A special announcement from TED on climate
Play • 1 hr 7 min

Today, we're re-sharing a conversation with Christiana Figueres, because we've got a special update for you from TED. On Saturday, October 10, we'll launch Countdown: an exciting new global initiative to champion and accelerate solutions to the climate crisis, turning ideas into action. To get involved, tune in to the global launch which will be live-streamed at youtube.com/ted on October 10 at 11am ET.

In 2015, Christiana Figueres brokered the historic Paris Agreement to combat climate change. She gives an inside look at the negotiations that led to a commitment from 195 countries to work toward a low carbon future and discusses her current work on COUNTDOWN, an ambitious new initiative from TED aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net-zero.

When in Spain
When in Spain
Paul Burge
How to buy property in Spain
Planning to buy a property in Spain? Maybe it's a future ambition to own your dream Spanish home. Whatever the case, this episode will give you a detailed insight into buying a house or apartment in Spain and is packed with practical advice on buying in Spain. It's a meaty subject so I decided to enlist Spanish property consultant Felix Joseph who shares his expert advice. Felix runs his own property consultancy on the Costa del Sol called Property Under One Roof. He's also written a book called How to Buy a Property in Spain: everything they wont tell you about buying a property in Spain. Felix first caught the property bug at a young age when his father unfurled the plans for a house he was going to buy in his native Caribbean. Felix studied an economics degree and then worked in IT for 15 years before investing in property in the UK and building up his own property portfolio which allowed him to semi-retire to Spain with his family. In 2002 he left IT to set up his real estate company ‘Property Under One Roof’ and then moved to Spain in 2006 and pivoted into property consultancy where he offers a wholistic service for people from outside Spain looking to buy. In the this episode we look at: The paperwork you need to get in order in order to be ready to buy property in Spain, such as a fiscal ID number (NIE)  Whether now is a good time to buy property in Spain or not in light of the situation with Covid 19 and for British citizens, Brexit.  The costs associated with buying property in Spain. The property purchasing process in Spain and legal issues involved.  Mortgages and financing options for buying property in Spain.  The Golden Visa How to find a property in Spain Taxes Sage advice and what pitfalls to watch out for when buying property in Spain. Plus a few questions that When in Spain listeners sent in. For more information about Felix Jospeh and his property consultancy check out his website and social media below: Website: http://howtobuyapropertyinspain.com/ His book available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/-/es/Felix-Joseph-ebook/dp/B087QST5M9 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/YOURPUOR
1 hr 4 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
102. Psychology is overrated
I endeavour to understand and explain the field of education through many disciplines, including neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, economics, and evolutionary biology. Over the course of this podcast's history, I have changed in my reading habits and focus across these disciplines, and in my attitude as to how useful they can be, and where they are best applied. Psychology stands out as a case in point. At first, I thought that psychology would hold all the secrets to knowing how to improve education, by revealing what motivates people, how they think, and how they learn, and showing behavioural "laws" or tendencies that explain the framework from which we should approach understanding ourselves and others. Since then, I have realised that the psychological subfield of cognitive science has profound implications for learning, but the rest of psychology has been a disappointment. Firstly, it suffers from sampling bias. Almost all those who have been tested in psychological experiments are Western university undergraduates. This introduces a cultural bias to the data, and so rather than explaining universal features of humanity (as it supposes), it actually uncovers peculiarities of Western culture. This is dramatically less useful than what I had hoped for, and is no foundation on which to build an understanding of humanity as a whole. Secondly, it has frequent replication issues. There are numerous studies which become famous and frequently cited, only to be shown down the line not to replicate, invalidating their apparently tremendous insight. One high-profile example of this is mindset research, popularised by Carol Dweck, which I mistakenly lauded again and again on this podcast, only to find out down the line that replication studies have shown it not to be such a big deal. In place of psychology, I argue that anthropology and economics are powerful fields that can bring a lot to the table. Anthropology is like psychology but with proper sampling, and economics is like psychology but with much simplified models, which are flawed but also more powerful than many people realise (myself included, until recently). Bringing these two fields in essentially says that culture matters, and we can only understand human universals by looking cross-culturally; that we "fish in water", blind to the forces that shape us all, and we can only see these with outsider's spectacles; that value is a fundamental thing that everyone seeks, and that needs elucidating; and that people more often than not behave in a way that is in line with their own desires. In the episode, I discuss all these, plus also a range of other disciplines that have appeared or will appear on the podcast. Enjoy the episode.
46 min
Working Scientist
Working Scientist
Nature Careers
The postdoc career journeys that date back to kindergarten
Many postdoctoral researchers can trace their career journey back to childhood experiences. In Pearl Ryder’s case it was spending lots of time outdoors in the rural area where she grew up, combined with the experience of having a sibling who experienced poor health. Ryder, a postdoctoral fellow at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in Boston, Massachusetts, and founder of the Future PI Slack group, says: “It made me realize how important health is, and that there’s so little that we understand about the world.” But is science, like some other professions a calling? Yes, says Christopher Hayter, who specializes in entrepreneurship, technology policy, higher education and science at Arizona State University in Phoenix. “There are professions that are a little bit different from your day-to-day job, something people gravitate towards, something bigger than themselves,” he says. “It is often referred to as a calling. I think we could say that about a lot of scientists. It’s how they define themselves: ‘I’m a scientist.’ ‘I’m going to cure cancer.’ ‘I’m going to discover the next planet.’ When students transition from doctoral students to postdoc they are really doubling down on that identity.” Michael Moore, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Davis, adds: “Being a scientist is overcoming a series of hurdles, and you need to see yourself as a scientist to get that internal motivation to keep going. You have to publish so much, get so many grants, teach so many courses. Having that identity and that motivation is really key to moving forward.” Gould’s guests discuss how to maintain that motivation despite the setbacks, and how a scientist’s professional identity and career path is underpinned by the networks, mentors and transferable skills acquired during a postdoc.   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
24 min
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala
TED
A Black Utopia In North Carolina
“I thought I'd come to paradise,” said Jane Ball Groom upon arriving in Soul City, North Carolina. It wasn’t amenities or location that made Soul City paradise, but the promise of what it could be: a city built by Black people, for Black people. Our guests take us back to 1969 when the city was founded and built from (below) the ground up — and while the city itself was short-lived, we’ll see how the seeds it sowed laid roots for spaces that celebrate and center Black culture today. That's a wrap on the season! Share you stand out moments with host Saleem Reshamwala on Twitter (@Kidethic). For photos from the episode and more on the history of Soul City, head to the Souvenir Book of Soul City in the North Carolina digital collections. Special thanks to Shirlette Ammons who we could not do this story without, and our guests Charmaine McKissick-Melton, Jane Ball-Groom, Lianndra Davis, Lou Myers, Tobias Rose, and Derrick Beasley. Extra special thank you to Alan Thompson, who recorded the saxophone music you heard in this episode from Parish Street on Durham’s Black Wall Street. Our unsung hero for this week is Sammy Case who manages the cross-promotions for all of TED's podcasts - if you found Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala from one of your other favorite shows, she’s the reason why! Far Flung with Saleem Reshamwala is produced by Jesse Baker and Eric Nuzum of Magnificent Noise for TED. Our host is Saleem Reshamwala. Our production staff includes Hiwote Getaneh, Sabrina Farhi, Kim Nederveen Pieterse, Elyse Blennerhassett, Angela Cheng, and Michelle Quint, with the guidance of Roxanne Hai Lash and Colin Helms. Our fact-checker is Abbey White. This episode was mixed and sound designed by Kristin Mueller. We're doing a survey! If you have a minute, please take it at surveynerds.com/farflung. It really helps make the show better.
57 min
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