Culture Matters
Culture Matters
Sep 28, 2020
Family Discipleship in 2020
Play • 41 min

Adam Griffin talks with Adam and Elizabeth about the new book he wrote with Matt Chandler called Family Discipleship. We chat about the challenges and opportunities of raising kids in 2020.

As In Heaven
As In Heaven
The Gospel Coalition
What’s at Stake?: Gospel Opportunities and Implications
In this episode of As In Heaven, hosts Jim Davis and Mike Aitcheson welcome Soong Chan-Rah to discuss reclaiming the church from cultural captivity and the specific ways that Western attitudes of individualism have crept into our modern ministry philosophies. Rah shares insights regarding the ethics of the kingdom and paints a picture of hopes and dreams for the future. Rah focuses on the positive gospel opportunities in addressing race and justice with kingdom ethics. * An introduction to Soong Chan-Rah (:58) * Cultural shifts in objections to the gospel (2:54) * The significance of minority leadership in this shift (9:43) * The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church From Western Cultural Captivity (13:27) * “Captivity” in the conversation (17:11) * Advice for church leadership in these conversations (21:14) * “Aren’t we pas this now?” (28:10) * How important it is for the church to get this cultural moment right (33:55) * What happens when churches dismiss these cultural conversations (37:59) * The church’s two minute drill (42:44) * Hopeful realism (49:21) Explore more from TGC on the topic of race.DISCUSSION QUESTIONS: * What are some biblical truths that the church stands by that you see the church as failing to live into? * What does it mean that we should embrace “the full biblical narrative”? In the arc of that narrative, which parts of the narrative do you see yourself latching on to more easily? * What are ways that the church has gone into “captivity” to western values? What are ways you have seen this in our bible reading? In our community life? In Christian engagements with social issues? * What are ways that we can remember the sins of our past corporately in regard to how the church has engaged with minority racial groups? What gospel hope does Jesus offer in our remembering? * What are your hopes for the future of the Western Church? How do you hope to see the church embrace values that are biblical, rather than cultural? What would that look like for your local church?
53 min
Gospelbound
Gospelbound
Collin Hansen, The Gospel Coalition
Russell Moore: How to Stand When the World Is Falling
If I want to read anyone’s reflections on recent years, it’s Russell Moore. The president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the SBC hasn’t been as visible or vocal as he was before 2017, at least until the last week following the attack on the U.S. Capitol. But his newest book, _The Courage to Stand: Facing Your Fear Without Losing Your Soul_, published by B&H, is even better than a tell-all memoir. It’s a grace-infused reflection on where and how to stand tall when it feels like the world is going to crush you. Moore says, “The courage to stand is the courage to be crucified.” Indeed, Jesus sets the tone for this book. And if you’re going to worship and follow a Savior who submitted to the cross, you’re not going to follow the world’s typical mode of courage. I see this book as seeking to reclaim Jesus, or at least his reputation and authority, among evangelicals. Moore observes, “An entire generation is watching what goes on under the name of American religion, wondering if there is something real to it, or if it is just another useful tool to herd people, to elect allies, to make money.” Elsewhere he writes, “I’m not surprised now when I see Jesus used as a mascot to prop up some identity politics or power agenda, or even to cover up private immorality or public injustice.” We’ve seen that recently with the Jericho March, and then the protests-turned-attack at the Capitol. Moore joins me on Gospelbound to tell us what scares him, how to lead when no one seems to be following, ambition masquerading as conviction, and much more.
50 min
Knowing Faith
Knowing Faith
Training The Church
#98 – The Mega Q&A Episode
We go over the following questions: * When you say that we’re asking Genesis questions that it’s not asking itself...is that literal? How would I apply that to other books of the Bible? * How would you describe/define the imago dei in light of disability? * Who’s your favorite person to talk theology with other than each other? * New ESV translation of Genesis 3:16? * When was the promise of the land fulfilled in the Abrahamic Covenant? Was it fulfilled during David or Solomon’s reign? * If God is the one who gives faith, and He wishes that none should perish-why doesn’t He give the gift of faith to everyone? * How do you strike a balance between reading the Bible and Christian books or books about the bible? * When is it ok to leave a church? * What are some practical tips for starting a theological program for women at your church? * What did you think about the West Wing reunion? * Could you explain the doctrine of the sufficiency of scripture? * What are your favorite hymns? * Do you think God made another world before this one? * What is discipleship and how/where does discipleship happen? What does it mean to make disciples? * Is doubt a sin? * What advice do you give to someone just starting out as pastor? * If you could have a table discussion with any 3 theologians, past or present, who would be at your table? Don't forget to support the show and have access to merch, monthly newsletters, behind-the-scenes, and more at Patreon.com/KnowingFaith Follow us on social media on Instagram @knowingfaithpodcast, Twitter @KnowingFaithPod, and on Facebook at Knowing Faith.
1 hr 1 min
Theology in the Raw
Theology in the Raw
Preston Sprinkle
#839 - Thinking Christianly about Immigration: Dr. Danny Carroll
What does the Bible—not culture, not democrats, not republicans, but the freakin’ word of God!—say about immigration? In this podcast, Danny and Preston sit down to talk about what the Bible says about immigration, including how to respond to undocumented immigrants, and also how this intersects with politics and culture on the issue.  Dr. Carroll is half-Guatemalan and was raised bilingual and bicultural. In his youth, he spent many summers in Guatemala and later taught at El Seminario Teológico Centroamericano in Guatemala City for thirteen years. The realities of Central America sparked Dr. Carroll's fascination with the Old Testament. The relevance of the biblical text for the challenges of poverty, war, and politics in those developing countries led him to a passionate focus on Old Testament social ethics and the social sciences. In addition, his studies in English literature and literary theory have generated an ongoing engagement with literary approaches to the Old Testament and critical studies. Experiences in this country and abroad have led him to a deep appreciation for the unique contributions that ethnic minorities, women, and the global church make to the interpretation of the Old Testament. Before coming to Wheaton, Dr. Carroll taught Old Testament at Denver Seminary for many years and founded a Spanish-language lay training program there. At Wheaton, he hopes to model a commitment to connecting careful biblical scholarship with the mission of the church as it engages today’s complex realities. Dr. Carroll has been involved in Hispanic churches and teaching on the Bible and immigration for many years. His research focuses on the prophetic literature and Old Testament social ethics. He has just completed a major commentary on the book of Amos. Support Preston Support Preston by going to patreon.com Venmo: @Preston-Sprinkle-1 Connect with Preston Twitter | @PrestonSprinkle Instagram | @preston.sprinkle Youtube | Preston Sprinkle Check out his website prestonsprinkle.com If you enjoy the podcast, be sure to leave a review.
Play
Read the Bible
Read the Bible
The Gospel Coalition, D. A. Carson
January 15 – Vol. 2
When I was a high school student in Canada, I heard a story told by our history teacher. He related it with deadly anger. He had just returned from the battle-fields of World War II, where he had seen many of his friends killed. Furloughed home because of a war wound, he was riding a bus in a major Canadian city. Seated behind two prosperous-looking women, he overheard one of them say to the other, “I hope this war doesn’t end soon. We’ve never had it so good.” There are almost always people who profit from the disasters of others, not least from war. So it was in Nehemiah’s day (Neh. 5). Even while there was a disciplined effort to rebuild the city, in the surrounding countryside the fiscal pressures of the times, coupled with famine conditions, made the rich richer and the poor poorer. In an effort to keep going, the poor mortgaged their land and then lost it; they sold themselves or their families into slavery. From Nehemiah’s perspective, slavery was slavery; to be a slave to a fellow Jew was still to be a slave. In some ways it was worse: Nehemiah was concerned not only with the slavery itself, but with the moral hardness of the rich who were profiting from the bankruptcy of others—the want of compassion, the failure to obey the Mosaic code that forbade usury, the sheer covetousness and greed. Transparently they did not need more. Nor was this a question of buying off the lazy. What conceivable justification could they offer for such profiteering? Yet, mercifully, the consciences of these rich people were tender enough that they did not rebel when they were rebuked. “They kept quiet, because they could find nothing to say” (Neh. 5:8). Indeed, in due course they repented, returned what had been taken, and stopped charging interest to their brothers. Clearly one of the factors that enhanced Nehemiah’s credibility as he labored to bring about these reforms was his own conduct. Doubtless the vast majority of governors at the time used their positions of power to accumulate considerable wealth for themselves. Nehemiah refused to do so. He received, presumably from the central treasury, an ample stipend and sufficient support for himself and his staff, and he therefore declined to use his power to demand additional material support from the local population. Indeed, he ended up supporting many of them (Neh. 5:14–18). Obedience to God, compassion toward one’s fellows, consistency in the leadership, covenantal faithfulness that extends to one’s pocketbook, repentance and restoration where there has been either corruption or rapacity—these were values more important than the building of the wall. If the wall had been rebuilt without rebuilding the people, the triumph would have been small. _This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible). The podcast features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 2) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan._
3 min
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