Sara Seager, THE SMALLEST LIGHT IN THE UNIVERSE
27 min

Sara Seager is an preeminent astronomer, planetary scientist, and MIT professor whose luminous memoir is about how she had to reinvent herself in the wake of tragedy and discovered the power of connection on this planet as she searches our galaxy for another Earth. It's one of Zibby's favorite recent books and she talked with Sara about grief, rebuilding, and our earth and beyond.

Reading Women
Reading Women
Reading Women
Interview with Leigh Bardugo
In this week’s episode, Kendra and Joce talk to Leigh Bardugo, the author of Ninth House, which is out now in paperback from Flatiron, and The Lives of Saints, which is out from Imprint. Grab one of our totes for 20% off by heading over to our Etsy Store! Thank you to The House of Chanel for sponsoring this episode. Find out more at inside.Chanel.com. Check out our Patreon page to learn more about our book club and other Patreon-exclusive goodies. Follow along over on Instagram, join the discussion in our Goodreads group, and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter for more new books and extra book reviews! Lutz Get Down to Business We are two cousins from opposite ends of the globe who have way too many opinions about figure skating! So we decided to record ourselves talking about anything and everything that has recently gone down in the skating world. Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Other Platforms Instagram | Twitter Books Mentioned Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo Lives of Saints by Leigh Bardugo Author Bio Leigh Bardugo is the New York Times bestselling author of Ninth House and the creator of the Grishaverse (coming soon to Netflix) which spans the Shadow and Bone Trilogy, the Six of Crows Duology, The Language of Thorns, and the King of Scars duology. Her short stories can be found in multiple anthologies, including Best American Science Fiction & Fantasy. Leigh grew up in Southern California and graduated from Yale University. These days she lives and writes in Los Angeles. Website | Twitter Buy the Book CONTACT Questions? Comments? Email us hello@readingwomenpodcast.com.  SOCIAL MEDIA Reading Women Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Website Music by Isaac Greene Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
44 min
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed
Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly
25: A Writer’s Territory
The Scottish nature writer Jim Crumley takes the Slightly Foxed team on a tour of literary landscapes, from the lochs of the Trossachs and the mountainous Cairngorms to Aldo Leopold’s sand county in Wisconsin and Barry Lopez’s Arctic. Together they trace the chain of writers who have influenced Jim, from Robert Burns and Wordsworth to Thoreau and Walt Whitman, and see nature through the eyes of his hero, the great Scottish naturalist and photographer Seton Gordon. They discuss how folklore has demonized the wolf while Jim believes its reintroduction could hugely benefit the ecology of the Scottish landscape. And finally they venture off the beaten track with this month’s wide-ranging reading recommendations. Please find links to books, articles, and further reading listed below. The digits in brackets following each listing refer to the minute and second they are mentioned. (Episode duration: 40 minutes; 24 seconds) Books Mentioned We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch (mailto:jess@foxedquarterly.com) with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.  An Englishman’s Commonplace Book (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/an-englishmans-commonplace-book/) , Roger Hudson (1:14) A Boy at the Hogarth Press & A Parcel of Time (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hogarth-press-richard-kennedy-plain-foxed/) , Richard Kennedy (6:40)  Jim Crumley’s Seasonal Quartet: The Nature of Autumn (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-autumn/) , The Nature of Winter (https://saraband.net/sb-title/the-nature-of-winter/) , The Nature of Spring (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-spring/) , The Nature of Summer (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-the-nature-of-summer/) (11:03) The Cairngorm Hills of Scotland, The Charm of Skye and Amid Snowy Wastes, Seton Gordon are out print, but some Seton Gordon titles are available from Trieste Publishing (https://triestepublishing.com/) (14:11) A High and Lonely Place (https://foxedquarterly.com/jim-crumley-a-high-and-lonely-place/) , Jim Crumley (15:49) A Sand County Almanac (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/aldo-leopold-sand-county-almanac/) , Aldo Leopold (18:14) Arctic Dreams (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/barry-lopez-arctic-dreams/) , Barry Lopez (18:43) The Last Wolf (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/him-crumley-the-last-wolf/) , Jim Crumley (22:54) Highland River, Neil Gunn is currently out of stock at the publisher (31:07) Featherhood (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/charlie-gilmour-featherhood/) , Charlie Gilmour (33:28) The Silver Dark Sea (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/susan-fletcher-the-silver-dark-sea/) , Susan Fletcher (35:13) A Month in Siena (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/hisham-matar-a-month-in-siena/) , Hisham Matar (36:12) The Hunting Party (https://foxedquarterly.com/shop/lucy-foley-hunting-party/) , Lucy Foley (38:00) Related Slightly Foxed Articles Word from the Wood (https://foxedquarterly.com/aldo-leopold-sand-country-almanac-literary-review/) , Galen O’Hanlon on A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold, Issue 54 (18:14) Northern Lights (https://foxedquarterly.com/penelope-lively-barry-lopez-arctic-dreams-literary-review/) , Penelope Lively on Arctic Dreams, Barry Lopez, Issue 4 (18:43) Other Links An Englishmans’ Commonplace Book ‘launch party’ at John Sandoe Books (https://foxedquarterly.com/book-launch-roger-hudson-an-englishmans-commonplace-book-john-sandoe-books/) (1:19)  The Art Workers’ Guild (https://www.artworkersguild.org/) (1:54)  Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park (https://www.lochlomond-trossachs.org/) (8:37)  Saraband, independent publisher (https://saraband.net/) (12:20)  Jim Crumley, The Scots Magazine (https://www.scotsmagazine.com/articles/category/explore/wildlife/) (31:56) Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable (https://www.podcastable.co.uk/)
40 min
What Should I Read Next?
What Should I Read Next?
Anne Bogel | Wondery
Ep 261: Huggable comfort reads for a cozy reading season
Readers have asked us for “comfort reads” over and over again this year — and it's totally understandable. “Comfort read” means something different to every reader, but if you’re looking for books that slow your heart rate, soothe your soul, and make you want to travel to a quiet English village, this episode is for you.  Today’s guest Gina House appreciates cozy, comforting reads that feel like a warm hug. She adores cozy mysteries like Agatha Christie novels, but she could do without the murder. So today, Anne recommends charming books that pair well with a comfy chair and a cup of tea.  Visit the podcast website at whatshouldireadnextpodcast.com/261 to see the full list of titles discussed, an episode transcript, and more. Thanks to today's sponsors: * Framebridge makes it easier and more affordable than ever to frame your favorite things - without ever leaving the house. From art prints and posters to the photos sitting on your phone, you can Framebridge just about anything. WSIRN listeners get 15% off your first order at Frambebridge.com with code READNEXT. * Over 850,000 families have trusted LegacyBox to digitally preserve their past and they have a team of over 200 trained technicians. Get started preserving your past today, with an incredible limited-time 60% OFF your first kit at LegacyBox.com/READNEXT while supplies last. * Brooklinen is the perfect place to find all the comforts for home, including ultra-soft towels — they offer varying levels of plushness, so you can choose the towel experience that feels most spa-like to you! WSIRN listeners can use promo code READNEXT for 10% off your first order at Brooklinen.com.
53 min
Get Booked
Get Booked
Book Riot
E259: Our Holiday Recommendations Show!
Amanda and Jenn answer holiday gift-giving questions in this week’s episode of Get Booked. Subscribe to the podcast via RSS, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher. Questions 1. Hi! I’m looking for a gift idea for my 55 year old brother-in-law. He’s a retired jailer, anti-vaxxer, Republican who can trounce anyone at Jeopardy! He likes to learn things but is not a huge reader. He’s been on a Bill O’Reilly kick but I would like to find him something with an alternative point of view that might still be interesting to him and keep him engaged.  Thanks, love your podcast and you both! -Leenie 2. Hi Amanda and Jenn!! I love your podcast and listen to it regularly. I’m looking for a book for my 17 year old brother for the holidays, but since I’m younger than him and I’m not really into the same books as him anyway, I’m at a loss for what to purchase. He loves long epic fantasy series and horror (he has read a good chunk of all the Stephen King stuff and loved The Dark Tower series especially, but also likes books more in line with the Lord of the Rings books and A Song of Ice and Fire series). Again, he is seventeen, so more adult-ish books are fine, he just isn’t a fan of a bunch of romance. Also, if your picks could be series’ that already have all/most of the books out, that would be much appreciated. Thanks a million!! -Quinn 3. Hello ladies. I was hoping you could help me find a couple good books to give my father for Xmas this year. His favorite genres tend to be historical fiction (which I don’t read much of personally) or science-y nonfiction (he is a retired anesthesiologist with a passion for plants). Some books he has read and enjoyed are A Gentleman in Moscow, Bill Bryson’s books (The Body &  A Short History of Nearly Everything), Cutting for Stone, Barkskins, Ken Follet’s books, & Mary Roach’s books. He can be a little depressive and this has been a hard year (for everyone) so something not too heavy/depressing might be better. Maybe steer clear of war (he found Grunt particularly depressing as it highlighted the many ways we’ve worked to destroy each other). I was considering Homegoing or Pachinko as I’ve heard so many positive things about them and think the family saga aspect seems similar to Cutting for Stone, but they do both also seem potentially heavy subject matter. Caitlin Doughty is also already on his list as my younger sister was considering pursuing mortuary science for a time. Thanks!  -Jean 4. I’m looking for a book to get for a friend for Christmas. She’s a middle school science teacher (but she’s trying to get into a high school) so I usually get her science based books. Years past I’ve gotten her The Emperor of all Maladies and Get Well Soon. She suffers from depression and climate change can be a trigger for her, so while I think she would love Lab Girl, I think it might be too much, especially this year.  Can you help me? -Angela 5. Looking for a Christmas book for my 10 year old nephew. He loves a rags to riches type story,  especially about sports.  A recent fav was Unstoppable by Tim Green. Last year I got him The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind and he loved it. Thank you!! -Kendal 6. I would like to find a cozy Christmas read. I’m down for any genre, though if it is romance, I would prefer a WLW if possible. It’s not something I have come across before, but Christmas is my favorite time of year. Any help for this Christmas nerd/bookworm?  -Beth 7. **Response before Christmas** 🤷🏻‍♀️ Hi All, This is my favorite podcast. I’m looking for a book for my husband. He’s not a reader, but he likes mysteries. When he was younger he read Sherlock Holmes and LOTR (that’s the only books he can name for me). He said I could buy him a mystery and I need help. I obviously got really excited. He doesn’t want it to be long (maybe a novella or under 300 pages. I have no idea if there are novella mysteries). He also said it’s be okay if it might be a little sci-fi. We like Doctor Who, Star Wars and started watching Stargate recently. He doesn’t want it to be a Star Wars story or Doctor Who story. He said he might be interested in Agatha Christie because he liked the movie Murder on the Orient Express. He’s giving me a lot of ideas but I obviously have no idea where to start. Any help you can give me would be awesome!  -Mikala Books Discussed The Line Becomes a River by Francisco Cantu The Answer Is by Alex Trebek Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir The Poppy War series by R.F. Kuang (ALL THE TRIGGER WARNINGS) Humankind by Rutger Bregman transl Elizabeth Manton and Erica Moore Braiding Sweetgrass, the gift edition, by Robin Wall Kimmerer, illustrated by Nate Christopherson The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Stephen Brusatte Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars by Kate Greene Reaching for the Moon by Katherine G. Johnson Outcasts United by Warren St. John (mention of violence against women and children) Written in the Stars by Alexandria Bellefleur Mangos and Mistletoe by Adriana Herrera Resurrection Bay by Emma Viskic A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas (tw: child abuse, sexual assault) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
40 min
How to Decorate
How to Decorate
Ballard Designs
Ep. 173: designer Joyce Downing Pickens
Our guest this week is the founder of Los Angeles-based design firm JDP Interiors, Joyce Downing Pickens. She is the primary designer, and her work has been featured in the LA Times, Elle Décor, domino, and many more. We talk about her effortless design which features a California style mixed with a rustic English cottage look. Joyce gives us tips on bookcases and built-in stylings and other ways to make your space unique. What You’ll Hear on This Episode: Trials & Triumphs about over power washing a deck, hurricane debris, packing for a move and 4 days without power. Joyce has a varied style that is often a meld of her aesthetic mixed with her clients’ desires. How Joyce describes the California style; laid back, rustic textures, linens, etc. Joyce leans towards using a cream or a richer white rather than pure white to add depth. Joyce has a quirky loft in her home that she managed to turn into a cozy lounge/sleeping space. Ways to make a builder's home seem unique like trims, furniture and collectibles. Styling bookcases and built-ins are difficult but so important; Joyce shares some tips. What design changes Joyce has made, or wants to make, during the pandemic. The go-tos Joyce likes to use on projects (plants!) and when she entertains. When to use sconces vs. a table lamp. Joyce had a project in San Francisco with huge windows and few walls; how she designed for this. Finding a designer as you’re house shopping, or building, will save a lot of headaches. How Joyce was able to design with intention (and velvet) in another space with floor-to-ceiling windows. Mentioned In This Episode: Joyce Downing Pickens on Instagram JDP Interiors Decorating Dilemma Hi Susan, The long skinny room is hard! The best thing you can do is what you’ve almost already done; break it up into two or three places. There is a lot going on, so try to think of those designated spaces and what you’d really like to achieve. Think of that center point as a place to have an entry center console table or an area with a daybed by the fireplace (see some examples from Jeremiah Brent and Nate Berkus). You could also use a bigger sofa in here; maybe on the left side that wraps in front of the window. Walking out of the kitchen area into two chairs could help break that up, but I understand wanting to be able to look out the window…this is not an easy room! Window treatments on the far left could really help warm up the room and finish it; think about them as the eyebrows to the room! I would do Roman shades on the double hung windows and either skip one on the sliding door or put a drape. Window treatments will overall give some height to this room. A standing tree or lamp could also help with height. I wouldn’t do a custom area rug for the whole room; use three rugs, that sort of tie together, to designate the different areas. Some vintage Turkish rugs that pair well together, but aren’t the same, I think would look great. We all agree that there are too many seating arrangements; you should really try for one big, focal seating arrangement. Maybe an L-shaped sofa with a chair; you could break up the “blockiness” by finding a chair with legs. Then you can have the chaise lounge in front of the fireplace. Then another seating area in the space you walk right out of. I even think you could make that a substantial dining area right by the kitchen instead of pushing the table into the corner; when you have guests over you can look out onto the water. The room is a little too piece-y now; I like to mix two different types of furniture but never more than that. One other thing you might want to consider is a floating desk; either where the table is now or in the kitchen nook. Both ways you can look out onto the sea. -Joyce The Ballard Design Room Planner would be really helpful here! It’s a beautiful room! Please send us some photos and then invite us over for that wine!
1 hr 9 min
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