Culture Matters
Culture Matters
Jun 18, 2019
Love Refugees as Yourself
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The Adams dive into things like how refugees are different than migrants, how this all relates to God’s heart for the vulnerable and what our role is as the people of God.

As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
What’s at Stake?: Gospel Opportunities and Implications
In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Mike Aitcheson welcome Soong Chan-Rah to discuss reclaiming the church from cultural captivity and the specific ways that Western attitudes of individualism have crept into our modern ministry philosophies. Rah shares insights regarding the ethics of the kingdom and paints a picture of hopes and dreams for the future. Rah focuses on the positive gospel opportunities in addressing race and justice with kingdom ethics. * An introduction to Soong Chan-Rah (:58) * Cultural shifts in objections to the gospel (2:54) * The significance of minority leadership in this shift (9:43) * The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church From Western Cultural Captivity (13:27) * “Captivity” in the conversation (17:11) * Advice for church leadership in these conversations (21:14) * “Aren’t we pas this now?” (28:10) * How important it is for the church to get this cultural moment right (33:55) * What happens when churches dismiss these cultural conversations (37:59) * The church’s two minute drill (42:44) * Hopeful realism (49:21) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * What are some biblical truths that the church stands by that you see the church as failing to live into? * What does it mean that we should embrace “the full biblical narrative”? In the arc of that narrative, which parts of the narrative do you see yourself latching on to more easily? * What are ways that the church has gone into “captivity” to western values? What are ways you have seen this in our bible reading? In our community life? In Christian engagements with social issues? * What are ways that we can remember the sins of our past corporately in regard to how the church has engaged with minority racial groups? What gospel hope does Jesus offer in our remembering? * What are your hopes for the future of the Western Church? How do you hope to see the church embrace values that are biblical, rather than cultural? What would that look like for your local church?
53 min
Read the Bible
Read the Bible
The Gospel Coalition, D. A. Carson
January 23 – Vol. 2
One of the most striking evidences of sinful human nature lies in the universal propensity for downward drift. In other words, it takes thought, resolve, energy, and effort to bring about reform. In the grace of God, sometimes human beings display such virtues. But where such virtues are absent, the drift is invariably toward compromise, comfort, indiscipline, sliding disobedience, and decay that advances, sometimes at a crawl and sometimes at a gallop, across generations. People do not drift toward holiness. Apart from grace-driven effort, people do not gravitate toward godliness, prayer, obedience to Scripture, faith, and delight in the Lord. We drift toward compromise and call it tolerance; we drift toward disobedience and call it freedom; we drift toward superstition and call it faith. We cherish the indiscipline of lost self-control and call it relaxation; we slouch toward prayerlessness and delude ourselves into thinking we have escaped legalism; we slide toward godlessness and convince ourselves we have been liberated. That is the sort of situation Nehemiah faces toward the end of his leadership in Jerusalem (Neh. 13). He has been away for a time, required by his responsibilities toward the Emperor Artaxerxes to return to the capital. When he comes back to Jerusalem for a second term as governor, he finds that commercial interests have superseded Sabbath discipline, that compromise with the surrounding pagans has displaced covenantal faithfulness, that greed has withheld some of the stipend of the clergy, and therefore their numbers and usefulness have been reduced, and that some combination of indiscipline and sheer stupidity has admitted to the temple and to the highest councils of power men like Tobiah and Sanballat, who have no interest in faithfulness toward God and his Word. By an extraordinary combination of exhortation, command, and executive action, Nehemiah restores covenantal discipline. Doubtless many of the godly breathe a sigh of relief and thank God for him; no less certainly, many others grumble that he is a busybody, a killjoy, a narrow-minded legalist. Our permissive and relativizing culture fits more comfortably into the latter group than the former—but that says more about our culture than about Nehemiah. Genuine reformation and revival have never occurred in the church apart from leaders for whom devotion to God is of paramount importance. If, absorbing the values of the ambient culture, the Western church becomes suspicious of such leaders, or else reacts with knee-jerk cultural conservatism that is as devoid of biblical integrity as the compromise it opposes, we are undone. May God have mercy on us and send us prophetic leaders. _This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan._
3 min
Gospelbound
Gospelbound
The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen
Russell Moore: How to Stand When the World Is Falling
If I want to read anyone’s reflections on recent years, it’s Russell Moore. The president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the SBC hasn’t been as visible or vocal as he was before 2017, at least until the last week following the attack on the U.S. Capitol. But his newest book, _The Courage to Stand: Facing Your Fear Without Losing Your Soul_, published by B&H, is even better than a tell-all memoir. It’s a grace-infused reflection on where and how to stand tall when it feels like the world is going to crush you. Moore says, “The courage to stand is the courage to be crucified.” Indeed, Jesus sets the tone for this book. And if you’re going to worship and follow a Savior who submitted to the cross, you’re not going to follow the world’s typical mode of courage. I see this book as seeking to reclaim Jesus, or at least his reputation and authority, among evangelicals. Moore observes, “An entire generation is watching what goes on under the name of American religion, wondering if there is something real to it, or if it is just another useful tool to herd people, to elect allies, to make money.” Elsewhere he writes, “I’m not surprised now when I see Jesus used as a mascot to prop up some identity politics or power agenda, or even to cover up private immorality or public injustice.” We’ve seen that recently with the Jericho March, and then the protests-turned-attack at the Capitol. Moore joins me on Gospelbound to tell us what scares him, how to lead when no one seems to be following, ambition masquerading as conviction, and much more. This episode of Gospelbound is sponsored by The Good Book Company, publisher of _Meals with Jesus _by Ed Drew. These simple 10-minute family devotions in Luke’s Gospel explore Jesus’ character through nine meals that he shared with people. More information at thegoodbook.com.
50 min
Life and Books and Everything
Life and Books and Everything
Kevin DeYoung, Collin Hansen, Justin Taylor
Division, Whataboutism, & Christian Nationalism
Why is it so hard to acknowledge when our opponents get something right? Or to admit when we are wrong? Why do so few people see that BOTH this issue AND that issue can be right or wrong? Collin, Justin, and Kevin discuss these divisions that we experience on this episode. They also ask, “What is Christian Nationalism?” Listen to the end for the book recommendations and scroll down for the links.  Life and Books and Everything is sponsored by Crossway, publisher of the Short Studies in Biblical Theology Series, edited by Dane C. Ortlund and Miles V. Van Pelt.   The Short Studies in Biblical Theology Series is designed to help readers see the whole Bible as a unified story culminating in Jesus Christ. In each volume, a trusted scholar traces an important topic through God’s word and explores its significance for the Christian life.  For 30% off this series and all other books and Bibles at Crossway, sign up for a free Crossway+ account at crossway.org/LBE.  Timestamps:  The Best Person to Disagree With [0:00 – 1:46]  Collin’s Jolly Holiday [1:46 – 4:17]  A Brief Digression on Morally Problematic Television [4:17 – 7:34]  Justin’s COVID Christmas [7:34 – 10:53]  VidAngel & Cobra Kai [10:53 – 12:15]  Kevin’s December Viewing [12:15 – 17:45]  Both/And: Why is it so hard to see both sides of an issue? [17:45 – 25:54]  Both/And: Should we even want this approach? [25:54 – 35:23]  Whataboutism & Selective Policing [35:23 – 40:57]  Christian Nationalism [40:57 – 56:16]  Book Recommendations Featuring Pro-Life and MLK, Jr. Topics [56:16 – 1:08:25]  Books and More Books:  The Case for Life: Equipping Christians to Engage the Culture, by Scott Klusendorf  Defending Life, by Francis J. Beckwith  Beyond Racial Gridlock: Embracing Mutual Responsibility, by George Yancey  Letter from a Birmingham Jail, by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times, by David S. Reynolds  The Attributes of God: An Introduction, by Gerald Bray  Forty Questions About the End Times, by Eckhard Schnabel  The Bible and the Future, by Anthony A. Hoekema  Not Tragically Colored: Freedom, Personhood, and the Renewal of Black America, by Ismael Hernandez  America in the King Years, by Taylor Branch  Abuse of Discretion: The Inside Story of Roe v. Wade, by Clarke D. Forsythe  Concise Guide to Conservatism, by Russell Kirk  The Myth of the Lost Cause: Why the South Fought the Civil War and Why the North Won, by Edward H. Bonekemper, III  Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theologian, Confessional Presbyterian, by Danny E. Olinger  Make Time: How to Focus on What Matters Every Day, by Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky  Heralds of the King: Christ-Centered Sermons in the Tradition of Edmund P. Clowney, edited by Dennis E. Johnson  For Christ and the University: The Story of InterVarsity Christian Fellowship of the USA - 1940-1990, by Keith Hunt, Gladys Hunt  C. Stacey Woods and the Evangelical Rediscovery of the University, by A. Donald MacLeod  Moral, Believing Animals: Human Personhood and Culture, by Christian Smith  Confronting Injustice without Compromising Truth: 12 Questions Christians Should Ask About Social Justice, by Thaddeus J. Williams  Minds Wide Shut: How the New Fundamentalisms Divide Us, by Gary Saul Morson and Morton Schapiro  R. C. Sproul: A Life, by Stephen J. Nichols
1 hr 8 min
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