Want Faster Compost? Here's How!
25 min

See how you can compost quicker on your homestead garden with these tips and tricks!

Mentioned in this episode:

Read all about Bokashi: The Composting Method You Are Probably Missing Out On here on the blog.

My Gardening Kit

My Homesteading Kit

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Always ensure to operate safely.  All projects are purely “at your own risk” and are for information purposes only. As with any project, unfamiliarity with the tools, animals, plants, and processes can be dangerous.  Posts, podcasts, and videos should be read and interpreted as theoretical advice only and are not a substitute for advice from a fully licensed professional.

The Thriving Farmer Podcast
The Thriving Farmer Podcast
Michael Kilpatrick
101. Adam and Jordan on Thriving Mycologically
Have you ever considered taking a completely different kind of farming journey? Adam Cohen and Jordan Jent join us today from Texas Fungus, hailing from Fort Worth and supplying all of Northern Texas. Jordan started Texas Fungus in the Fall of 2016 and now grows the most premium mushrooms in the area and beyond. The original farm began in a one-car garage and has since relocated to Arlington, TX in a 2,000 sq.ft. facility after Jordan partnered with Adam in January 2019. The farm has been expanding and thriving ever since. Join us to learn all about how they cultivate the best damn mushrooms in Texas! You’ll hear: How Jordan and Adam got started working with mushrooms 1:06 What makes growing mushrooms different from other crops 10:06 What a typical day at Texas Fungus looks like 11:45 How much time Jordan and Adam spend on the farm 16:41 How they prioritize important tasks 18:00 The most difficult thing they’ve encountered after starting their business 22:04 How Jordan and Adam advise learning about mushroom production to newcomers 29:38 How roles are divided on Texas Fungus 36:29 Which of their products sell best in Fort Worth and surrounding areas 50:26 What the whole growing process looks like 56:01 The biggest mistakes Adam and Jordan see newer farmers making 1.03:25 Their favorite farming tool 1.11:20 How Jordan and Adam feel about the prospect of starting a new farm today 1.15:53 Where you can learn more about Adam, Jordan, and Texas Fungus 1.19:36 What they’re currently doing with their grow kits 1.20:53 About the Guests: Adam Cohen is a former school teacher (Math, Science, Agriculture), who spent much of the last 15 years working with hydroponics and aquaponics. Struggling to find a way to balance the time needed to be an effective teacher with the needs of running a successful farm, Adam kept looking for ways to be more efficient and to do more with less. A chance meeting in late 2018 introduced him to Jordan Jent and the two partnered up to build Texas Fungus, a small artisan mushroom farm in the heart of the DFW Metroplex. Jent, a former Chef with a self-professed "black-thumb" had been growing mushrooms for a short time and was looking to find a way to bring a new connection to the DFW food-scene that had not existed in the area prior. Since January of 2019, Adam and Jordan have overcome a number of challenges and growing pains as they work to bring the #bestdamnmushrooms to DFW. In the fall of 2017, Jordan Jent received a mushroom kit as a gift that didn't fruit out. About that same time, he was also looking for a way out of the 9 to 5 corporate rat race. As a former chef, he still found himself looking for ways to be connected to the local DFW food scene. After the failed kit, Jordan stumbled upon mushroom growing and went down the rabbit hole. One year later in 2018, Jordan decided to go all-in and leave the simplicity of a 40-hour work week and good benefits for a life of mushroom farming, providing the #bestdamnmushroomsindfw to local chefs. After partnering up with Adam Cohen in the beginning of 2019, they expanded from 5 restaurants and 50lbs per week to 30+ restaurants and 250lbs per week by the end of 2019. Resources: Website - www.texasfungus.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/texasfungus/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/texas_fungus/
1 hr 25 min
Pantry Chat
Pantry Chat
Homesteading Family
How to Stock Your Barn for Winter
Winter should be a time for rest, relaxation and reflection, so the last thing you want to be doing is scrambling around trying to manage your homestead through the snow and ice and frigid temperatures.   In this episode of the Pantry Chat, Josh provides three core strategies to help you take stock of your winter needs, be more efficient and save money to make the overall management of your homestead easier and more enjoyable during the season.     *In this Episode* * Why stocking up your barn should be very similar to stocking up your pantry.  * The process of moving from pasture to indoors and the steps you’ll need to take to ensure your animals have everything they need.  * Why going week to week is so much more costly.  * Why doing your research today is critical and a good place to start to determine how much feed you’ll actually need.  * How much feed does an average cow consume and other feeding rules of thumbs for livestock?  * How to determine how much you need to buy in bulk and the different ways you can save on delivery.   * Why it’s a good idea to start keeping records of how much you’re buying and using.  * The importance of providing salt and minerals to keep your animals healthy during the winter months and why you need to determine what elements are lacking in your particular area.  * How to ensure your water supplies are adequate for your animals.  * Why the right bedding is so important for your barn and the benefits of using wood shavings over straw to manage the waste.  * Why your nose is a good indicator for determining how much bedding you need.  * What is “economy in motion” and does it matter where you put your feeders?  *Resources: * * MadeOn skin care products (use code “homesteadingfamily” for 15% off your purchase) * Follow Homesteading Family on Instagram * Follow Homesteading Family on Facebook
23 min
The Regenerative Journey with Charlie Arnott
The Regenerative Journey with Charlie Arnott
Charlie Arnott
Episode 20 | Matt Moran | The critically acclaimed chef who has his feet still firmly on farm.
Charlie sat with Matt Moran in his restaurant 'Chiswick' in Sydney overlooking his kitchen garden from which herbs and vegetables are harvested to supplement the dishes prepared in the kitchen. It's a great example of Matt's dedication to seasonality, accountability and authenticity in cooking, and highlights his connection to the source of his produce and the farmers which produce it. And being a farmer himself he has kept his feet firmly on the ground despite his successes and critical acclaim. To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group. Episode Takeaways : Chiswick, the restaurant Charlie interviewed Matt in, has a rich history, is one of the oldest restaurants in Sydney and was originally a soup kitchen for navy personnel | The Kitchen garden at Chiswick makes its chefs accountable for what’s in season and on the menu | Covid has bought out the best and the worst in people | Matt grew up near Tamworth in the mid 70s then moved to western suburbs of Sydney and still had connections to farming through his family’s farm at Taralga | Matt’s interest in food started in the home economics class at high school because there were 18 girls and only 2 boys in the class! | Started his career in the kitchen at Parramatta RSL | Searched for work in kitchens during early year 11 | First apprenticeship at La Belle Helene French fine dining in Roseville with Chef Michael de Laurence | He loved his work and was besotted with food | La belle Helene cooking technique and refinement | Matt's appreciation of quality was developed at Matt’s second job, at The Restaurant Manfredi - he learnt about the importance of quality produce | His first restaurant was The Paddington Inn 1991 and first chefs hat at age 23 in the same year | One of his secrets to success was to surrounded himself with people smarter than him | He opened ‘Moran’s’ in 1995 & various others before opening his signature restaurant Aria | Turning point was decision to expand to give others (his staff and associates) the opportunity to develop their skills and opportunities | Bruce Solomon is his business partner. It was important to bring different skills to the table. And brings a customers (Non chef) perspective | High stress industry that has a history of suicide | Legacy of working long hours and lack of support. Culture of perfectionism and ‘don’t share your troubles’ | More openness and support now | Rates of suicide and history is similar to farming world | Planning to build farm stay accommodation at his farm near Thurstan similar to Kimo Estate farm stay near Gundagai | Olive oil is best for flavouring not cooking, grape seed best for cooking! | Definitely rest steaks before serving! | Advice for chefs. Don’t do it for the fame and glory. Do it because you're passionate about it. Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life | Matt is a Thankful4farmers ambassador - it’s a charity raising funds through product partnerships to then grant funds to regenerative farmers and associated businesses to promote the uptake of technology, regenerative practices, and enhance community and farming family well being | Matt is a judge of the delicious produce awards | Australia has the best produce in world. Chefs and customers are spoilt for choice and variety of seed stock, such as the variety of heirloom seeds at Diggers gardening club | Whilst the industry is very competitive, chefs are very respectful, supportive and friendly to each other | If Matt could put a billboard near a highway for all to see, he would have the message ‘Be Kind’ on it… Episode Links : Matt Moran Kitchen Tales - Matt's new YouTube series, Nov 2020 Chiswick Restaurant - Sydney Manfredi Restaurant - Sydney Genevieve Copland - Hospitality Trainer and Assessor Aria Restaurant - Sydney Kimo Estate - Farm Stay and venue, Gundagai, NSW Thankful4Farmers - Matt is an ambassador Delicious Produce Awards Lord Dudley Hotel - Sydney Straight from the Source - an online platform where you can search, explore and connect with the source of your produce.
1 hr 27 min
Regenerative Agriculture Podcast
Regenerative Agriculture Podcast
John Kempf
Reversing Soil Degradation with Dwayne Beck
Dr. Dwayne Beck is well known for being one of the pioneers of no-till agriculture in central South Dakota and across the High Plains. For more than three decades, Dr. Beck has been creating comprehensive systems for both irrigated and dryland crop production throughout the region, educating growers on the power of crop rotation, diversity, and other regenerative practices. He currently serves as the Research Manager at the Dakota Lakes Research Farm, a non-profit made up of farmers committed to sustainable land practices. On today’s episode, John and Dwayne discuss: * Dwayne’s background and his earlier work assisting local growers with their irrigation systems * The continuing decline of the Ogallala Aquifer and how water infiltration can be improved by implementing no-till agricultural practices. * Addressing the often-overlooked aspects of irrigation, such as percolation and water delivery, and how it affects soil health. * Dwayne’s observations on lake bottom soils, the power of macropores, and the prevalence of summer fallowing in the High Plains. * Utilizing de-percolation strategies to maintain proper nutrient levels in your soil. * Using competition, sanitation, and rotation to control weeds, diseases and insects. * Dwayne’s historical research on nutrient cycling and fertilizer placement. * Dwayne offers up a broader historical perspective on how agriculture, human nature, and mother nature work together. * A discussion on why moving to no-till options for all crops including potatoes, carrots and sugar beets are engineering and genetics problems. * The shared vision, but much different methods, between regenerative agriculture vs. organic agriculture.
1 hr 16 min
Soil Sense
Soil Sense
NDSU Extension
The Importance of Extension with Dr. Greg Lardy
**Join us virtually at the DIRT Workshop December 8th - 9th: _www.DIRTWorkshopND.com_** Extension has a rich history in keeping producers informed and up to date. Dr. Greg Lardy has seen the growth and expansion of these programs and gives us insight into what makes the extension valuable and how it is adapting to the changing times. A beef cattle nutritionist by training, Dr. Lardy is currently the Vice President for Agricultural Affairs at North Dakota State University. In this capacity, he serves as the Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources; the Director of the NDSU Extension, and the Director of the North Dakota Experiment Station. So basically day-today he is tasked with managing all activities that relate to agriculture at NDSU. “How we deliver programs has changed, but the core mission of what we do in terms of using education to transform lives and help people see a better future and achieve a better future is really still at the very heart of what we do” - Dr. Greg Lardy Dr. Lardy remembers as a child visiting the extension building to find a wall of printed bulletins that producers could look through to find answers to their questions. Producers are now accessing internet sources to find these answers. Keeping research and information more readily accessible has been a priority for the extension program whether that be online, in person or in printed material. Beyond offering the information, Dr. Lardy also emphasizes the importance of creating measurable metrics to identify the efficacy of the information being shared. Going forward, Dr. Lardy sees the need for a continual and perpetual push for connectivity with producers and consumers. “Even though we are engaged right now with stakeholders, we've got to be more engaged with listening to the needs of our constituents and taxpayers out there. What are they saying? What do they need to help them live better lives across the state of North Dakota?” - Dr Greg Lardy This Week on Soil Sense: * Meet Dr. Greg Lardy, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources and the Director of the NDSU Extension * Explore the core mission of the Extension Program and what it offers producers * Discover how the program is continually evolving to be more accessible and stay relevant with producers and their needs. Connect with Soil Sense: * _Soil Sense Initiative _ Soil Sense Podcast is hosted by _Tim Hammerich_ of the _Future of Agriculture Podcast_.
22 min
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
Making Permaculture Stronger
David Holmgren’s Journey with Permaculture Design Process – Part Two (e54)
Welcome back to Part Two of a conversation with permaculture co-originator David Holmgren. In which David continues sharing significant milestones from his many decades as a practicing permaculture designer. Thanks to this project's wonderful patrons, I was once again able to have the audio professionally transcribed. The text below then received significant edits for clarity from patron Jon Buttery (thanks Jon!), myself, and most importantly David. Thanks also to David for kindly sharing relevant photos that help bring the text to life. Don't miss Part One if you haven't yet heard/read it, and given the quality of thinking David shares in this continuation, I hope you'll leave a comment. I anticipate a follow up conversation with David exploring questions and reflections from your comments, so please make the most of the opportunity. Finally, given this conversation again touches on the core skill of reading landscape, please check out and consider supporting the documentary film David, myself, and videographer Dave Meagher are currently endeavouring to bring into the world. Starting Holmgren Design Services Dan Palmer: All right. Well, here I am for the continuation of the discussion we started earlier. After a bit of a break, must have been, I don’t know, six weeks or something.    David Holmgren: Yeah. It’s been a busy time.  Dan Palmer: I’ll say! - a busy and very interesting time. It turned out the first recording was about an hour, and we got to the point where you'd started Holmgren Design Services, so that seems like a great place to start. You’d told us a lot about the project at your mother’s place in New South Wales and the learning you’d been doing from Hakai Tane about strategic planning, and then shrinking that down to apply to a site level. It’d be awesome to hear about the experience of moving into the space of permaculture design consultancy.    David Holmgren:  In 1983 I started a business and registered a business name. There were lot of things that were going on in my life, which I can also correlate with things that were happening in the wider world: that led me to getting serious earning a living, personal relationships, and also living in the city. The consultancy work I did, was primarily advising and designing for people who were moving onto rural properties; what these days people call a ‘tree-change’.   Consulting on a Central Victorian property in 2020 (as part of the Reading Landscape film project) That work fell into sort of two broad types. One-day verbal onsite advisory, walking around the property and suggesting things with clients. Then there was a more limited number of clients where I was providing reports and plans that gave me the opportunity to reflect. There were a lot of constraints on how to make a viable business in that, especially if your work wasn’t focused on affluent people, but instead empowering people who were going to get out and do these things themselves, often starting from scratch, and often making big mistakes. My advice and design drew on a combination of my own experience as well as observing how others had tackled the back to land process over the previous decade. By then I also had a very strong commitment to Victoria and South Eastern Australia of landscapes and ecologies and design issues that I was familiar with in that territory.   Dan Palmer: Was that where all or the majority of your professional work happened?    David Holmgren: Yeah, it was. There was occasional work further-afield - certainly into the dry Mediterranean country in South Australia and into New South Wales, Sydney region, but most of it was in Victoria.  Dan Palmer: Permaculture was a new thing so in a sense you were defining the industry or making it up as you went along.   David Holmgren: Yeah. It was also a time of very strong backlash against alternative ideas. When I set up the business, I had mixed feelings about whether I would descri...
1 hr 16 min
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