Culture Matters
Culture Matters
Feb 12, 2019
A Woke Church?
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This episode takes a deep dive into the topic of race. We talk with Eric Mason about his new book, Woke Church, and Amy Julia Becker about her new book, White Picket Fences.

As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
What’s at Stake?: Gospel Opportunities and Implications
In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Mike Aitcheson welcome Soong Chan-Rah to discuss reclaiming the church from cultural captivity and the specific ways that Western attitudes of individualism have crept into our modern ministry philosophies. Rah shares insights regarding the ethics of the kingdom and paints a picture of hopes and dreams for the future. Rah focuses on the positive gospel opportunities in addressing race and justice with kingdom ethics. * An introduction to Soong Chan-Rah (:58) * Cultural shifts in objections to the gospel (2:54) * The significance of minority leadership in this shift (9:43) * The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church From Western Cultural Captivity (13:27) * “Captivity” in the conversation (17:11) * Advice for church leadership in these conversations (21:14) * “Aren’t we pas this now?” (28:10) * How important it is for the church to get this cultural moment right (33:55) * What happens when churches dismiss these cultural conversations (37:59) * The church’s two minute drill (42:44) * Hopeful realism (49:21) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * What are some biblical truths that the church stands by that you see the church as failing to live into? * What does it mean that we should embrace “the full biblical narrative”? In the arc of that narrative, which parts of the narrative do you see yourself latching on to more easily? * What are ways that the church has gone into “captivity” to western values? What are ways you have seen this in our bible reading? In our community life? In Christian engagements with social issues? * What are ways that we can remember the sins of our past corporately in regard to how the church has engaged with minority racial groups? What gospel hope does Jesus offer in our remembering? * What are your hopes for the future of the Western Church? How do you hope to see the church embrace values that are biblical, rather than cultural? What would that look like for your local church?
53 min
Read the Bible
Read the Bible
The Gospel Coalition, D. A. Carson
January 27 – Vol. 2
For narrative simplicity and power, the book of Esther readily captures the imagination. Though by now we are three chapters into it, we can pick up something of both its flavor and its message by reflecting on selected elements of Esther 4. (1) The book makes its profound theological points by the shape of its restrained narrative. Commentators never fail to observe that not once does the book explicitly mention God. Nevertheless, it says a great deal about God and his providence, about his protection of his covenant people (even when they are far from the land, learning to survive during the exile and throughout the Diaspora), and about their faith in him, even when they are horribly threatened. (2) The book thus gradually leads us to reflect on the strange circumstances that bring Esther to succeed Vashti as queen, as the consort of the Emperor Xerxes. If the point is overlooked by the careless reader, the chapter before us makes it pretty obvious to all but the most obtuse. “And who knows but that you have come to royal position for such a time as this?” (4:14), Mordecai asks Esther by the hand of Hathach. Mordecai is not appealing to impersonal fate; he is a devout and pious Jew. But the form of his utterance emphasizes God’s sovereign providence even while implicitly acknowledging that providence is hard to read. God’s people must act responsibly, wisely, strategically in light of the circumstances that play out around them, knowing that God is in control. (3) Even while Mordecai mourns and wails deeply when he discovers Haman’s plot (Esther 4:1–3), he neither descends into fatalism nor loses his faith. Having had time to mull over the wretched threat to his people, he reaches the conclusion (as he puts it to Esther) that, “For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish” (Esther 4:14). Granted that God is faithful to his covenant promises, Mordecai cannot conceive that he would permit the people of God to be destroyed. (4) True to her upbringing by Mordecai, Esther simultaneously expresses confidence in the living God and avoids the presumption that God’s purposes for her life are easy to infer. She knows that God is there and that he hears and answers importunate prayer. “Go, gather together all the Jews who are in Susa [the capital city], and fast for me. Do not eat or drink for three days, night or day. I and my maids will fast as you do.… And if I perish, I perish” (Esther 4:16). While she resolves to do what is right, she acknowledges that she cannot see her own future and commits herself to the grace of God. _This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan._
3 min
Quick to Listen
Quick to Listen
Christianity Today
How American Evangelicals Lost Credibility with the Global Church
“Was the US never really a “Christian country,” or was US Christianity corrupted by politics?”That’s the question that Kylie Beach, a writer for the Australian-based Eternity News asked several days after the capitol insurrection and several days before last week’s presidential inauguration. She continued: Did the US only ever appear to be more Christian than other countries, or was its Christianity corrupted by politics? To put it frankly, are the people who declare themselves to be Christians in the US really just ‘cultural Christians’ – people who are ethnically descended from nations where Christianity was the primary religion? Or people who have taken on the outward form of their grandparent’s faith? Have they ever actually had a moment of conversion where they have decided to accept Christ as their Lord and Saviour? Do they read their Bibles to try to learn what God is like? Do they pray and listen for his direction? Beach isn’t the only Christian from around the world asking what to make of US evangelicals after Trump. At the UK’s Evangelical Alliance executive director Gavin Cavler wrote a column for the Times with the headline, "Let us redefine evangelism after the Trump presidency." He wrote that the word evangelical has become politicized and toxic even in the UK because of Trump politics. René Breuel is the pastor of Hopera, an evangelical church in Rome and has served as a student leader in International Fellowship of Evangelical Students movements in Brazil, Germany, Canada, and Italy. He is also the author of The Paradox of Happiness. Breuel joined global media manager Morgan Lee and editorial director Ted Olsen to discuss how non-US evangelicals saw American evangelicals before Trump, what has changed over the past four years, and what American evangelicals who want to regain this trust must do moving forward. What is Quick to Listen? Read more Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow our hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Follow our guest on Twitter: René Breuel Music by Sweeps Quick to Listen is produced by Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Yvonne Su and Bunmi Ishola Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 7 min
Revived Thoughts
Revived Thoughts
revivedthoughts
Charles Spurgeon: The Good Samaritan
Troy and Joel got to interview the current curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary and ask him about Charles Spurgeon's life. Dr. Geoff Chang of the Spurgeon Library did a wonderful job telling us about Spurgeon's life and also narrated this week's episode of Revived Thoughts (he also selected the sermon!). The stories about Spurgeon's time at the orphanage are a must listen! **Make sure to watch the full video on our Facebook page or on our website! Links below** This sermon from Charles Spurgeon challenges us to look at the story of the Good Samaritan and really ask ourselves if we would do what he did. Spurgeon calls out the tough conditions of his time. Check out the Spurgeon Library and the work they are doing by bringing Spurgeon's last sermons out to the public. You can click the link here to learn more about them. We are now partnered with ServeNow! If you would like to give to their ministry that gives bikes to pastors in rural areas around the world so that they can spread the Gospel, please check out their website and their new book: Hope Rising. If you'd like to join the premium team go to our Patreon If you'd like to narrate a sermon, send us an email at revivedthoughts@gmail.com And if you enjoy the show, sharing with friends and a 5 star rating on Apple Podcasts! Facebook Instagram MeWe Twitter Youtube Revived Thoughts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
1 hr 2 min
Gospelbound
Gospelbound
The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen
Russell Moore: How to Stand When the World Is Falling
If I want to read anyone’s reflections on recent years, it’s Russell Moore. The president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the SBC hasn’t been as visible or vocal as he was before 2017, at least until the last week following the attack on the U.S. Capitol. But his newest book, _The Courage to Stand: Facing Your Fear Without Losing Your Soul_, published by B&H, is even better than a tell-all memoir. It’s a grace-infused reflection on where and how to stand tall when it feels like the world is going to crush you. Moore says, “The courage to stand is the courage to be crucified.” Indeed, Jesus sets the tone for this book. And if you’re going to worship and follow a Savior who submitted to the cross, you’re not going to follow the world’s typical mode of courage. I see this book as seeking to reclaim Jesus, or at least his reputation and authority, among evangelicals. Moore observes, “An entire generation is watching what goes on under the name of American religion, wondering if there is something real to it, or if it is just another useful tool to herd people, to elect allies, to make money.” Elsewhere he writes, “I’m not surprised now when I see Jesus used as a mascot to prop up some identity politics or power agenda, or even to cover up private immorality or public injustice.” We’ve seen that recently with the Jericho March, and then the protests-turned-attack at the Capitol. Moore joins me on Gospelbound to tell us what scares him, how to lead when no one seems to be following, ambition masquerading as conviction, and much more. This episode of Gospelbound is sponsored by The Good Book Company, publisher of _Meals with Jesus _by Ed Drew. These simple 10-minute family devotions in Luke’s Gospel explore Jesus’ character through nine meals that he shared with people. More information at thegoodbook.com.
50 min
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