go the Extra Mile (CJ Reynolds pt.2)
Hello everyone! Educators DO A LOT to make sure kids get the content they need. They stay late to tutor. They craft lessons on the weekends and over breaks. They think and plan, and think and plan, and do it because it is all for the kids! One of my favorite educators modeling this right now is the wonderful CJ Reynolds, author of the fantastic book, Teach Your Class Off. In this episode we continue our talk about how CJ believes we should all be going the extra mile to build quality relationships with students, and meeting them where they are through their interests. We talk about why he loves pushing what is possible with students, and how doing something as simple as decorating your class to achieve a specific vibe might seem small, but could mean the world to your students. It's not enough to be good. We have to take the extra step to be great. It's for the kids!      This episode is sponsored by Heinemann—the leading publisher of professional books and resources for educators—and their new book Connecting with Students Online by Jennifer Serravallo. This book’s been getting a lot of buzz because finally someone is getting down to the nitty gritty details of effective online teaching during an unprecedented crisis. Jen Serravallo keeps the focus on what teachers do best: build relationships with students that drive learning and progress. And she shows how to do it remotely. She offers 55 streamlined instructional strategies we can use right away. Everything from conferring to small groups to communicating with a child’s parents or caregivers. Like everything Jen writes, Connecting with Students Online is accessible and respectful of teacher’s time. It’s filled with ready-to-use suggestions, and you don’t need a school technologist to implement them. You’ll find something here to help everyone in your classroom grow, even if you can’t be with them in person. Best of all, Jen will donate a portion of the proceeds from this book to organizations that help children directly impacted by COVID-19. If you don’t have Jennifer Serravallo’s Connecting with Students Online, head over to Heinemann.com to read a sample chapter and find out what you’re missing. Or order yourself a copy. You’ll help yourself, your kids, and children struggling because of this this pandemic.
Play
10 Minute Teacher Podcast
10 Minute Teacher Podcast
Vicki Davis
717 A Look Back at 2020 Teaching What It Means for 2021 with Pamela Livingston Gaudet
Yes, 2020 has been a year like no other, and today's guest, Pamela Livingston Guadet, interviewed a wide variety of school tech directors to hear their stories of triage teaching during the COVID-19 emergency. Today, she shares their wisdom, including the positives, negatives, the things that shocked her, and what her research shows that everyone should know about moving forward in 2021. Pamela is the author of the book, “Like No Other School Year: 2020, COVID-19 and the Growth of Online Learning." Sponsor: It’s a new year and time to plan your professional development with Advancement Courses. They offer over 280 online graduate-level PD courses in 20 subject areas. They are online and self-paced, so you can take them anywhere, any time with up to six months to complete. Receive graduate credit through CAEP and regionally accredited university partners or for continuing education units that meet your state requirements. And right now, you can save 20% off each course with the code COOL20 -- that’s just $120 per graduate credit hour or $160 for 50 clock hours. Go to advancementcourses.com/coolcat and use the coupon code COOL20. www.coolcatteacher.com/e717 Pamela Livingston Gaudet - Bio As Submitted Pamela (Livingston) Gaudet is the author of “Like No Other School Year: 2020, COVID-19 and the Growth of Online Learning” For the book, Pamela interviewed public, independent and international school technology directors to hear their stories of triage teaching during the COVID-19 emergency including what was important and what is still needed for online learning. Pamela was a technology director and teacher at public, charter and independent schools and then moved to education technology companies where she built products used by millions of students in K-12 schools. Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored podcast episode.” The company who sponsored it compensated me via cash payment, gift, or something else of value to include a reference to their product. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I believe will be good for my readers and are from companies I can recommend. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
13 min
But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids
But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids
Vermont Public Radio
What's A Screaming Hairy Armadillo? How Animals Get Their Names
Why are whale sharks called whale sharks? Why are guinea pigs called pigs if they're not pigs? Why are eagles called bald eagles if they're not bald? You also ask us lots of questions about why and how animals got their names. So today we're going to introduce you to the concept of taxonomy, or how animals are categorized, and we'll also talk about the difference between scientific and common names. We'll learn about the reasoning behind the names of daddy long legs, killer whales, fox snakes, German shepherds and more! Our guests are Steve and Matt Murrie, authors of The Screaming Hairy Armadillo, and 76 Other Animals With Weird Wild Names. Download our learning guides: PDF | Google Slide | Transcript There are some animals whose names don't really seem accurate-like daddy long legs...which certainly aren't all daddies! Or bald eagles that very clearly have plenty of feathers on their heads. Or guinea pigs, which aren't actually pigs! And then there are animals with awesomely silly names. Have you ever heard of the umbrella bird? How about the sparklemuffin peacock spider! Or the monkeyface prickleback, the sarcastic fringehead, and the white-bellied go-away bird! How do animals get their names? Well, there are two types of animal names: Scientific names and common names. Scientific names are used as a way to categorize all living things, so even if you don't know a lot about an animal, you can learn a lot about them by knowing their scientific name. There are eight different levels that living things get grouped into: domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus and species. The broadest category is called the domain. There are three domains: archaea, bacteria, and eucarya. Bacteria and archaea are both categories of micro-organisms. All animals and plants belong in the eucarya domain. Below domain is kingdom. There's a kingdom for animals called Animalia and a kingdom for plants called plantae. (And a few others as well.) As you go through the classification system it gets more and more specific. So, take humans: we belong to the eucarya domain, the animalia kingdom, the chordata phylum (because we have a backbone), the mammalia class (because we're mammals), the primate order, homonidae family, homo is our genus and homo sapien is our species name. All species have two official scientific names, kind of like how you have a first name and a family name. So the species name for humans is homo sapien. The species name for a common black rat is rattus rattus. An Asian elephant is elephas maximus. Those names sound fancy, and originally the scientific names of animals were in Latin or Greek, but they don't have to be Latin or Greek anymore, they just have to sound like they are! But we don't typically call all animals by their scientific names. We often refer to them by their common names, which are kind of like nicknames! Common names can be different in different languages. Like, the scientific name for a wolf is canus lupus. That would stay the same no matter what language you're using. But in English we tend to call it a wolf; in Spanish you'd call it un lobo, and in Welsh it would be blaidd (pronounced "blythe"). Even within the same language, an animal can have lots of common names. Here in Vermont, where I live, we have an animal called a groundhog. But most people around here call it a woodchuck. And others call it a land beaver, or a whistle pig! Common names were often in use long before animals go their specific scientific names.
28 min
The Slow Home Podcast
The Slow Home Podcast
Brooke McAlary
Meditation, acceptance and relinquishing control with Kevin Janks - Life in the Time of Covid-19
We've all heard about the transformative power of meditation, but how can we access it when uncertainty, stress and living through a pandemic make it difficult to simply sit still and breathe?  In today's episode Brooke is joined by friend of the show and founder of Centred Meditation, Kevin Janks, to talk through the power of meditation in challenging times.  Meditation allows us to decompress from 'fight or flight' mode and as Kevin explains, the time investment doesn’t need to be excessive. (Research has found that meditating for as little as 12 minutes a day can have a substantial impact over the course of three weeks). It can also be used to shift our perception of control, which is often the overriding emotion during times of crisis, and by doing so, release us from the stress of trying to control and uncontrollable situation. Kevin also shares how meditation allows us to accept the current circumstances we find ourselves in (not in order to accept and give up, but in order to simply accept the way things are at the moment) and use that freedom to look at how we will move forward when we're able.  There's so much to be taken from meditation, particularly during such stressful times, and this conversation with Kevin is full of tools and takeaways that will hopefully help you.  Enjoy!  Looking for more Slow? Find show notes, resources and links at slowyourhome.com/season6 Follow us on Instagram @slowhomepod Sign up for the Slow Post, Brooke's weekly slow-living love letters  Or leave a rating or review in iTunes Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/slow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
40 min
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