Seth Godin
Play • 1 hr 14 min
Design Better Podcast
Design Better Podcast
InVisionApp, Inc
Logitech's Jason Mayden: Leading with curiosity and humility
As we head into a new year—and leave behind a year that was challenging for just about everyone on the planet, with the hope that this year will be better for all—we wanted to share an interview with one of the most optimistic, creative, and insightful people we know: designer, entrepreneur, and educator Jason Mayden. When we first interviewed Jason in 2018 for one of our Design Better Conversations, we knew we had to get him on the podcast. He had such a unique perspective on design as a service to humanity that we sensed our audience would love to hear his story. We spoke with Jason on a wide range of topics, from how a near-death experience in childhood shaped his career and life, to how he maintains his energy and focus, to why being a polymath is an enormous advantage in today’s job market. We finish the interview on a topic that strays a little from our usual subjects but is ultimately more important: how through all of our individual struggles we can benefit from recognizing our shared humanity. Takeaways: * Learn what drove Jason to create his company SuperHeroic, and what he took away from the process. * Hear how servant leadership shapes his work and creativity. * Understand how Jason designs his life using tools like creative direction and brand strategy, Bio In his previous role at Nike, Jason oversaw the design and execution of all conceptual products, data-driven innovations, and inline lifestyle and performance product for Jordan Brand, as the Senior Global Design Director. During his 13+ year career at Nike, Mayden led and contributed to the creation of innovative sport performance products for athletes and cultural icons such as Carmelo Anthony, Chris Paul, Russell Westbrook, Derek Jeter, and Michael Jordan. In 2011, Mayden successfully received his Master’s in General Management and Social Innovation from Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and shortly thereafter he returned to Nike as the Global Director of Innovation for Nike's Digital Sport division where he was responsible for the strategic investigation of new technologies and services, such as the Nike Fuel Band and the Nike+ platform. Currently, Jason is an advisor, d.Fellow and Media Designer at the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford University, a frequent lecturer at Stanford University’s prestigious Graduate School of Business, and an advisory board member to his undergraduate alma mater, the College for Creative Studies.
44 min
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Behavioral Grooves Podcast
Kurt Nelson, PhD and Tim Houlihan
The Counterintuitive Persuasion of The Catalyst with Jonah Berger
Jonah Berger is a marketing professor in the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and the internationally best-selling author Contagious and Invisible Influence. He consults with some of the largest corporations in the world and derives great insights from his interactions with business leaders wrestling with strategic issues. In this episode, we caught up with Jonah to discuss his most recent book called The Catalyst. His book takes a counter-intuitive view on persuasion by focusing on reducing barriers to change rather than learning just the right lines, information, or coercive measures to use. Jonah advocates for first understanding why people are doing what they’re doing before we try to get them to do something else. He shared his REDUCE model with us - Reactance, Endowment, Distance, Uncertainty, and Corroborating Evidence – and we dove into Reactance as a major component of how we resist change. The harder you push on someone to change, the more likely they are to push back. It’s natural for us to push back and to illustrate, just try this little experiment with someone in your household (another adult). Ask your adult counterpart to hold up their hand at shoulder level and have your palms meet. Tell them you’re going to push on their hand, then do it with some force. Do they push back to slow the advance of your hand or do they just go limp and let you push their hand as far as you can? It’s likely that they’ll push back. The same is true of any behavior change. And that’s okay. Our natural tendencies serve us well in many situations, but not all. Jonah’s perspective on how catalysts change behavior will open your mind to new ideas. We hope you enjoy it and, this week, find your groove. © 2021 Behavioral Grooves Links Jonah Berger, PhD: https://jonahberger.com/author-bio/ Jonah Berger Additional Resources: https://jonahberger.com/resources/ Lee Ross, PhD: https://profiles.stanford.edu/lee-ross Mark Lepper, PhD: https://psychology.stanford.edu/people/mark-lepper Kurt Lewin, PhD “Force Field Analysis”: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Lewin Musical Links Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ardglr9MVVQ Queen “We Will Rock You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvKkIttJLcc Tim Houlihan “Thinking About You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xS-PsjRktUk Dolly Parton “I Will Always Love You”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0bEZH6ZqG4
48 min
Education Bookcast
Education Bookcast
Stanislaw Pstrokonski
102. Psychology is overrated
I endeavour to understand and explain the field of education through many disciplines, including neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, anthropology, economics, and evolutionary biology. Over the course of this podcast's history, I have changed in my reading habits and focus across these disciplines, and in my attitude as to how useful they can be, and where they are best applied. Psychology stands out as a case in point. At first, I thought that psychology would hold all the secrets to knowing how to improve education, by revealing what motivates people, how they think, and how they learn, and showing behavioural "laws" or tendencies that explain the framework from which we should approach understanding ourselves and others. Since then, I have realised that the psychological subfield of cognitive science has profound implications for learning, but the rest of psychology has been a disappointment. Firstly, it suffers from sampling bias. Almost all those who have been tested in psychological experiments are Western university undergraduates. This introduces a cultural bias to the data, and so rather than explaining universal features of humanity (as it supposes), it actually uncovers peculiarities of Western culture. This is dramatically less useful than what I had hoped for, and is no foundation on which to build an understanding of humanity as a whole. Secondly, it has frequent replication issues. There are numerous studies which become famous and frequently cited, only to be shown down the line not to replicate, invalidating their apparently tremendous insight. One high-profile example of this is mindset research, popularised by Carol Dweck, which I mistakenly lauded again and again on this podcast, only to find out down the line that replication studies have shown it not to be such a big deal. In place of psychology, I argue that anthropology and economics are powerful fields that can bring a lot to the table. Anthropology is like psychology but with proper sampling, and economics is like psychology but with much simplified models, which are flawed but also more powerful than many people realise (myself included, until recently). Bringing these two fields in essentially says that culture matters, and we can only understand human universals by looking cross-culturally; that we "fish in water", blind to the forces that shape us all, and we can only see these with outsider's spectacles; that value is a fundamental thing that everyone seeks, and that needs elucidating; and that people more often than not behave in a way that is in line with their own desires. In the episode, I discuss all these, plus also a range of other disciplines that have appeared or will appear on the podcast. Enjoy the episode.
46 min
Creative Pep Talk
Creative Pep Talk
Andy J. Pizza
303 - Afraid Your Creativity is Stunted? Maybe The Answer Isn't In The Work with Cymone Wilder
Listen & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/creative-pep-talk/id929743897 Cymone Wilder http://www.simonandmoose.com/ https://www.instagram.com/simonandmoose Cymone’s Deep Fried Lettering Youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwsLDPivUrc ........................................................................................... SPONSORS ........................................................................................... SKILLSHARE X CREATIVE PEP TALK Our first ever online video course is out now on SKILLSHARE! Are you looking for your next big break? Whether you’ve NEVER had a big break in your creative career OR you’re a veteran creative who needs a new big break to reinvent yourself: this class is for you!!! Go to skillshare.com/creativepep to get started!!! SHILLINGTON Study 9 months part-time Graphic Design Boot Camp from anywhere. With Shillington’s online graphic design course, you’ll graduate with a solid understanding of creative problem solving, design theory and software. Create an incredible design portfolio and master how to discuss and sell your work—essential skills for any creative career. LEARN MORE: https://shillo.online/creativepeptalk Baron Fig Tools for Thinkers! For every Confidant sketchbook sold Baron Fig plants a tree! Get 20% off their Idea Toolset (sketchbook + pen + pencase) at baronfig.com by tuning in for your promo code! Jakprints Check out our merch at creativepeptalk.etsy.com - most of which is printed by our wonderful print partner Jakprints.com
57 min
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Art Juice: A podcast for artists, creatives and art lovers
Louise Fletcher/Alice Sheridan
How to Sell Art Online [104]
This week, we answer a listener question from Maxine, who asked about the best ways to sell art online. This is a huge topic and perhaps a little ambitious for a one-hour episode, but we decided to give it our best shot! In a wide-ranging discussion, we discuss the importance of a website and email list as a "home base" for your marketing, so that no matter where people find you, they can sign up to stay in touch. But we also cover other options and ways to get started if you don't yet have a website, including social media, licensing opportunities and third party websites such as Saatchi Art.  And we stress that even when you do have a website, it's not enough to just set it up and then wait for people to arrive. You will always need to drive traffic to your site and finding ways to do this is an important element of your marketing strategy. Mentioned Louise's Art Tribe membership group is currently accepting new members. Join for a free trial month at: https://thispaintinglife.mykajabi.com/art-tribe Find us and sign up for our newsletters at: www.alicesheridan.com www.louisefletcherart.com Submit a question at bit.ly/artjuicepodcast Support the podcast with a small donation at: https://ko-fi.com/artjuice Follow us on Instagram: Alice @alicesheridanstudio Louise @louisefletcher_art Credits "Monkeys Spinning Monkeys" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
58 min
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