Bonus Episode 9: The Surgery That Sparked the Iran-Contra Scandal
11 min

Did President Ronald Reagan authorize selling arms to Iran while still recovering from major surgery in 1985?

Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
Ben Franklin's World
Ben Franklin's World
Liz Covart
289 Marcus Nevius, Maroonage in the Great Dismal Swamp
The name “Great Dismal Swamp” doesn’t evoke an image of a pleasant or beautiful place, and yet, it was an important place that offered land speculators the chance to profit and enslaved men and women a chance for freedom in colonial British America and the early United States. Marcus Nevius, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Rhode Island and author of City of Refuge: Slavery and Petit Maroonage in the Great Dismal Swamp, 1763-1856, has offered to guide us into and through the Great Dismal Swamp and its history, so that we can better understand maroons and maroon communities in early America and learn more about how enslaved people used an environment around them to resist their enslaved condition. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/289 Join Ben Franklin's World! * _Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears!_ Programming Note * Episodes in December 2020 will run on December 8 and December 15. BFW will be back with new episodes on January 5, 2021. Sponsor Links * _Omohundro Institute_ * _The Ben Franklin's World Shop_ Complementary Episodes * Episode 133: Patrick Breen, The Nat Turner Rebellion * Episode 176: Daina Ramey Berry, The Value of the Enslaved from Womb to Grave * Episode 226: Ryan Quintana, Making the State of South Carolina * Episode 250: Virginia, 1619 * Episode 263: Sari Altschuler, The Medical Imagination * Episode 282: Vincent Brown, Tacky’s Revolt Listen! * _Apple Podcasts_ * _Spotify_ * _Google Podcasts_ * _Amazon Music_ * _Ben Franklin's World iOS App_ * _Ben Franklin's World Android App_ Helpful Links * _Join the Ben Franklin's World F__acebook Group_ * Ben Franklin’s World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast * _Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page_ * _Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter_
1 hr 3 min
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
The Bowery Boys: New York City History
Bowery Boys Media
The Beatles Invade New York!
PODCAST: EPISODE 346 How Beatlemania both energized and paralyzed New York City in the mid 1960s as told by the women who screamed their hearts out and helped build a phenomenon. Before BTS, before One Direction, before the Backstreet Boys and NSYNC, before Menudo and the Jackson 5 -- you had Paul, John, George and Ringo. The Beatles were already an international phenomenon by February 9, 1964. when they first arrived at JFK Airport. During their visits to the city between 1964 and 1966, the Fab Four were seen by thousands of screaming fans and millions of television audiences in some of New York’s greatest landmarks. And each time they came through here, the city — and America itself — was a little bit different.  In this show, we present a little re-introduction to the Beatles and how New York City became a key component in the Beatlemania phenomenon, a part of their mythology — from the classic concert venues (Shea Stadium, Carnegie Hall) to the luxury hotels (The Plaza, The Warwick). We’ll also be focusing on the post-Beatles career of John Lennon who truly fell in love with New York City in the 1970s. And we'll visit that tragic moment in American history which united the world 40 years ago — on December 8, 1980 But we are not telling this story alone. Helping us tell this story are recollections from listeners, the women who were once the young fans of the Beatles here in New York, the women who helped built Beatlemania. boweryboyshistory.com   Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/boweryboys See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
1 hr 8 min
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect
Radiolab Presents: More Perfect
WNYC Studios
The Most Perfect Album: Episode 9
This season, More Perfect is taking its camera lens off the Supreme Court and zooming in on the words of the people: the 27 amendments that We The People have made to our Constitution. We're taking on these 27 amendments both in song and in story. This episode is best listened to alongside 27: The Most Perfect Album, an entire album (an ALBUM!) and digital experience of original music and art inspired by the 27 Amendments. Think of these episodes as the audio liner notes. In More Perfect's final episode of the season, listen to liner notes for two amendments that contemplate the still-unfinished status of our Constitution. "27" is an album that marks a particular point in our history: this moment when we have 27 Amendments to our Constitution. What will be the 28th? Maybe it will address our nation's capital. The capital has been a bit of a Constitutional anomaly for much of our nation's history — it's at the heart of the democracy, but because it's not a state, people in Washington D.C. have been disenfranchised almost by accident. The 23rd Amendment solved some of the problem — it gave D.C. the right to vote for president. But it left much of D.C.'s representation questions unanswered. D.C. still does not have voting representation in Congress. Instead, D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to Congress. For this liner note, More Perfect profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. The song for the 23rd Amendment is by The Mellow Tones, a group of students from D.C. high school Duke Ellington School of the Arts, along with their teacher Mark G. Meadows. The chorus, "Why won't you count on me?" reflects on the continued disenfranchisement of our nation's capital. The final amendment of the album, the 27th Amendment, put limits on Senators' ability to give themselves a pay raise, and it has arguably the most unusual path to ratification of all 27. The first draft for the amendment was written by none other than James Madison in 1789, but back then, it didn't get enough votes from the states for ratification. It wasn't until a college student named Gregory Watson awakened the dormant amendment centuries later that it was finally ratified. The 27th Amendment song is by Kevin Devine and tells Watson's story.
24 min
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu