CP | What Debate Is For
44 min

In this week’s episode, Justin and Michael offer a reminder about what debate—and politics generally—is for and why it’s important. They also discuss the news related to President Trump’s health, as well as recent actions by Texas’ Governor regarding voting rights.

Quick to Listen
Quick to Listen
Christianity Today
Why We Can’t Stop Talking about Hillsong's Celebrity Pastors
Transcribed highlights of the show can be found in our episode summaries. At the beginning of this month, Hillsong NYC pastor Carl Lentz was fired. A day after the news went public, he posted a picture of his family on Instagram admitting he was unfaithful in his marriage. Both before and after the news, Lentz made headlines across Christian and secular media for his popularity and successful ministry—as well as the “hipster” pastor look he popularized. When Lentz co-founded Hillsong NYC with Joel Houston in 2010, the church drew lines around the block and caught the eye of A-list celebrities, none more famous than Justin Bieber. Lentz, who became famous for his wire-rimmed glasses, plunging V-necks, and designer sneakers, himself became subject of a number of profiles, including this 2015 GQ feature from Taffy Brodesser-Akner: “The music! The lights! The crowds!” begins an incredulous woman narrating a CNN segment on Hillsong NYC . “It looks like a rock concert.” The chyron reads “Hipster preacher smashes stereotypes.” They call Pastor Carl a hipster. Carl says he doesn’t know what that means, and he wears a motorcycle jacket when he says this.Pastor Joel is unwilling to acknowledge that there’s something going on here. Yes, he tells me, sure, he likes clothes. But that’s the end of it. I should ask Pastor Carl about the clothes, he tells me. What Pastor Carl does, he says—that’s intentional, and then he laughs. This week on Quick to Listen, we wanted to discuss the attention around a new generation of fashion-forward pastors. What does it reveal about ministry? But what does our fascination with this aesthetic reveal more broadly about the American and Western church? Anthropologist Katherine Ajibade, formerly a researcher with the British think tank Theos, joins CT’s Morgan Lee and Kate Shellnutt. What is Quick to Listen? Read more Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow our hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Follow Katherine Ajibade on Twitter Music by Sweeps Quick to Listen is produced by Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Bunmi Ishola Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
59 min
As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
How Racial Trauma Works
Jim Davis and Justin Holcomb welcome Sheila Wise Rowe, author and executive director of the Rehoboth House, to discuss racial trauma and the many ways it can present itself cognitively, emotionally, behaviorally, and physically. Rowe describes how Christians should engage others who have experienced racial trauma, in an effort to close the trauma gap and bring healing. The group discusses: * An introduction to Sheila Wise Rowe (1:06) * Defining trauma (1:50) * Causes of trauma (6:21) * Helping those unfamiliar with trauma to understand (8:06) * The effects of trauma (11:19) * Secondary trauma (14:06) * The effects of secondary trauma (15:44) * Defining racial trauma and its effects (19:52) * Microaggression (28:57) * Gaslighting (31:15) * Feeling racial trauma (33:05) * Learning to listen (36:22) * Unknowingly exacerbating racial trauma (42:29) * Empathy (45:44) * Lamenting racial trauma (47:44) * Healing racial trauma (50:20) * Dealing with skeptics (56:10) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race. Discussion Questions: 1. What do you think of when you think of trauma? What are examples of trauma? 2. What is a trauma gap? Why does it exist? Why must the church seek to understand the trauma of others, especially those who have experienced racial trauma? 3. What is vicarious trauma? What are examples of vicarious trauma? How can that play out repeatedly through media and lived experiences? 4. How can we seek to understand and relate to others trauma? What might this look like? How does the gospel speak to trauma and, specifically, racial trauma?
1 hr 2 min
Pass The Mic
Pass The Mic
The Witness
Becoming Brave with Dr. Brenda Salter Mcneil
What a special guest we have on the podcast today! If you are familiar with the conversation about reconciliation and justice in the church, you won’t get very far without hearing the name, the Rev. Dr. Brenda Salter Mcneil.  Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil is a dynamic speaker, author, professor and reconciliation thought leader. Her mission is to inspire, equip and empower the next generation of Christian leaders to be practitioners of reconciliation.   Dr. Brenda is an international trailblazer, leading individuals, communities, and organizations to biblical reconciliation. She was featured as one of the 50 most influential women to watch by Christianity Today in 2012.   She is the author of Roadmap to Reconciliation 2.0, A Credible Witness: Reflections on Power, Evangelism and Race (2008), and The Heart of Racial Justice: How Soul Change Leads to Social Change (2005), coauthored with Rick Richardson. Her newest book Becoming Brave: Finding the Courage to Pursue Racial Justice Now is available August 2020. Becoming Brave offers a distinctly Christian framework for addressing systemic injustice. It challenges Christians to be everyday activists who become brave enough to break the silence and work with others to dismantle systems of injustice and inequality. Looking through the lens of the biblical narrative of Esther, McNeil challenges Christian reconcilers to recognize the particular pain in our world so they can work together to repair what is broken while maintaining a deep hope in God’s ongoing work for justice. This book provides education and prophetic inspiration for every person who wants to take reconciliation seriously.
58 min
Theology in the Raw
Theology in the Raw
Preston Sprinkle
#829 - A Conversation about Race and Evangelicalism: BJ Thompson
BJ and I sat down to have a conversation with no agenda in mind. We start by talking about his work as a life-coach and leader at #BuildaBetterUs, we quickly move into talking about church, church structure, and money. Then, we move into talking about the topic of race in Evangelicalism and we pretty much camped out there for the rest of the time. Some of the things we talked about were: - The reason why black millennials are leaving the Reformed and SBC church - How we should think about Christian "greats" like Jonathan Edwards who owned slaves - What about MLK's misogyny?  - How why evangelicals can truly love and serve their black brothers and sisters BJ is a life coach, speaker, and author who helped launch one of the largest faith movements in recent history – the “116 Movement” with Grammy award winning artist Lecrae. He also served alongside Bryan Loritts to expand groundbreaking racial reconciliation work in Memphis, TN.  BJ has worked with tens of thousands of individuals and couples all over the world helping them experience personal and relational growth. Currently BJ serves as the executive director for Build a Better Us. He has a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of North Texas and a master’s degree in Christian studies from Union University. He has been featured in Relevant Magazine, Propel, Christianity Today, Barna, & other publications. He has also worked with History Chanel, RZIM, ERLC, Desiring God, Universities & other corporations. He and his wife Vanja have been married 16 years and live in Atlanta with their three children. Watch this episode of the podcast on YouTube Connect with Preston Twitter | @PrestonSprinkle Instagram | @preston.sprinkle Youtube | Preston Sprinkle Check out his website prestonsprinkle.com If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review.
OnScript
OnScript
M Lynch, M. Bates, D. Johnson, E. Heim, C. Tilling, A. Hughes
Richard Rice - The Future of Open Theism
Episode: The upstart theological movement called open theism is coming of age. It's time to reassess its possibilities, promises, and perils. One of the founders of open theism, Richard Rice, speaks with co-host Matt Bates about varieties of open theism, vexed models concerning God and time, and his own spiritual journey in the face of the intense controversies surrounding open theism within evangelicalism. The Book: Richard Rice, The Future of Open Theism: From Antecedents to Opportunities (IVP Academic, 2020). Open theism has reached its adolescence. How did it get here? And where does it go from here? Since IVP's publication of The Openness of God in 1994, evangelical theology has grappled with the alternative vision of the doctrine of God that open theism offers. Responding to critics who claim that it proposes a truncated version of God that fails to account for Scripture and denies many of the traditional attributes of God, open theism's proponents contend that its view of God is not only biblically warranted but also more accurate―with a portrayal of God that emphasizes divine love for humanity and responsiveness to human free will. No matter what one's assessment, open theism inarguably has made a significant impact on recent theological discourse. Now, twenty-five years later, Richard Rice recounts in this volume the history of open theism from its antecedents and early developments to its more recent and varied expressions. He then considers different directions that open theism might continue to develop in relation to several primary doctrines of the Christian faith. (Publisher’s description). Guest: Richard Rice received an MDiv degree from Andrews University in 1969, and an MA and PhD in Christian theology from the University of Chicago in 1972 and 1974, respectively. Rice is a Professor of Religion at Loma Linda University in the areas of Theology and Philosophy of Religion. Rice is the sole author numerous books, including God's Foreknowledge and Man’s Free Will; The Reign of God: An Introduction to Christian Theology from a Seventh-day Adventist Perspective; and Search for Meaning: Contemporary Responses to the Problem of Pain. He also co-authored, along with Clark Pinnock, John Sanders, William Hasker, and David Basinger, the book that for practical purposes launched open theism into the mainstream of theological conversation, The Openness of God: A Biblical Challenge to the Traditional Understanding of God. OnScript's Review: All Christians have implicit or explicit models regarding how God engages the world. As classical theologians consider the widest categories—God's relationship to time, providence, and human free will—open theism has proven to be a disruptive but necessary conversation partner. Richard Rice masterfully maps the past and present landscape of open theism while adding his own powerful and creative voice. --Matthew W. Bates, author of The Birth of the Trinity, for OnScript
1 hr 6 min
Be the Bridge Podcast with Latasha Morrison
Be the Bridge Podcast with Latasha Morrison
That Sounds Fun Network
Be The Bridge 213 - Athletes & Activism with Justin Holiday
Description: In the volatile year of 2020 we’ve seen uprisings that have spurred tense feelings and emotions causing Christians to be split on issues related to social justice.  But, this is also a year where athletes have used their platform in ways that are reminiscent of the civil rights era.  Fists in the air are coupled with kneeling during the national anthem and sporting events by sports professionals in every sport from basketball to tennis, NASCAR to Formula racing, and everywhere in between.  Be the Bridge Founder Latasha Morrison was able to have a conversation with a Christian athlete who not only has a heart for rectifying social and economic inequities but has placed himself on the frontlines of the fight for social justice.  His name is Justin Holiday, the shooting guard / small forward for the Indiana Pacers. Quotes: “We didn’t grow up watching the news.  When things happened we knew how to get in the word. We knew how to pray and that’s what we did.” - Justin Holiday “As much as I wanted to be away from the news and not see certain things, one, with social media it’s gonna happen but two I needed to see that, I needed to not keep myself away from that.” - Justin Holiday “I don’t have my children on social media. I wanna protect my children from nasty comments” - Justin Holiday “Don’t make yourself less worthy than you should be.  You’re a child of God.” - Justin Holiday LISTEN & SUBSCRIBE Podcast link: https://podlink.to/BeTheBridgeSocial handles/links: Instagram: @LatashaMorrisonTwitter: @LatashaMorrisonFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/LatashaMMorrison/Official Hashtag: #bethebridge --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app
53 min
The Daily Liturgy Podcast
The Daily Liturgy Podcast
Coram Deo Church Community
November 25, 2020
Scripture: Proverbs 12, Luke 23:33-43, Psalm 95 Writers: Mike Kresnik, Bob Thune, Darby Whealy, Tyler Anderson Narrators: Charlotte Bertrand, Gary Nebeker, Bob Thune, Darby Whealy, Kevin Huddleston Music: Dan Phelps and William Ryan Fitch Production: Mike Kresnik, Bethany Gilbert Sources: The Worship Sourcebook; The Valley of Vision; The Book of Common Prayer; + original contributions by the authors. OPENING PRAYER To you, O Lord, I lift up my soul. O my God, in you I trust; let me not be put to shame; let not my enemies exult over me. Make me to know your ways, O Lord; teach me your paths. Lead me in your truth and teach me, for you are the God of my salvation; for you I wait all the day long. CONFESSION OF SIN & PRAYER FOR GRACE Eternal God, my fear and unbelief run deep. While I may outwardly confess your salvation, inwardly I deny the power of your Gospel. I work to keep up appearances, but I neglect the weightier matters of the law: justice, mercy and faithfulness. Yet according to your steadfast love, you have forgiven me through the precious blood of Jesus Christ. Direct my path, Lord, that I may walk in repentance and humility before you and others. Amen                 OT READING: Proverbs 12 THE LORD’S PRAYER NT READING: Luke 23:33-43 PRAYER OF ADORATION: Jesus Christ, Lamb of God: I adore you for the beauty and power of your sacrifice. In humility you received our judgment, our sin, and our scorn. Remembering your great mercy, I worship you as my Lord, my God, and my King. And I say with the thief: remember me when you come into your kingdom. PSALM READING: Psalm 95 PRAYER OF CONSECRATION O Lord, this Psalm puts before me both an invitation and a warning. It shows me two scenes from my spiritual family history: first, Israel united in joyful worship, fully alive to the goodness of God; and then, the generation who hardened their hearts in the wilderness. These remembrances lay out two possible paths for my soul. So help me respond with wisdom and teachability. I want to hear your voice today, and not harden my heart. I want to come into your presence with thanksgiving and with joyful praise. So in my heart right now, I bow down; I kneel before the Lord, my Maker. I affirm that I’m yours, a sheep of your pasture, dependent on your direction to keep me safe and secure. Keep me from going astray in my heart; align my inner being according to your ways. Amen.  BENEDICTION And now may the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship and communion of the Holy Spirit abide and remain with us, now and throughout our time on earth, until the day of His return: Amen.
12 min
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