Eat My Globe
Eat My Globe
Nov 23, 2020
The Q&A Episode
Play • 59 min

Have you ever wondered how an episode of Eat My Globe is put together? Or, do you have questions about our host, Simon or his passion for food history? Or, do you have a question about where a particular food or cooking style originated? Then this is the episode for you. Simon responds to questions that have been put to him by our many listeners on social media. So listen in to find out more about what makes Simon and the Eat My Globe team tick.

And if you want to be a part of the team - click here

So make sure to follow along every week and follow us on:

Twitter: @EatMyGlobePcast

Instagram: @EatMyGlobe

Facebook: @EatMyGlobeOfficial

Twitter: @SimonMajumdar

Instagram: @SimonMajumdar

Facebook: @SimonMajumdarPage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/simon-majumdar-2760156

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/EatMyGlobe

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Producer: @producergirl

 

The Kitchen Sisters Present
The Kitchen Sisters Present
The Kitchen Sisters & Radiotopia
157 — Chido Govera—The Mushroom Queen of Zimbabwe
A mushroom farmer, food activist, business entrepreneur, foster mother to more than a dozen girls—Chido Govera is a kitchen visionary in Zimbabwe—a pioneer in the cultivation of mushrooms throughout Africa and the world. Chido was orphaned at 7 when her mother died of AIDS. As a girl, who never had enough to eat, she began cultivating mushrooms when she was nine. Some people look at a mushroom and see a mushroom. Chido looked at a mushroom and saw a weapon for social change, a path out of hunger and poverty to empowerment and income for herself and other orphaned girls. The founder of The Future of Hope Foundation, Chido has promoted mushroom cultivation as a sustainable source of food and income in impoverished regions of the world. We met Chido in Sao Paolo at FRUTO, an international gathering of chefs, farmers, activists, fishermen, Amazonian tribal women organizers, botanists and more—organized by Brazilian chef Alex Atala, famous from Netflix’s Chef’s Table. Speakers from around the world delved deep into issues of food, zero waste, the destruction of coastal waters, agriculture and climate change, the rights and foods of indigenous people of the Amazon. The conference was profound—a global eye opener. Special thanks to Alex Atala, Felipe Ribenboim, Lars Williams and the NOMA community in Denmark. The Kitchen Sisters Present is part of Radiotopia from PRX, a curated collection of podcasts from some of the best independent producers around.
25 min
Science Diction
Science Diction
Science Friday and WNYC Studios
How Do You Name A Hurricane?
How did we wind up with a storm named Iota? Well, we ran out of hurricane names. Every year, the World Meteorological Organization puts out a list of 21 names for the season’s hurricanes and tropical storms. But this year, the Atlantic hurricane season was so active that by September, we'd flown through the whole list of names and had to switch to the Greek alphabet. Thus, Hurricane Iota became the 30th named storm of the season. We’ve only had to dip into the Greek alphabet once before, in 2005. But the practice of naming hurricanes goes back to the 19th century, and it was a bit of a bumpy ride to land on the system we use today. In this episode: The story of a meteorologist in Australia, a novel, and a second-wave feminist from Florida—and how they brought us hurricane names. Guests: Christina M. Gonzalez is a doctoral candidate in anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin. Liz Skilton is a historian and the author of Tempest: Hurricane Naming and American Culture. Footnotes & Further Reading: For more hurricane history, check out A Furious Sky: The Five-Hundred-Year History of America's Hurricanes by Eric Jay Dolin. To learn more about Roxcy Bolton and the fight to change the naming system, read Liz Skilton’s article “Gendering Natural Disaster: The Battle Over Female Hurricane Names.” Credits: Science Diction is hosted and produced by Johanna Mayer. Our editor and producer is Elah Feder. We had story editing from Nathan Tobey, and fact checking by Michelle Harris. Our composer is Daniel Peterschmidt. Chris Wood did sound design and mastered the episode. Special thanks to the Florida State Library & Archives for allowing us use footage from Roxcy Bolton’s oral history interview. Nadja Oertelt is our chief content officer.
22 min
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