The Crazy One
The Crazy One
Oct 25, 2020
Ep 108 Memorial: The life and lessons of my father, David Gates
40 min

Many of you may know that my relationship with my father was unique in that he was my father, but he was also a creative director, my mentor, my first boss, and the foundation of everything I am. On October 5th, 2020, he suddenly passed away. In this episode, I want to share my father's story as a designer and creative director, how my life has been a direct reaction to his career, and in sharing those stories, I hope you can better understand me, my father, and yourself.

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Resourceful Designer
Resourceful Designer
Mark Des Cotes
Cloud Sync vs Cloud Backup - RD238
Do you know when to use Cloud Backup vs Cloud Sync? You know how important it is to backup your computer. Should the unforeseen happen, your backup is all that stands between you getting back to work after a short delay or having to explain to your clients how you’ve lost everything you’ve designed for them and have to start over. In the old days of computing, a backup consisted of storing files on floppy disks. Then we graduated to things like Zip drives or Jaz drives. Then CDs and DVDs became the preferred method for backing up files. Depending on your organization's size, and of course, your budget, you could also back up to digital tape. These were the easily transportable backup methods—the ones you could take with you or store safely off-site. You also needed to back up to external hard drives. Expensive, bulky things that were great for backing up your entire computer, but you needed a couple of them for a true backup solution. Constantly swapping them with one backing up in-house while the other was safely stored off-site. Things have come a long way since those days. The price of hard drives has come way down, making backup much more affordable. And you can now store hundreds of thousands of files on a drive smaller in size than a stick of gum. So there’s no excuse for not having a backup solution in place. Out of these methods, the one flaw in most backup strategies has always been the off-site backup. Most people start with the best intentions. Moving a fresh backup off-site every day. Then, as time went by and nothing catastrophic happened, those daily off-site backups became weekly backups, and then monthly backups, until you had to check a calendar to figure out when the last backup was made. Whether your backup was daily, weekly, monthly or more didn’t make much difference... until your main system failed you. Boy, oh, boy, did it make a difference then. It’s bad enough if you lost a day's worth of work, but to lose a whole week or more? That’s catastrophic. For anyone around computers in the 90s and early 2000s, you’ve heard the horror stories of crashed computers without backups. Hopefully, those stories were not about you. Introducing The Cloud And then The Cloud was born. The mysterious digital cloud. A place... somewhere, where you can store your files safely, offsite, without having to take a hard drive or disks anywhere. Ok, that’s enough of a history lesson. It’s 2020 as I'm typing this, and I’m hoping you've heard of the cloud and how to use it to back up your files. But just in case, the cloud is simply a group of computers somewhere in the world, managed by some company. These groups of computers are also known as data centres. When you sign up for a cloud syncing or cloud backup service, you are in effect renting storage space in one of these data centres. Sorry if I ruined your idea of The Cloud being a magical storage space floating around in the sky. Even though cloud sync and cloud backup use similar data centers, they are different in how they function. There’s a common misconception that they’re the same thing, but they’re not. In fact, if you want to go by today’s standard backup practices, you should be using both sync and backup. If you’re not, you may be compromising your backup strategy. The difference between Cloud Sync and Cloud Backup. Cloud Sync. In essence, Cloud Sync are services such as Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive and many others who work by designating specific areas of your hard drives such as a single folder or a group of folders and “synchronizing” the contents of those folders to their data center. This syncing service allows you to access your files from different locations and using different devices. Let's say you save a design file to your sync folder on your iMac. That file becomes available to you on your laptop's sync folder, making it easy to show clients while visiting their office. While with the client, you can make changes to the file, knowing those changes will sync and be available on your iMac once you return. If you need to get a 3rd party contractor involved, such as a copywriter, share the synced file with them, and any changes they make will be reflected on your file as well. As long as the file is in the sync folder, it can be opened, worked on and saved from anywhere. What’s important to note is that only files stored in the synced folder are accessible from everywhere. If it’s an Adobe InDesign file, InDesign needs to be installed on your iMac, your laptop and on any third party’s computer who needs to access the file. However, things like fonts and any digital assets used by the file stored in the synced folder are not available from everywhere. If you forget to put it in your sync folder, it won’t get synced. Most syncing services charge you based on the amount of data you store with them. If you need more room, they always offer a bigger and more expensive tier you could purchase. One of the downsides of cloud sync services is that should something happen to the file on one device, it happens everywhere. For example, say the copywriter accidentally deletes the file. It’s deleted on your computer as well. Depending on what level you are paying for, some syncing services offer a version history feature, so you can go back and recover a file that was accidentally deleted up to a certain point. One more thing to note. Should your computer be compromised with a virus or get hacked and the synced folder on your computer be affected, having your files synced to the cloud won't help because they will also be affected. Cloud Backup. A Cloud Backup service, such as Backblaze or Carbonite, works in the background. In most cases, once you set it up, you don’t even realize it’s there. It monitors everything on your computer and backs up any new or changed data it finds to the cloud. Usually, you pay one fee for unlimited cloud backup storage space. There’s no tiered pricing. Most cloud backup solutions offer version history, so if a file on your computer gets corrupted, or if after working on it for a while, you decide you liked the previous version instead, you can access an earlier version from the backup. It’s very similar to Apple’s Time Machine or other similar services, but it’s in the cloud. Because Cloud Backup is automated, there’s no need to put your files into a dedicated syncing folder. Your entire computer is backed up, so you know that everything is protected, your files, applications, fonts, everything. Unlike Cloud Sync, you are not working directly on the files in the cloud. Any changes you make to a local file are not automatically reflected on your other devices unless you are also storing them in a Cloud Sync folder. You can still share cloud backup files with someone else, but once downloaded, any changes they make to the file will not show up on your end. Cloud backup is there to protect you should something happen to your computer, and not just should something happen to certain dedicated files and folders. Best-case scenario The best-case scenario is you use both a Cloud Sync and a Cloud Backup solution. That’s what I do. I use both Dropbox to house files I need to access from multiple devices or share with others. And I use Backblaze to make sure everything on my computer is safely backed up to the cloud. Recovering your data from Cloud Sync or Cloud Backup. Should you need to recover your cloud data, there are some differences to note between the two services. Retrieving all your files from Cloud Sync can be cumbersome and take a long time, especially if you pay and use one of the higher tiers. It could take several days to download everything, and you better have unlimited internet, or else you’ll be paying an arm and a leg for overage fees. A Cloud Backup service such as Backblaze also allows you to download your files over the internet, but Backblaze has a servic…
24 min
User Defenders: Podcast – UX Design and Personal Growth
User Defenders: Podcast – UX Design and Personal Growth
Jason Ogle
074: Designers, Mind Your Business with Pek Pongpaet
Pek Pongpaet teaches us how to be business-minded designers. He reveals how designers with business knowledge and more tools in their tool belt will get hired more often than ones without and with less. He shows us how to get a seat at the table while challenging us to count the costs of actually having one. He motivates us to measure and quantify our designs. He also inspires us to get out of our comfort zones and talk to other disciplines and become consumers of information in the area(s) we desire growth in. * Why Should We Listen to Pek? (05:04) * Why Should Designers Understand Business More? (7:07) * How Do I Begin to Care More About Business? (11:05) * How Do I Learn More About the Business Model? Who Do I Talk To? (14:22) * How Can Designers Influence Product/Business Strategy and Quantify Their Work? (16:52) * How Do I Know That Something I Designed Achieved Its Business Goal? (20:18) * What Do You Look For In a Designer When Hiring? (24:50) * Why You Should be Best Friends with Your Analytics Person/Team (26:20) * How Can Designers do a Better Job Communicating the Business Value of Design to Non-Believing Stakeholders? (30:21) * How Does a Designer Get a Seat at the Round Table? (33:29) * What's Your Best Advice for Designers Wanting to Grow in Business Side of Design? (40:45) * Best Way to Connect and Keep Up? (45:45) Check out the detailed show notes including mentioned links, transcript and Cesar Lemus’s astonishing superhero artwork at userdefenders.com/074 This episode is made possible by WhiteHatJunior.com: the world’s best one on one coding classes for kids between the ages of 6 and 14. WhiteHatJunior's unique teaching methodology makes it easy to absorb tough concepts because the teacher is able to focus completely on one student. Give it a shot: go to userdefenders.com/whj to book a free coding class to see for yourself just how easy it is for your child to learn coding!
53 min
Wireframe
Wireframe
Adobe
Why are elections so hard to design well?
Please tell us more about what you like about Wireframe. Tap here and complete our audience survey. The fundamental design feature of a democratic society is a citizen's right to vote. But ensuring that every person is able to vote is not as easy as it seems. Everything from how you design a paper ballot, build an electronic terminal, process a mail-in ballot, engineer a public space for private voting, and so on, brings hundreds of complicated design decisions. We look at how design choices are sometimes at odds with political ones. In this episode: Wireframe producer Dominic Girard and host Khoi Vinh learn why designing for elections is a never-ending challenge. After the 2000 US Presidential Election, voter Andre Fladell sued after a flaw in the design of his ballot caused him to vote for the wrong candidate. Drew Davies of Oxide Design loves trying to bring order to ballot chaos, and has been trying to help the civic design process for nearly twenty years. Designer Whitney Quesenbery at the Center for Civic Design has been leading the charge in all things election design - and continues to support election officials on everything from signage, to electronic machines to mail-in ballots. Meanwhile, Los Angeles County redesigned their voting systems this year. Called the Voter Solutions for All People, it's an ambitious project that updates the county's ballot machines to something modern, electronic, secure and, most importantly, user friendly. Kate Ludicrum and Jon Fox talk about how they helped it come together in time for the California Primary. Read the PDF transcript of this episode Wireframe reveals the stories behind user experience design and how it helps technology fit into our lives. It’s a podcast for UX/UI designers, graphic designers, and the design-curious. Hosted by Khoi Vinh, one of Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People in Business. Learn more about designing with Adobe XD at adobe.ly/tryxd.
30 min
Being Freelance
Being Freelance
Being Freelance - The freelancing podcast with Steve Folland and a stack of inspiring freelancer stories
Build processes to delegate - Freelance Web Designer and Strategist John D. Saunders
This episode is kindly supported by With Jack! _With Jack help keep you in business by supporting you financially or legally if you have problems with a client._ Get _the freelance insurance you deserve._ _Visit __withjack.co.uk__ and be a confident freelancer._ John’s first client was his mum, a teacher in need of a website so she could offer one-to-one tutoring. Today, after spending four years learning the ropes in an agency, John’s running his own agency as well as three other businesses and online courses. John worked 18-hour days while he was a full-time employee building his freelance portfolio on the side. Six years later and with everything he’s got going on, John’s enjoying a comfortable working week with plenty of time left over for his young family. He’s learned to trust his team and step away from the creative work to focus on managing projects and operations. He tells Steve how he’s built standard processes in his business that allow him to delegate easily and well. Love learning from other freelancers like this? Check out the website beingfreelance.com, be part of the Being Freelance Community! You'll also find useful links for this episode. That's beingfreelance.com Like VIDEO? - Check out the Being Freelance vlog - YouTube.com/SteveFolland Who the hell is Steve Folland? You know how everyone bangs on about how powerful video and audio content can be? Yeah, well Steve helps businesses make it and make the most of it. Find out more at www.stevefolland.com Track him down on Twitter @sfolland or lay a trail of cake and he'll eventually catch you up.
41 min
Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Jason Swenk
How to Build a Great Agency Instead of Just a Big One
Have you ever felt embarrassed by the size of your agency? Do you think success is wrongfully tied to the size of your team? Have you been worried about how the current economy is affecting your business and your clients? Change is a painful part of growing, but it's one of the best teachers when you're looking to build a great agency, not just a big agency. In this episode, we'll cover: * How to move forward during an economic crisis. * Why your ego could be holding your agency back. * Why fast growth isn't the best solution. I talked to Mark DiMassimo, Chief Creative at DiMassimo Goldstein, an agency he founded in New York in 1996. In the early years of the agency, Mark hit the ground running. By 1997, DiMassimo Goldstein was the fasted growing agency around. Within a couple of years, the agency had offices in San Francisco, and New York, and Mark was featured on the cover of a magazine. And then the dot com bust hit, forcing him to take his staff down from a peak of 114 to 30. Mark shares the way he learned that a big agency team doesn't always correlate to the agency's level of success. How to Move Forward During Economic Crisis "One of the most important things I learned is what a pleasure and an honor it is to do this business. What a pleasure and an honor it is to be able to think, dream, learn from great business leaders, daydream, write, have visions, have a chance to get visions produced to work," Mark said. Even though the industry pain points of deadlines, uncertainty, competition, he still feels a little sheepish calling it work. Mark has had the unfortunate experience of letting dozens of good employees go and yet he says those difficult times are all the more reason to do what needs to be done to help the business survive them. You loved the agency when you started it and when you started to grow it. The challenge is continuing to love it and carrying over that sense of pride you have even during the dark times. Why Your Ego Could Be Holding Your Agency Back Have you noticed that agencies are judged by the size of their team? But judging success level by size isn't accurate. After the dot com bust, Mark found himself in therapy and learning to meditate. He learned to leverage his skills to take advantage of any skill he could use to help ally the vision he had of his agency with where he was. One of the lessons he learned during this phase of his life and his agency was his ego only really matters to him. "People don't really care. They care about you as a person, but they don't care if you grew and sold your agency. They don't care if you didn't." Letting go of your ego and the need to feed your ego by growing your agency whether you need to or not helps you gain freedom. And that freedom allows you to make your agency into what you want it to be. Letting go of your ego is also important during your agency's tough times. Having the ability to reach out to others for advice, without worrying about what they might think another tool for achieving your vision. Why Fast Growth Isn't the Best Solution Change is what makes us necessary, Mark says. Dealing with the way change impacts clients is probably one of the reasons you started an agency. Mark says it is equally important to be upfront with your clients when you're dealing with changes within your agency. Because your clients are in the world of business, they understand the need to be lean and focused. While creating a solution to whatever problem your agency is struggling with, communication and transparency go a long way in building goodwill with your clients. The best solutions generally have one main ingredient: time. Mark learned the hard lesson that fast growth is not good growth. No business can really be successful running on high speed forever. If you're growing too fast, you likely haven't come up with contingencies if the industry inevitably changes. And if you're currently in the midst of a changing industry and only now trying to chart a path to the future, you will not have it perfectly figured out right away. But you can certainly have fun while you figure it out. Struggling to maintain consistent project work and revenue streams? Check out SharpSpring. They’ve built a low-cost, comprehensive marketing, and sales platform. SharpSpring helps agencies increase their margins and build consistent monthly recurring revenue. For a limited time, you can get a live demo of SharpSpring and see what it’s like to use a platform built specifically for agencies. Also, be sure you check out SharpSpring's FREE Agency Acceleration Series featuring presentations by some of today's best marketers -- including the one and only Seth Godin.
30 min
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