An Indigenous Mixtape from Lima, Peru
46 min

Meet Liberato Kani, a hip hop artist in Lima, Peru—or as he says, “the Andean Bronx”. At his concerts, a typical call and response you hear is "Quechua es resistencia": Quechua is resistance. Though Quechua is spoken by nearly ten million people, Peru's native language is at risk of dying off because of anti-indigenous prejudice. Liberato and other musicians like Renata Flores are here to save it—and restore a country's pride while they're at it. Want to talk more about the show? Share your favorite artist from this episode with host Saleem Reshamwala (@Kidethnic) on Twitter.

This episode features music and interviews from Liberato Kani, Renata Flores, Kayfex, and Uchpa's guitarist and songwriter Marcos Maizel. Listen to more from these artists on TED's Spotify playlist, "Quechua es Resistencia

Pindrop is produced by Jesse Baker and Eric Nuzum of Magnificent Noise for TED. Our production staff includes Elyse Blennerhassett, Oscar Durand, Kim Nederveen Pieterse, Sabrina Farhi, Hiwote Getaneh, Angela Cheng, and Michelle Quint, with the guidance of Roxanne Hai Lash and Colin Helms. Additional recordings by Whitney Henry-Lester and Hernando Suarez. Translation and transcription by Hernando Suárez, Eilis O’Neill, and Oscar Durand. This episode was mixed and sound designed by Kristin Mueller.

Women Who Travel
Women Who Travel
Condé Nast Traveler
The Books Helping Us Escape Right Now
There may be no better time than winter to cozy up, ideally by a fire, with a stack of books and a cup of coffee (or something a little stronger). This particular winter, though, the escape and education we find through books will be even more necessary. Whether you're picking up books for yourself or sending hefty hardcovers to family and friends as holiday gifts, we have some suggestions that will distract, entertain, and inform—all by female writers spread across the world. (Translated Japanese authors were surprisingly popular this episode.) Joining us to share their favorite recent reads are Riverhead Books' associate publisher Jynne Dilling-Martin and Kalima DeSuze, activist and founder of the Cafe con Libros bookstore in Brooklyn.  Here's a full list of what we talked about: Oreo, by Fran Ross Lobizona, by Romina Garber The Fifth Season, by N.K. Jemisin The Memory Police, by Yoko Ogawa Convenience Store Woman, by Suyaka Murata Tokyo Ueno Station, by Yu Miri The Custom of the Country, by Edith Wharton The Lying Life of Adults, by Elena Ferrante The Neapolitan Novels, by Elena Ferrante The Japanese Table, by Sofia Hellsten Luster, by Raven Leilani Hurricane Season, by Fernanda Melchor Read a transcription of the episode here: https://www.cntraveler.com/story/the-books-helping-us-escape-right-now-women-who-travel-podcast Follow Kalima's Cafe con Libros: @cafeconlibros_bk Follow Jynne: @jynnnne Follow Lale: @lalehannah Follow Meredith: @ohheytheremere All products featured on Condé Nast Traveler are independently selected by our editors. If you buy something through our retail links, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
38 min
Working Scientist
Working Scientist
Nature Careers
Planning a postdoc before moving to industry? Think again
Experience as a postdoctoral researcher might not fast-track your career outside academia, Julie Gould discovers. Nessa Carey, a UK entrepreneur and technology-transfer professional whose career has straddled academia and industry, including a senior role at Pfizer, shares insider knowledge on how industry employers often view postdoctoral candidates. She also offers advice on CVs and preparing for interviews. “It is very tempting sometimes for people to keep on postdoc-ing, especially if they have a lab head who has a lot of rolling budget and who likes having the same postdocs there, because they're productive and they know them,” she says. “That’s great for the lab head. It’s typically very, very bad for the individual postdoc,” she adds. Carey is joined by Shulamit Kahn, an economist at Boston University in Massachusetts, who co-authored a 2017 paper about the impact of postdoctoral training on early careers in biomedicine1. According to the paper, published in Nature Biotechnology, employers did not financially value the training or skills obtained during postdoc training. “Based on these findings, the majority of PhDs would be financially better off if they skipped the postdoc entirely,” it concludes. Malcolm Skingle, academic liaison at GlaxoSmithKline, adds: “You really will get people who have done their PhD, they’ve done a two-year postdoc, they think they’re pretty much going to run the world and single-handedly develop a drug. “They have got no idea how difficult drug discovery is, and their place in that very big jigsaw.” “And why don’t postdocs get great salaries straightaway? Well, actually, they haven’t proven themselves in our environment, where, if they’re any good, then their salaries will go up quite quickly.”   See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
22 min
More episodes
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu