Biz Buds
Biz Buds
Jan 20, 2021
Episode 51: The Magic of Video
Play • 58 min

In today's episode, Mike and Tom talk all about the magic of video. A very powerful tool in 2021, they'll dig into video creating tips and which steps you can take to improve the quality of your video content.

Resourceful Designer - Resources to help streamline your graphic design and web design business.
Resourceful Designer - Resources to help streamline your graphic design and web design business.
Mark Des Cotes
Presenting With The 10-20-30 Rule - RD248
Follow the 10-20-30 Rule for great presentations. Have you ever heard of the 10-20-30 Rule? It’s more often called the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint, but the principle applies elsewhere as well. This Rule was coined several years ago by Guy Kawasaki, a venture capitalist who sat through dozens of presentation pitches regularly. It was his job to listen to people pitch their business ideas, and after years of this, he noted that the best presentations, the ones that are more likely to close the deal, all followed a similar format, which he coined the 10-20-30 Rule. And this Rule is simple. • 10 Slides • 20 Minute Presentation • 30 Point minimum size font. That’s it. According to Kawasaki, this setup gives you the best chance to impact the person or people you’re presenting positively. Kawasaki was talking about people pitching business ideas to venture capitalists. But the same principle applies to you, a designer pitching your ideas to clients. Let’s break it down the 10-20-30 Rule. Rule #1: 10 Slides. Kawasaki pointed out that it’s tough for someone to comprehend more than ten concepts in a meeting. If you try, you’re more than most likely to confuse them. Follow the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Stupid.) Limiting your presentation to only 10 slides or 10 sheets or pages does just that. Break your presentation down into 10 points, one per slide. Maybe something like this. • Slide 1: Your interpretation of who the client is. • Slide 2: Identifying the client’s competition. • Slide 3: The Problem the client is facing. • Slide 4: The Solution you are proposing. • Slide 5: How your solution solves the client’s problem. • Slide 6: Examples of your solution in place. • Slide 7: Projections and outcomes from Implementing your solution. • Slide 8: Timeline for the project. • Slide 9: Cost of the project. • Slide 10: Summary and call to action.  This example uses a maximum of 10 slides, but you can do it in less, then all the better.  Rule #2: 20 Minutes. It doesn’t matter if you are allotted 30 minutes or an hour. Your actual presentation should take no more than 20 minutes. If you can’t present your idea within that time frame, you’re doing something wrong. Have you heard of TED Talks? Did you know that TED Talks have a maximum length of 18 minutes? TED organizers chose this time length based on neuroscience research that says 18 minutes is long enough for a speaker to flesh out their idea and short enough for a listener to take it in, digest what they are hearing, and understand all of the vital information. Not only that, but they know that shorter presentations require you to edit things down to the most important and relevant material.  If you have more time allotted to you, use it for introductions and setting up your equipment. You should also leave time for Q&A after your presentation. Plus, you never know when an emergency might arise and cut the meeting short. 20 minutes is the ideal time to keep someone’s interest in what you are showing them. Longer than 20 minutes, and you risk their mind wandering to other things and possibly missing critical points you’re trying to make. Rule #3: 30-Pt Font. As a designer, I trust you know that slides or presentation papers are most effective when they contain very little wording. I’m hoping I don’t have to explain that to you. This 10-20-30 Rule was written for people pitching a product or business idea, not for experienced designers. But just the same, it’s something to remember when you create your presentation slides or handouts. Using a larger point size forces you to cut back on unnecessary verbiage. The only reason to have a smaller type on a slide is to cram on more text. But by doing so, your client may think you’re not familiar with your material and that you need your slides to act as a teleprompter. And that, in turn, may make them feel like you are not invested in them. Not to mention, the more type you have on a slide, the more the client will focus on reading it and not listening to what you’re saying. You know what I mean, we’ve all done it before—reading ahead while ignoring the presenter. Avoid this by using 30 point or larger fonts. Forget the bullet list and instead, tell your clients the key points. It will mean much more coming out of your mouth than words on a screen or sheet of paper. As a comparison, Steve Jobs, a great presenter in his time, insisted on a 96-point type on all his presentation slides. If it’s good enough for a multi-billion company, it should be good enough for you. Bonus As a bonus to his 10-20-30 Rule, Guy Kawasaki also said that the most persuasive presentations he’s sat through, typically used white type on a black or dark coloured background.  The way he puts it is, anyone can put black type on a white background. It’s the default in all programs. However, white type on a dark background is something you have to conscientiously, and shows that you’ve put effort into your presentation. Not to mention that white type on a dark background looks classier and is easier to read. Don’t believe me? Think of movie credits. How often do you see black credits on a white background? Hardly ever. You can learn from that. Do you follow the 10-20-30 Rule? Let me know by leaving a comment for this episode. Tip of the week Capture Full-Screen websites on your iPhone. If you are an iPhone user there's a nifty feature you may not know about. The ability to take full-page screenshots of webpages. In Safari, take a screenshot of any webpage. Edit the screenshot. At the top of the page, you can toggle between "Screen" and "Full Page". Selecting "Full Page" allows you to save the entire webpage as a PDF to your Files folder. This is a quick and easy way to capture the mobile view of any webpage.
17 min
The Email Marketing Show
The Email Marketing Show
ResponseSuite
Get Your Emails Delivered (And Avoid The Spam Folder) With Adrian Savage
Having your emails end up in the dreaded spam folder is the main thing we ALL want to avoid, right? After all, if they go into your subscribers spam, it’s likely they won’t get opened…and that sucks. So, is there a sure-fire way in which we can avoid this happening, or do we just have to hope and pray for the best? Adrian Savage, Founder and creator of https://deliverabilitydashboard.com/ (Deliverability Dashboard) and email deliverability wizard (it’s true) is here to tell us about all of the things we need to be doing, in order to stay clear of the spam folder as much as possible. The Right Way To Run Viral Contests to Build Your Email List with Travis KetchumEpisode Content(02:09) Two lies and a truth – these are awesome! (03:45) No one wants to end up in the bin. How do we avoid it? (05:16) Like most things in life, it’s not always that straight-forward, but why? (06:39) If someone tells you this one thing….run away from them. (07:20) What has changed in the last few years with deliverability? (08:24) The “good old days” of email marketing. (09:13) What should we be doing to increase engagement? (10:49) Adrian can double your open rate in 3 seconds. (12:28) You really need to keep on top of this if you want your engagement to stay tip-top. (13:00) Replies and forwards are nice…but how much do they really help? (15:07) Do you email everyone in your list? If so, you need to listen to this.  (16:52) Let’s get “techy” for a moment. This is going to help you almost immediately. (18:17) The power of segmenting, but not in the way you may be doing it already. (19:42) One of the things we do in our first email to help with engagement. (20:19) The very best subject line Adrian has ever used. It’s insanely simple…and it works. Subscribe and Review The Email Marketing Show PodcastThanks so much for tuning into the podcast, if you enjoyed it we'd really appreciate you Subscribing to and leaving us a Review of the show on your favourite podcast player. Not only does it let us know you're out there, listening, but your feedback helps us to keep creating the most useful episodes - not to mention to helps us get discovered by more people.
25 min
The Science of Social Media
The Science of Social Media
Buffer
How to Build an Audience on Twitter (with Matthew Kobach)
Welcome to episode 200 of The Science of Social Media! Thanks to each and every one of you for tuning in to the show and joining us on this journey. Today we're focusing on how you can build an audience on Twitter.  Twitter has over 321 million monthly active users, and it’s the perfect platform to build an audience — either for your personal brand or on behalf of your company. But how do you actually get people to follow your account, and engage with the content you share? To dig into all-things Twitter growth, we're joined by Matthew Kobach. Since early 2019, Matthew has built an audience of over 85,000 followers on his personal Twitter account and in just a couple of months, he's helped grow Fast's Twitter following to over 20,000.  I hope you enjoy the episode! And if you do, we'd really appreciate a review and five stars on Apple Podcasts (or wherever you listen to the show). ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ - Dave About the Show: Each week in Science of Social Media the Buffer team answer your questions and explore marketing strategies and tactics to help you grow your business through social media and build a brand your customers love. Join our 25,000+ weekly listeners. The Science of Social Media is proudly made by the Buffer team. Feel free to get in touch with us for any thoughts, ideas, or feedback. We'd love for you to check out the detailed show notes at www.buffer.com/podcast Check us out on Instagram - www.instagram.com/buffer Check us out on Facebook - www.facebook.com/bufferapp Check us out on Twitter - www.twitter.com/buffer
19 min
Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
Jason Swenk
Should Your Marketing Agency Pitch for Free?
Are you tired of losing time and money on RFPs? Do you want to start charging for creative strategy? There's a long-standing debate in the agency world about whether or not we should pitch for free. It all comes down to knowing when and how to position a paid strategy. In this episode, we'll cover: * Pitching new clients vs. organic agency growth. * How your agency can get paid for the pitch. * Should your agency ever work for free? I talked to Aleena Mazhar, Vice President and Managing Director of the Experiential Division of Fuse Create, a marketing and ad agency based in Toronto. Aleena is a self-admitted addict to the fast-paced nature and constant problem-solving of the agency culture. Aleena has experienced both organic growth in her agency as well as growth fueled by pitching the agency's services through the traditional RFP process. She is here to talk about both methods and when it's ok to give your ideas away for free. Pitching New Clients Vs. Organic Agency Growth Aleena says she and her partners at Fuse were fortunate that when they created their agency, they each brought clients with them. This fueled a lot of organic growth, as the agency leaned on these existing clients for input on how to expand their services to meet their needs. This helped build a stronger relationship with their clients. By being responsive to their needs Fuse was willing to grow alongside their clients. It also brought new business through word-of-mouth from those satisfied clients. How Your Agency Can Get Paid for the Pitch Aleena feels you should not be pitching for free. Pitching for free is essentially giving away your creative vision to a company that could ultimately decide they don't want to work with you. Your time and your agency's creativity deserve compensation. How do you get paid for the pitch though, particularly in an industry where free pitches are commonplace? One way involves assisting an existing client in developing a strategy for their RFP on an upcoming launch. By getting your team involved in strategizing with the client on what they are looking for, you ensure your team's work isn't being given away. You also position your agency to win the proposal since you have been involved from the early stages and have helped develop the proposal requirements that you must meet. Additionally, there is comfort for the client in working with a team they have already become familiar with. Should Your Agency Ever Work for Free? While the preference is getting paid for creativity, Aleena says there are projects the agency will pitch for free because they are simply so enthusiastic about the work. They're willing to take the risk just to be involved in it. As a smaller agency, very selective with the clients they work with, Fuse can't afford to do free pitches often. However, if it's the right fit; the right size, the right niche, and the right service needs - it's a no-brainer. "In your heart, you know when it's the right thing to do," she says. With those unicorn opportunities too big to risk putting the client off with a paid pitch, Aleena says it's important to involve all levels of the agency team. This reinforces the feeling of transparency that builds trust between the client and the team and helps the client feel that his or her needs are of the greatest importance to the agency. Would you like a 90% close rate on the deals you want? It took my agency years to develop a solid foot in the door offer that converted at a high rate. And, Ian has spent the last 10 years developing his too. That's why we decided to collaborate and create the FITD framework to share with other agency owners. If you want to learn more check out FootInTheDoor.com. You can discover the exact framework that Ian and I created so you can be successful. Close deals faster, stop giving away strategy for free and win the deals you want. When you have the right framework, you will find your sales process is scalable. You can even step away from sales and so you can spend your time working on the best.
26 min
UI Narrative: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
UI Narrative: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
Tolu Ajayi
Balancing Being a Parent While Making a Career Pivot | Terri Rodriguez-Hong
Episode 35 Show Notes: Becoming a parent is most likely the most challenging job you'll ever have. Terri Rodriguez-Hong shares her story of getting into UX Design and encourages parents looking to make the career pivot. Mentions: Contact Out (Chrome plug-in) https://contactout.com/ Online communities UX Her - Woman of Color product design group https://community.uxher.com Where are the black designers - Slack group https://wherearetheblackdesigners.com Black By Design https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12077430/ All Black Creatives https://www.allblackcreatives.com Hire Black https://hireblacksummit.com Designer Hangout https://designerhangout.co Designer’s Guild https://www.facebook.com/groups/designguild Terri’s LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/flaxenink/ Terri’s Twitter https://twitter.com/flaxenink Terri’s Website https://www.terrirodriguezhong.com Podcast Info: Transcripts available on episode web page. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Stitcher, and Spotify. RSS feed: https://uinarrative.libsyn.com/rss Don’t forget to subscribe and leave a review if you like what you hear. Announcements: Join the UI Narrative Email Club to be the first to hear about weekly blog posts and exclusive podcast recaps. You can sign up at uinarrative.com/emailclub. Want to improve your UI design? Learn more at uinarrative.com/gradingsystem. Let’s Connect: Have a question for me? Email me at hello@uinarrative.com. Let’s connect! #uinarrative Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn @uinarrative Twitter @uinarrativeco
48 min
The Social Bamboo Podcast: Social Media Marketing for Business
The Social Bamboo Podcast: Social Media Marketing for Business
Derek Videll: Social Media Marketing Expert
129: Want me to Follow you on Clubhouse?
In this episode, you're going to learn how to grow your sales and following from Clubhouse! Not just on Clubhouse, but how you can use this app to make massive growth to your Instagram page as well.   Clubhouse is my new favorite thing that I am ready to go all in on this year. If you're with me, you're going to absolutely love this episode! That's because I'm not going to just teach you how to grow on Clubhouse, I'm going to show you how you can get me to follow you on Clubhouse as well as shout out your business from my Instagram page! *To Get me to Follow you on Clubhouse: *1. Review the podcast and DM a screenshot to @DerekVidell OR 2. Like the Social Bamboo Facebook Page and DM a screenshot to @DerekVidell - If you do both I'll like your Facebook page too :) *To Earn a Free Shoutout from My Instagram Page: *1. Create a Clubhouse account 2. Participate as a Clubhouse listener for 2 -4 hours. 3. Either ask a question in my Clubhouse room on Tuesday morning OR start your own room! Post about the room on your story while it's happening and tag me @DerekVidell and I will re-share it to my story and say some great things about you and your business! *My Upcoming Clubhouse Schedule: *Every Tuesday Morning at 10:30 am ET 2/23: LIVE Instagram Account Audits for Businesses!! Cost $0 3/2: I KNOW I Need to Post Reels... But How? 3/9: Social Media Marketing for Business 3/16: FREE Instagram Audits! Who wants the hot seat? 3/23: Clubhouse Marketing 101
43 min
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