Future Positive
Future Positive
Jan 25, 2021
Smartphones In Healthcare And The Current Pandemic
Play • 1 hr 2 min

Much of the fundamental research in computer science has been driven by the needs of those attempting to utilize computing for various applications, including healthcare. Today’s guest, Shwetak Patel describes a collection of research projects that leverage mobile phone technology in new ways to enable the screening, self-management and studying of diseases. 

 

By using mobile phones as healthcare devices, we can enable access and scale, helping advance health and clinical science through the convergence of sensing, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. 

 

Today’s episode was originally recorded at AI For Good, an annual global summit hosted by ITU and XPRIZE, and while some elements of the conversation are more timely to COVID’s spread in July 2020 at the time of recording, all of the technology is still relevant today.  

 

Shwetak Naran Patel is an American computer scientist and entrepreneur best known for his work on developing novel sensing solutions and ubiquitous computing. He is the Washington Research Foundation Entrepreneurship Endowed Professor at the University of Washington in Computer Science & Engineering and Electrical Engineering, where he joined in 2008. His technology start-up company on energy sensing, Zensi, was acquired by Belkin International, Inc. in 2010. He was named a 2011 MacArthur Fellow. He was named the recipient of the 2018 ACM Prize in Computing for contributions to creative and practical sensing systems for sustainability and health.

 

 

Links: 

https://aiforgood.itu.int/ 

https://xprize.org/blog





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The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
Melina Palmer
141. Where CX and Behavioral Science Meet, interview with Jennifer Clinehens, author of Choice Hacking
Today I am so excited to introduce you to Jennifer Clinehens. She is currently CX Strategy Director at Havas CX Helia, London, where she uses behavioral science and psychology to improve the customer experience for brands like Lloyds Banking Group and Compare the Market. Jennifer has helped mold experiences with behavioral science for brands like McDonald's, AT&T, O2, and Adidas across the globe. She is also the author of four books including the one we will be discussing today, Choice Hacking: How to use psychology and behavioral science to create an experience that sings, AND she has two different podcasts, Choice Hacking and Everybody Hates Your Brand. Wow, talk about a busy and productive person, amirite? I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Show Notes: * [00:40] Today I am so excited to introduce you to Jennifer Clinehens. She is currently CX Strategy Director at Havas CX Helia, London. * [03:05] Jennifer shares her background and how she got involved in behavioral science. She has been lucky to work for many companies across many countries. * [04:35] A lot of the work she has been doing lately has been about the intersection between behavioral science and psychology. She takes those principles and applies them to experience design. * [06:48] One of the big things Jennifer does is framing touchpoints. * [09:39] Crossing over from one medium to another is a difficult point where we often lose some potential customers. There are a lot of steps that happen in the customer journey process. * [10:28] Generally, when you design a customer journey you use a customer journey map: a visual representation of what the customer journey is. * [10:45] On a map the customer journey is linear, but in real life it is messy. Yes, we have a beautiful picture of what the customer journey should be, but in the back of your mind, you have to be pragmatic. * [11:49] The closer we can get to design touchpoints and customer communications with a scientific approach or foundation to apply it to the real world the better it is. * [13:08] The number one thing brands seem to get wrong (or miss completely) is peak-end and applying it across the customer journey. The emotional journey is the secret sauce. * [14:17] A lot of brands get their ending wrong. They don’t know where the real ending is. * [15:41] Brands, in general, don’t realize that the last mile (the true ending) is so critical in so many ways. * [16:17] Jennifer shares an example of Disney realizing the customer journey didn’t end when you left their park. * [17:19] Making the very end of your experience even better and more exciting means your memory of the time you spent in Disneyland is even better. It is how you are constructing the memory, it is not about every single moment you had. It is that emotional peak and true ending that matter. * [17:57] “A brand is a memory.” Peter Steidl (from one of Melina’s “go-to” brainy books, Neurobranding, linked below) * [20:33] There are a few different ways you can look for that true end in your business. * [21:44] Part of the issue of finding that true ending also has to do with silos. * [23:56] The brands that measure on a journey-level versus a touchpoint level have much more value at the end of the day. * [25:32] Melina shares how an online mattress company handles its customer journey. * [27:16] It is important to think through all the moments in the experience: where there could be problems and frustrations and turning it into a really great shareable moment/story. Then you have different associations with that brand. * [28:30] Going that little bit extra and saying “Is that really the end of the customer experience?” is so important. * [29:14] Jennifer shares some of her favorite concepts. Peak-end is her favorite, but the most overlooked is visual salience. * [31:27] Melina shares her experience when she toured the Human Behavior Lab at Texas A&M. * [33:46] Jennifer encourages brands to have someone who is responsible for making sure effectiveness and emotion are being delivered on in the journey level. * [36:20] When you know what you are looking for then you can see if you are on track and put in those nudges. If you don’t know the end game, it is not as effective as it could be. The quality of the work is in the quality of the brief. * [38:06] Making choices easy is so much of what they do. Getting brands to understand where to get people ready to buy is the first step. * [39:15] The first thing they do is think: “Where are the points we need to be nudging to action?” and “Where are the points we need to be inspiring people?” They are usually not the same place. * [39:23] The book Choice Hacking is a good first start for people to think about a framework to apply this at the journey level. * [40:11] Melina’s closing reflections. * [41:46] Grab Melina’s brand new book, What Your Customer Wants (And Can’t Tell You), which is now on presale! Thanks for listening. Don’t forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show. Let’s connect: * Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com * The Brainy Business® on Facebook * The Brainy Business on Twitter * The Brainy Business on Instagram * The Brainy Business on LinkedIn * Melina on LinkedIn * The Brainy Business on Youtube More from The Brainy Business: * Master Your Mindset Mini-Course * BE Thoughtful Revolution - use code BRAINY to save 10% * Get Your FREE ebook * Melina’s John Mayer Pandora Station! Listen to what she listens to while working. Get the Books Mentioned on this Episode: * Choice Hacking * Free Chapter of Choice Hacking * Neurobranding Connect with Jennifer: * Jennifer on Twitter * More About Jennifer Past Episodes and Other Important Links: * Texas A&M Certificate Program * Inside the Texas A&M Human Behavior Lab * iMotions (The main software the Human Behavior Lab runs on.) * NUDGES & Choice Architecture * Framing * Priming * Interview with Will Leach * Peak-End Rule * Surprise and Delight * The Overwhelmed Brain and Its Impact on Decision Making * Interview with Roger Dooley * Time Discounting * Reciprocity Check out (and preorder!) my upcoming book, What Your Customer Wants (And Can’t Tell You) on Amazon, Bookshop, and Barnes & Noble If you are outside the US, please complete this form to be first to know when the book is available near you AND to help show there is a presence in your country to speed along international agreements and get it to you faster!
44 min
Reversing Climate Change
Reversing Climate Change
Nori
S2E53: Paul Kingsnorth on the shared roots of climate crisis, transhumanism, & immortality
_Paul Kingsnorth_ is tired of talking about the scope of the climate crisis. In his view, we can’t fix climate change. But we can uncover the spiritual root of the problem and explore how we might live through it. Paul is the founder of _The Dark Mountain Project_ and a prolific writer of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. His latest release, _the novel __Alexandria_, serves as the capstone of the acclaimed _Buckmaster Trilogy_. On this episode of Reversing Climate Change, Paul joins Ross to discuss the connection Paul sees between transhumanism and the climate crisis, explaining what’s behind our ideology against limits and why he believes the mind and soul can’t live separate from the body. Paul shares his take on capitalism versus distributism, describing how systems of radical local democracy would root us in community and prevent the kind of scale that leads to tyranny. Listen in for Paul’s insight on the emptying of the will at the heart of most religious traditions and learn why he believes a connection with something greater than ourselves is key to effective activism. Connect with Nori _Purchase Nori Carbon Removals_ _Join Nori's book club on Patreon_ _Nori's website_ _Nori on Twitter_ Resources _Paul’s Website_ _The Dark Mountain Project_ _Alexandria __by Paul Kingsnorth_ _Confessions of a Recovering Environmentalist and Other Essays __by Paul Kingsnorth_ _Savage Gods __by Paul Kingsnorth_ _Ronald Wright on The Progress Trap_ _What Technology Wants __by Kevin Kelly_ _The Metamorphosis of Prime Intellect __by Roger Williams_ _‘The Immortal’ by Jorge Luis Borges_ _Gnosticism_ _Distributism_ _Catholic Social Teaching_ _Dorothy Day_ _Rerum Novarum__, papal encyclical by Pope Leo XIII_ _The Kingdom of God is Within You __by Leo Tolstoy_ _Hieromonk Gabriel on Orthodox Christianity and Politics_ _God’s Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible __by Adam Nicolson_ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/reversingclimatechange/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/reversingclimatechange/support
1 hr 17 min
LSE IQ podcast
LSE IQ podcast
London School of Economics and Political Science
Scroungers versus Strivers: the myth of the welfare state
Contributor(s): Professor John Hills | This episode is dedicated to social policy giant Professor Sir John Hills, who died in December 2020. In this episode, John tackles the myth that the welfare state supports a feckless underclass who cost society huge amounts of money. Instead, he sets out a system where most of what we pay in, comes back to us. He describes a generational contract which we all benefit from, varying on our stage of life. His words remain timely after a year of pandemic which has devastated many people’s livelihoods. Many of us have had to rely on state support in ways that we could not have anticipated, perhaps challenging our ideas about what type of person receives benefits in the UK. This episode is based on an interview that John did with James Rattee for the LSE iQ podcast in 2017. It coincided with the LSE Festival which celebrated the anniversary of the publication of the ‘Beveridge Report’ in 1947 - a blueprint for a British universal care system by former LSE Director William Beveridge. Professor Sir John Hills CBE, was Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE and Chair of CASE. His influential work didn’t just critique government policy on poverty and inequality, it changed it. He advised on a wide range of issues including pensions reform, fuel poverty, council housing, income and wealth distribution.   Contributors Professor John Hills   Research Good Times Bad Times: the welfare myth of them and us. Bristol: Policy Press by John Hills (2015)
20 min
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
Economics Explained
The "Perfect" Little Economy of New Zealand
This is new Zealand, a picturesque nation whos economy looks to exclusively rely on throwing their tourists off cliffs in increasingly imaginative ways and being left off of world maps. But Australia’s little brother is so much more than that and it might truely be the world’s best managed economy. Everything from the world banks ease of doing business index, from multiple quality of life assessments puts new zealand in the top spot. Move aside Norway. What’s more is that it has achieved this remarkable prosperity despite not having a huge supply of natural resources, or acting as some tax haven for global businesses like so many other apparent economic miracles we have explored before. No New Zealand has got to where it is today by carefully managing a market economy and providing a safe, stable and confidence inspiring place to start a family, a business, and a career. Of course there are still some problems and we will certainly get to them but after exploring the Economy of Argentina last week, it’s now time to get out your pen and paper and take notes on how to actually run an economy. And to do this as always we are going to break the economy into some important categories. What are the primary drivers of New Zealand's economic prosperity? How has the nation been able to accommodate these where other nations fail to do so? And what are the challenges the nation might face to keep this success going? Once thats all done we can then put New zealand on the economics explained national leaderboard.
18 min
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