155: Is it Referred Pain or Radiating pain? Know the Difference.
13 min

In episode 155:Is it Referred Pain or Radiating pain? Know the Difference I review what makes each type of pain different, causes of each, I give some examples and much more!

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#ReferredPain #OrthoEvalPal #OrthopedicEvaluations #RadiatingPain


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The Undifferentiated Medical Student
The Undifferentiated Medical Student
Ian Drummond
Ep 072 - PICU (and Entrepreneurship) with Dr. Arup Roy-Burman
This is another exciting conversation with a physician who is following a non-traditional career path! Dr. Arup Roy-Burman Dr. Roy-Burman is a pediatric intensivist (aka pediatric critical care specialist) and former Medical Director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. Dr. Roy-Burman is now the CEO of Elemeno Health, which he cofounded in 2016. Dr. Roy-Burman completed his undergraduate degree at UC Berkley in 1989; completed his medical degree at UCSF in 1994; completed his residency in pediatrics at Stanford in 1997; and then returned to UCSF for a fellowship in pediatrics critical care (aka PICU fellowship), which he completed in 2000. After his fellowship, Dr. Roy-Burman took his first attending job at the Children's Hospital of Oakland eventually crossing the Bay to fill the role of Medical Director of the PICU at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in 2011, where he was also the Director of Transport, Access and Outreach. In this dual role of Medical Director of the PICU and Director of Transport, Access, and Outreach allowed Dr. Roy-Burman to interact with large swaths of the healthcare system from inpatient to outpatient and with all sub-specialities who consult in the PICU. With this experience of the inter-workings of the hospital system combined with his clinical understanding of patient care and provider pain points, he decided to co-found Elemeno Health, which received backing from famed accelerator and venture capital firm, Y Combinator. At a high-level, Elemeno Health is a SAAS (software as a service) company whose software aims to help push best-practices to front-line providers as well as capture feedback from these front-liners, thereby closing the "knowledge-practice gap." ***Medical students, residents and all interested parties:*** If interested in joining the Elemeno Health team, Dr. Roy-Burman would love to hear from you at info@elemenohealth.com! Please enjoy with Dr. Roy-Burman! P.S. We recorded this one in Dr. Roy-Burman's car on his drive from an investor meeting in Palo Alto back to his startup digs in Oakland, which makes for an interesting listen! Try to get through the first 5 minutes--the audio gets much better.
2 hr 6 min
The Rx Bricks Podcast
The Rx Bricks Podcast
USMLE-Rx
Anatomy of the Heart
The heart is a muscular organ about the size of a fist. It pumps blood throughout the body, commanding a vast vascular network to deliver oxygen to every cell in the body. It beats nonstop for as long as we are alive, at an average of 80/min. So by the time we are 80 years old, our hearts will have beaten more than 3 billion times! The heart’s position in the center of our chest mimics the organ’s central position as the source of human love, spirituality, courage, and resistance. It is an amazingly beautiful organ; let’s learn more about its anatomy. After listening to this AudioBrick, you should be able to: * Describe the pericardial sac and its layers, the pericardial space, and the pericardial fluid. * Identify the three layers of the heart. * Identify the four heart chambers, describe their topography, and explain their functions during systole and diastole. * Describe the systemic and pulmonary vessels that enter and exit the heart, including their origin and destination, and the oxygenation status of the blood being transported. * Explain the basic functional anatomy of the atrioventricular (AV) and semilunar valves, and explain how they operate during systole and diastole to create the four heart sounds (S1, S2, S3, and S4). * Describe the role of papillary muscles and chordae tendineae. You can also check out the original Anatomy of the Heart brick from our Cardiovascular collection, which is available for free. Learn more about Rx Bricks by signing up for a free USMLE-Rx account: www.usmle-rx.com You will get 5 days of full access to our Rx360+ program, including nearly 800 Rx Bricks. After the 5-day period, you will still be able to access over 150 free bricks, including the entire collections for General Microbiology and Cellular and Molecular Biology. *** If you enjoyed this episode, we’d love for you to leave a review on Apple Podcasts. It helps with our visibility, and the more med students (or future med students) listen to the podcast, the more we can provide to the future physicians of the world. Follow USMLE-Rx at: Facebook: www.facebook.com/usmlerx Blog: www.firstaidteam.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/firstaidteam Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/firstaidteam/ YouTube: www.youtube.com/USMLERX Learn how you can access over 150 of our bricks for FREE: https://www.usmle-rx.com/free-bricks/
20 min
Emergency Medical Minute
Emergency Medical Minute
Emergency Medical Minute
Podcast 618: Treating Opiate Side Effects
Contributor: Don Stader, MD Educational Pearls: * Majority of patients experience side effects while taking opioids * Most common include nausea/vomiting, puriitis, constipation; more severe and less common include respiratory depression, addiction and overdose * Opiates can cause nausea, but ondansetron (Zofran) is the wrong treatment because it’s not antidopaminergic. Instead consider using metoclopramide (Reglan), olanzapine (Zyprexa), or haloperidol (Haldol) * Itching from opiates isn’t histamine mediated so hydroxyzine (Atarax) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) aren’t effective - oddly ondansetron may help with itching. * Constipation is best treated with promotility agents like Senna, rather than stool softeners References Rogers E, Mehta S, Shengelia R, Reid MC. Four Strategies for Managing Opioid-Induced Side Effects in Older Adults. Clin Geriatr. 2013 Apr;21(4): PMID: 25949094; PMCID: PMC4418642. Farmer AD, Holt CB, Downes TJ, Ruggeri E, Del Vecchio S, De Giorgio R. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of opioid-induced constipation. Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Mar;3(3):203-212. doi: 10.1016/S2468-1253(18)30008-6. PMID: 29870734. Summarized by Jackson Roos, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account.
4 min
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