Culture Matters
Culture Matters
Oct 19, 2020
Political Compassion and Conviction With Justin Giboney
33 min

As we prepare for the upcoming election, we have another conversation about faith and politics. Attorney, political strategist and president of the And Campaign Justin Giboney joins us to talk about political compassion and conviction.

As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
Some Unique Challenges Facing Black Women
Jim Davis and Justin Holcomb welcome Trillia Newbell to talk about some of the unique relational dynamics facing black women. Newbell covers being racially profiled as well as many false stereotypes and the exhaustion that black women face as they navigate others’ expectations and perceptions. Newbell shares that the painful or awkward moments in the world also exist in the church, yet there is hope that springs out of lament, having faith in a good God. The three discuss: * An introduction to Trillia Newbell (1:02) * Coming to faith in a “holiday Christian” home (2:18) * Common challenges Black women face in our culture (6:45) * Picking her battles (9:53) * Facing down unfair assumptions (13:19) * False stereotypes of Black women (17:51) * Stereotypes mirrored in the church (23:58) * A Christian response to stereotypes (28:42) * Parenting through racial stereotypes (33:15) * _Creative God, Colorful Us_ (36:35) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * Have you ever caught yourself thinking of any of the stereotypes of black women in your mind? * What kind of emotions come to mind if other people judged a whole group of people by your individual speech, personality, or actions? * Were you surprised that all of the same awkward or painful moments experienced outside the church were also experienced inside the church? Why or why not? * Can you imagine the cumulative weight of the expectations, stereotypes, perceptions, and awkward or painful interactions over time? If yes, what does it feel like? Books referenced in this episode: * _God’s Very Good Idea_ by Trillia Newbell * _Creative God, Colorful Us__ _by Trillia Newbell * _United: Captured By God’s Vision for Diversity__ _by Trillia Newbell * _Sacred Endurance: Finding Grace and Strength for a Lasting Faith_ by Trillia Newbell
56 min
Quick to Listen
Quick to Listen
Christianity Today
Why We Can’t Stop Talking about Hillsong's Celebrity Pastors
Transcribed highlights of the show can be found in our episode summaries. At the beginning of this month, Hillsong NYC pastor Carl Lentz was fired. A day after the news went public, he posted a picture of his family on Instagram admitting he was unfaithful in his marriage. Both before and after the news, Lentz made headlines across Christian and secular media for his popularity and successful ministry—as well as the “hipster” pastor look he popularized. When Lentz co-founded Hillsong NYC with Joel Houston in 2010, the church drew lines around the block and caught the eye of A-list celebrities, none more famous than Justin Bieber. Lentz, who became famous for his wire-rimmed glasses, plunging V-necks, and designer sneakers, himself became subject of a number of profiles, including this 2015 GQ feature from Taffy Brodesser-Akner: “The music! The lights! The crowds!” begins an incredulous woman narrating a CNN segment on Hillsong NYC . “It looks like a rock concert.” The chyron reads “Hipster preacher smashes stereotypes.” They call Pastor Carl a hipster. Carl says he doesn’t know what that means, and he wears a motorcycle jacket when he says this.Pastor Joel is unwilling to acknowledge that there’s something going on here. Yes, he tells me, sure, he likes clothes. But that’s the end of it. I should ask Pastor Carl about the clothes, he tells me. What Pastor Carl does, he says—that’s intentional, and then he laughs. This week on Quick to Listen, we wanted to discuss the attention around a new generation of fashion-forward pastors. What does it reveal about ministry? But what does our fascination with this aesthetic reveal more broadly about the American and Western church? Anthropologist Katherine Ajibade, formerly a researcher with the British think tank Theos, joins CT’s Morgan Lee and Kate Shellnutt. What is Quick to Listen? Read more Rate Quick to Listen on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Twitter Follow our hosts on Twitter: Morgan Lee and Ted Olsen Follow Katherine Ajibade on Twitter Music by Sweeps Quick to Listen is produced by Morgan Lee and Matt Linder The transcript is edited by Bunmi Ishola Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
59 min
Gospelbound
Gospelbound
Collin Hansen, The Gospel Coalition
The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self
A recent article in _New York Magazine_ included this bombshell, "Roughly 30% of American women under 25 identify as LGBT. For women over 60, that figure is less than 5%." Now, I can't find anyone who believes this number can really be that high. To acknowledge such a dramatic shift in such a short period of time would be nothing short of a world changing revolution. But, we know about rapid onset gender dysphoria among adolescents and teens. We've seen the prevalence of social contagion in our Instagram age. So, is such a revolution in human sexuality so unthinkable? This revolution may be sudden if it's actually happening, but it's no more dramatic than what we've seen unfold in the west in the last 60 years. Historian, Carl Trueman covers that ground in his new book, _The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution,_ published by Crossway. But, he locates the sexual revolution within a broader change in views of the self and identity. Trueman joins me in this special extended episode of Gospelbound, to help church leaders understand what's happening. I've heard Carl say that apologetics used to be about explaining the church to the world, but now it's more about explaining the world to the church. That's what he does in _The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self_, which is my pick for the most important book published in 2020. I'm eager to learn more about this road to revolution, and also pose some of our listeners' questions on this subject. This episode of Gospelbound is sponsored by Crossway, publisher of _The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution_ by Carl Trueman.
57 min
Pass The Mic
Pass The Mic
The Witness
Becoming Brave with Dr. Brenda Salter Mcneil
What a special guest we have on the podcast today! If you are familiar with the conversation about reconciliation and justice in the church, you won’t get very far without hearing the name, the Rev. Dr. Brenda Salter Mcneil.  Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil is a dynamic speaker, author, professor and reconciliation thought leader. Her mission is to inspire, equip and empower the next generation of Christian leaders to be practitioners of reconciliation.   Dr. Brenda is an international trailblazer, leading individuals, communities, and organizations to biblical reconciliation. She was featured as one of the 50 most influential women to watch by Christianity Today in 2012.   She is the author of Roadmap to Reconciliation 2.0, A Credible Witness: Reflections on Power, Evangelism and Race (2008), and The Heart of Racial Justice: How Soul Change Leads to Social Change (2005), coauthored with Rick Richardson. Her newest book Becoming Brave: Finding the Courage to Pursue Racial Justice Now is available August 2020. Becoming Brave offers a distinctly Christian framework for addressing systemic injustice. It challenges Christians to be everyday activists who become brave enough to break the silence and work with others to dismantle systems of injustice and inequality. Looking through the lens of the biblical narrative of Esther, McNeil challenges Christian reconcilers to recognize the particular pain in our world so they can work together to repair what is broken while maintaining a deep hope in God’s ongoing work for justice. This book provides education and prophetic inspiration for every person who wants to take reconciliation seriously.
58 min
Theology in the Raw
Theology in the Raw
Preston Sprinkle
#829 - A Conversation about Race and Evangelicalism: BJ Thompson
BJ and I sat down to have a conversation with no agenda in mind. We start by talking about his work as a life-coach and leader at #BuildaBetterUs, we quickly move into talking about church, church structure, and money. Then, we move into talking about the topic of race in Evangelicalism and we pretty much camped out there for the rest of the time. Some of the things we talked about were: - The reason why black millennials are leaving the Reformed and SBC church - How we should think about Christian "greats" like Jonathan Edwards who owned slaves - What about MLK's misogyny?  - How why evangelicals can truly love and serve their black brothers and sisters BJ is a life coach, speaker, and author who helped launch one of the largest faith movements in recent history – the “116 Movement” with Grammy award winning artist Lecrae. He also served alongside Bryan Loritts to expand groundbreaking racial reconciliation work in Memphis, TN.  BJ has worked with tens of thousands of individuals and couples all over the world helping them experience personal and relational growth. Currently BJ serves as the executive director for Build a Better Us. He has a bachelor’s degree in sociology from the University of North Texas and a master’s degree in Christian studies from Union University. He has been featured in Relevant Magazine, Propel, Christianity Today, Barna, & other publications. He has also worked with History Chanel, RZIM, ERLC, Desiring God, Universities & other corporations. He and his wife Vanja have been married 16 years and live in Atlanta with their three children. Watch this episode of the podcast on YouTube Connect with Preston Twitter | @PrestonSprinkle Instagram | @preston.sprinkle Youtube | Preston Sprinkle Check out his website prestonsprinkle.com If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review.
Search
Clear search
Close search
Google apps
Main menu