Ep. 50: Habit Tune-Up: Artificial Overload, Deep Retirement, and Motivational Crises
Play • 39 min

In this mini-episode, I answer audio questions from listeners asking for advice about how best to tune-up their productivity and work habits in a moment of increased distraction and disruption.

You can submit your own audio questions at speakpipe.com/calnewport.

Here are the topics we cover:

 * When deep work creates more shallow obligations. [2:49]
 * Avoiding artificial overload. [10:00]
 * Deep retirement. [23:06]
 * Defusing deep procrastination. [27:00]

Thanks to listener Jay Kerstens for the intro music.

Coaching for Leaders
Coaching for Leaders
Dave Stachowiak
509: Transitioning to Remote Leadership, with Tammy Bjelland
Tammy Bjelland: Workplaceless Tammy Bjelland is the Founder and CEO of Workplaceless, a training company that teaches remote workers, leaders, and companies how to work, lead, grow, and thrive in distributed environments. Workplaceless is a fully distributed company supporting enterprise, remote, and government clients such as Toyota, GitLab, and the US Department of Commerce. In this conversation, Tammy and I discuss how leaders can successful establish a mindset that helps them lead remote teams more successfully. We discuss how to take on a placeless mindset, explore the importance of shifting from how to why, and the best starting points for a communication charter. Key Points Five key principles of a Placeless mindset: Embrace location independence over physical presence. Empower autonomous work with flexible schedules. Impact productivity with asynchronous communication and collaboration. Be open and transparent. Trust your colleague and employees. Fear of losing control tends to keep organizations from being able to make useful shifts in mindset. Leaders and organizations that move beyond the “how” of remote work and focus first on the “why” will have more sustainable success. Beware of simply trying to replicate what happened in the office. The whole point of remote work is that it is not like the office. Establish a communication charter. This makes it clear what tools are best — and also how to intervene when things don’t work as anticipated. Resources Mentioned Placeless Mindset by Workplaceless Goplaceless by Workplaceless Related Episodes Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) How to Balance Care and Accountability When Leading Remotely, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 464) How to Lead a Remote Team, with Susan Gerke (episode 465) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
36 min
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
Melina Palmer
135. Using Behavioral Science in Healthcare, Interview with Aline Holzwarth
In today’s episode, I am so excited to introduce you to Aline Holzwarth. Talk about an amazing person doing fantastic and exciting things! Aline is both a principal at the Center for Advanced Hindsight, where she works directly with Dan Ariely and the whole awesome team there. She is ALSO the head of behavioral science at Pattern Health. Today you will get to learn about both of her roles, a little of what it’s like to work with Dan, and about so many great things that she is doing to apply behavioral science in business. I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Show Notes: * [00:08] I’m excited to introduce you to Aline Holzwarth, principal at the Center for Advanced Hindsight and head of behavioral science at Pattern Health. * [03:05] Aline shares about all the exciting things she is doing and how she got into behavioral science. She enjoys being exposed to new and different business applications and she was drawn in by the real-world impact. * [05:32] She loves both of her roles so much that she just can’t give either of them up. * [07:21] She shares about some of her favorite projects she has worked on. * [10:23] At the Center for Advanced Hindsight many of their projects come from Dan and some are chosen by the team. * [12:48] The more you are exposed to, the more connections you are going to make. * [13:28] Pattern Health is a digital health platform that works with researchers and clinicians to help them do their research and translate that research into clinical use cases. * [15:03] Aline’s job is to bake behavioral science into the Pattern Health platform to make behaviors that are not fun at all a little easier to do. * [17:24] There is going to be attrition no matter how good your app is, but ideally they try to limit it. * [20:21] Creating a Care Circle to offer constant support has been very impactful especially in long-term situations. * [23:31] They share ways to put people together for more successful support. * [24:10] There is a lot of benefit in support groups, but getting people to find one and show up is very difficult. * [26:44] You can nudge people in the direction that will be most helpful to them but also allow them to have the freedom of choice. * [28:15] Virgil is their mascot and virtual pet at Pattern Health. Virgil is one way to track daily progress. People get very attached to Virgil. * [30:48] Melina shares about the app, Forest, that holds you accountable. * [31:41] Virgil is based on the ideas of rewards substitution. They are substituting the long term reward for a short term reward. The long term things usually don’t motivate us. * [34:09] Behavioral interventions like Virgil help you overcome tiny hurdles until it becomes habitual. We often have to combine behavior interventions to make each one more effective. * [36:01] Aline shares what the future holds for her. She is really interested in getting more into the idea of personality matching. * [37:23] One area she is really excited to start developing is personalizing to peoples’ personalities. * [40:01] They are using the Big 5 personality model. * [42:10] In behavioral economics we are looking at things that all people do on a more general scale. Using personality, we may be able to drill down and know which behavioral interventions work best based on personality type. * [43:19] Aline is doing an interview series for Pattern Health looking at innovators, health, and research. * [43:54] Melina’s closing reflections. Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show. Let’s connect: * Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com * The Brainy Business® on Facebook * The Brainy Business on Twitter * The Brainy Business on Instagram * The Brainy Business on LinkedIn * Melina on LinkedIn * The Brainy Business on Youtube More from The Brainy Business: * Master Your Mindset Mini-Course * BE Thoughtful Revolution - use code BRAINY to save 10% * Get Your FREE ebook * Melina’s John Mayer Pandora Station! Listen to what she listens to while working. Past Episodes and Other Important Links: * Center for Advanced Hindsight * Center for Advanced Hindsight on Twitter * Aline on Twitter * Aline on LinkedIn * 2020 In Review: Behavioral Science Edition * Aline’s Work * A Beginner's Guide to Irrational Behavior (Coursera) * Pattern Health * Dan Ariely Interview * Julie O’Brien Interview * Bec Weeks Interview * Planning Fallacy * Precommitment * Time Discounting * NUDGES & Choice Architecture * Expect Error * Loss Aversion * Social Proof * Relativity * Interview with Richard Chataway Check out (and preorder!) my upcoming book on Amazon, Bookshop, and Barnes & Noble If you are outside the US, please complete this form to be first to know when the book is available near you AND to help show there is a presence in your country to speed along international agreements and get it to you faster!
46 min
How to Be Awesome at Your Job
How to Be Awesome at Your Job
Pete Mockaitis
634: How to Get Ahead in Your Career by Developing Your Professional Value with Don Miller
Don Miller shares how to advance your career even without the need for a fancy title or degree.  — YOU’LL LEARN —  1) The critical skills an MBA doesn’t teach you  2) The harsh truth every professional must accept to succeed  3) How to craft a compelling business case  Subscribe or visit AwesomeAtYourJob.com/ep634 for clickable versions of the links below.  — ABOUT DON —  Donald Miller is the CEO of Business Made Simple (BusinessMadeSimple.com), an online platform that teaches business professionals everything they need to know to grow a business and enhance their personal value on the open market. He is the host of the Business Made Simple Podcast and is the author of several books including the bestseller Building a StoryBrand. He lives and works in Nashville, Tennessee with his wife Elizabeth.  • Don’s book: Business Made Simple: 60 Days to Master Leadership, Sales, Marketing, Execution and More. Email your Amazon receipts to book@businessmadesimple.com to receive a free mini-course!  • Don’s website: BusinessMadeSimple.com  • Don’s planner: HeroOnAMission.com  — RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE SHOW —  • Book: Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck  • Book: Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl  • Book: The Seven Basic Plots: Why We Tell Stories by Christopher Booker  — THANK YOU SPONSORS! —  • Four Sigmatic. Enhance your productivity and your coffee at foursigmatic.com/howtobeawesome. • NordVPN. Get a nice discount and a free month with your 2-year plan at NordVPN.com/awesomeatyourjob with the code AWESOMEATYOURJOB
47 min
The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
Jacob Morgan
How the CEO of CPChem Leads with Trust, Transparency, and Simplicity
Mark Lashier is the CEO of CPChem, a company that produces petrochemicals and plastics with 5,000 employees around the world. 50% of the company is owned by Chevron and 50% is owned by Phillips Petroleum. Mark has served in leadership roles at Chevron Phillips Chemical and Phillips Petroleum for three decades. With the challenges that we have all had to face over this past year, we have seen organizations and leaders make changes to adapt to our new way of work and life. Mark Lashier, CEO of CPChem, says that all of the events of 2020 reinforced some of the basic principles he has always believed in. Ever since Mark first became CEO in 2017 he has focused on trust, transparency, and simplicity. And while those values are important at any point in time, they were even more crucial throughout 2020. In order to carry on with business Mark knew that his employees and his customers had to trust him and each other, he knew he had to be open and transparent with everyone to keep them up to date, and he had to remove red tape and bureaucracy so people could do their jobs. Bringing trust, transparency, and simplicity to life Any company can have great values or mission statements in place, but if they aren’t brought to life inside of the company the words don’t matter. Mark shares how trust, transparency, and simplicity live and breath inside of CPChem. He says that first of all it is important that all leaders inside of CPChem demonstrate these behaviors. So these become guidelines for hiring and promoting people to leadership positions. The other crucial component of bringing these values to life is giving employees permission to hold the leaders accountable for these behaviors. Mark says, “When you've got employees that maybe in the past were afraid to speak up for whatever reason, now they're not afraid to hold top leadership accountable for the things that we're saying. And I think that's an incredibly beautiful thing. And that is just self reinforcing. It makes us so much more effective in getting out messaging, we're trying to continue to move our culture to a better and better place.” The most important lesson Mark has learned from others Over the years Mark has received a lot of advice from leaders around him. Some of the key advice he has been given has been around leading with integrity and doing what you say you’re going to do. Also it has been around humility and leading in a way that puts the interests of others above your own. Mark shares that the most important lesson he has learned from others is “The more you advance in your career, the less it's about what you do. And it's more about what other people do, what you can help them do and the barriers you can remove to help them be successful and engaged.” The shift we are seeing in the CEO role In the past the way we viewed CEOs was almost as a celebrity--someone who is unapproachable, who sits up in an ivory tower and makes decisions. They usually spent most of their time traveling or in their office, so most employees didn’t see their CEO face to face even after working for the company for years. Now we are seeing a move away from this type of CEO and we are seeing CEOs spending a lot more time in front of employees, they are more approachable, some have open door policies, they are open and transparent about their lives and struggles. So why is this change happening? Mark believes it is largely due to technology and communication. He says there is so much more opportunity these days for CEOs to be visible than in the past. It is now possible for CEOs to create short videos to share with employees or to write monthly newsletters or to do virtual town hall meetings. That wasn’t possible in the past. As Mark shares, “there just was a lot more bureaucracy around in leadership in those days. And so it could behave more like a cult of personality, than anything else. And it just created an atmosphere where I think CEOs were more revered than respected. And they just didn't have the ability to reach out through all of that all those layers of protection to connect with people. And I don't think I would have thrived as a CEO, or perhaps even had the opportunity to be a CEO in that environment. But I certainly enjoy this environment much more.” The importance of leaders thinking beyond dollars and cents There used to be a mentality that the main purpose of a business and all of the leaders in it was to make as much money as possible. But now there is a realization that it’s not just about making a profit, it’s about positively impacting employees, customers, and communities. Mark says, “We like to think about ourselves as being sustainably profitable and sustainably growing. And there's a lot of dimensions to that you can't be sustainably profitable, or sustainably grow if you're in a community and you're abusing that community, either environmentally or through bad employment practices. Or if you're not taking care of employees providing a great work environment or career opportunities, they're going to go elsewhere, which will impair your ability to be sustainably profitable over time.” Yes, as an organization you have to be profitable, that is important. But if you want to be sustainably profitable, as Mark talks about, you have to make sure that you are not only taking care of your employees and customers, but also the community around you, the environment, and the world as a whole. Organizations have a huge responsibility and they can change the world, if they want to. “If we're not providing solutions for humanity, we're not going to be sustainably profitable, or grow sustainably over a long period of time.” This episode is brought to you by my friends at ServiceNow, a software company that makes the world of work, work better for people by delivering digital workflows that create great employee experiences, and unlock productivity. If you or your company is looking to transform old, manual ways of working into digital workflows, then you need ServiceNow. They are trusted by over 6,200 enterprises customers, Check them out here.
1 hr 4 min
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