Episode 268: Keepin' It Real To Give A Designer Feel
Play • 29 min

Betsy answers all your design questions!

The Slow Home Podcast
The Slow Home Podcast
Brooke McAlary
Meditation, acceptance and relinquishing control with Kevin Janks - Life in the Time of Covid-19
We've all heard about the transformative power of meditation, but how can we access it when uncertainty, stress and living through a pandemic make it difficult to simply sit still and breathe?  In today's episode Brooke is joined by friend of the show and founder of Centred Meditation, Kevin Janks, to talk through the power of meditation in challenging times.  Meditation allows us to decompress from 'fight or flight' mode and as Kevin explains, the time investment doesn’t need to be excessive. (Research has found that meditating for as little as 12 minutes a day can have a substantial impact over the course of three weeks). It can also be used to shift our perception of control, which is often the overriding emotion during times of crisis, and by doing so, release us from the stress of trying to control and uncontrollable situation. Kevin also shares how meditation allows us to accept the current circumstances we find ourselves in (not in order to accept and give up, but in order to simply accept the way things are at the moment) and use that freedom to look at how we will move forward when we're able.  There's so much to be taken from meditation, particularly during such stressful times, and this conversation with Kevin is full of tools and takeaways that will hopefully help you.  Enjoy!  Looking for more Slow? Find show notes, resources and links at slowyourhome.com/season6 Follow us on Instagram @slowhomepod Sign up for the Slow Post, Brooke's weekly slow-living love letters  Or leave a rating or review in iTunes Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/slow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
40 min
Change Academy
Change Academy
Brock Armstrong & Monica Reinagel
36: What You Gain by Slowing Down
We often feel like we have to make a decision, make a change, make a difference, or achieve a goal quickly. But if we want the benefits to be meaningful and lasting, shouldn’t we be willing to take our time? In this episode, we consider the downside of rushing into a decision to change without considering the realities of trying to create change in too much of a hurry. Then, we'll explore some alternatives. Takeaways: * Knowing or understanding how to do something isn’t the same as actually doing it and experiencing it. Better to gather less information and apply it than to gather lots of information but never to put anything into action. * Sometimes, learning how to slow down and be more deliberate is part of what we need to learn to do in order to get to the result we’re seeking. * Before deciding to commit to a new goal or challenge, be sure you understand what it will involve and whether you’re actually willing to do what it will take. * Things we acquire or develop through slow steady work have a better chance of becoming long-term habits. Lab Experiment Think of an area of your life where you feel like you are in a hurry to finish or achieve something. And ask yourself: * Is trying to get there more quickly actually serving you or just causing you to cut corners? * How could slowing down actually enhance either the process or the result (or both)? * What do you need to adjust about either your actions, beliefs, or self-talk to allow yourself to slow down? * What parts of the process (rather than the outcome) can you focus on that will bring you pleasure and satisfaction?
24 min
The Love Food Podcast
The Love Food Podcast
Julie Duffy Dillon RDN
(237) I feel addicted to food while trying to recover with intuitive eating and making peace with food.
Do you describe yourself as a food addict? Frustrated with your food obsession? I have made this Love Food Podcast episode for you. Let's unravel what is going on, sift through what you need, and make new connections. Subscribe and leave a review here in just seconds. This episode of The Love Food Podcast is brought to you by my PCOS + Food Peace Course: Get 30% off using the coupon code ‘LOVE2021’ starting Valentine’s Day through the end of February. Grab details at PCOSandFoodPeace.com. Thank you for you supporting the Love Food Podcast! Dear Food, I know exactly when our journey began. I had an anonormally skinny ballerina body and had gained a few pounds over the summer. I knew what I had to do. My parents always did diets so I figured it was just a part of growing up. Little did I know that losing those few pounds would lead to a horrible relationship with you and an unhealthy amount of weight gain. I used to not think about you. When I was bored, you weren’t the first one I went to. You were fuel not an addiction. Never in a million years would I have thought I would be where I am now. I have drifted so far and our relationship is so weak. I hate you but love you at the same time. You control me and I cannot contain myself around you. I’m addicted. You control my thoughts and take up my whole life. The more I pull away, the more I am attracted to you. I’m not sure why I go to you. Maybe it’s my low self-esteem, or my body image issues, or my constant want and need to look like society’s beauty standards. I feel that you are an escape I have to run from my toxic thoughts about my body because no one else cares. I feel like I cannot even continue my daily life because of the hold you have on me. I hate myself because of you but I can’t stop going back to you. I’ve tried to limit you but our relationship seems to get worse and worse. You were enjoyable, now I dread you. I’m fearful of what you will do to me. I’m fearful of how far I will go with you. You used to be a natural instinct that didn’t matter to me, now I can’t go five minutes without wanting you or thinking about how you ruin me. I guess the truth is…you aren’t the problem. Its me. I abuse you. I hate myself so I become overwhelmed and run to you. I’m not sure why I go to you. It seems counterproductive, but I’m in hopes of finding out why you have such a hold on me. I am guilty after going to you. I am humiliated, even if no one else knows. All I want is a healthy relationship with you and my body so I can move on with my life. Sincerely, a girl who needs help Show Notes: * Julie Dillon RD blog * The PCOS + Food Peace Free Roadmap * The PCOS + Food Peace Course * Link to get latest Food Peace Syllabus. * 6 Keys To Food Peace * Healthy Bodies Curriculum by Kathy Kater LCSW * Submit your Dear Food letter here or https://forms.gle/pepKRGPC8JbHLHHn8 * Julie on Instagram: Instagram.com/FoodPeaceDietitian * Find Eating Disorder Dietitians near you. Do you have a complicated relationship with food? I want to help! Send your Dear Food letter to LoveFoodPodcast@gmail.com. Click here to leave me a review in iTunes and subscribe. This type of kindness helps the show continue!
32 min
At The End of The Tunnel
At The End of The Tunnel
Light Watkins
Sharon Salzberg on Her Reluctance to Start Teaching Meditation and the Story Behind Co-founding the Insight Meditation Society - Ep 040
Sharon Salzberg is a New York Times best-selling author and teacher of Buddhist meditation. The foundations of her teachings haven’t come from countless hours of practice and mastery, but rather from a life of suffering. Although difficult, Sharon’s childhood molded her to become one of the most influential meditative teachers in the United States and western world.  As today’s guest, Sharon walks us through her journey, touching on her traumatic upbringing, journey into meditation, and life as a teacher. First off, Sharon tells us about her daily meditation routine.  She then walks us through her childhood in more detail and describes the loss of her mother, her relationship with her estranged father, and the effect her immigrant grandparents had on her. Later, listeners will hear about the transitional period Sharon went through in college and about how she discovered philosophy and meditation. As we find out more, Sharon talks about her travels to India, as she shares various anecdotes about her teachers and experiences. Upon her return to the United States, Sharon embarked on a mission to create a center in Barre. She talks about the challenges she faced as well as what life was like discovering Western ways of living in a brand new community.  Toward the end of the episode, Sharon tells us about her books, how the pandemic has impacted her teaching, and how she has adapted to a rapidly evolving world. To find out more about Mindfulness, Meditation, and Metta, be sure to tune in today. *Key Points From This Episode:* * Introducing today’s guest, Sharon Salzberg. * Sharon describes her meditation practices. * Hear about Sharon’s childhood in more detail. * Sharon details the night her life changed when her mother was rushed to the hospital. * We ask Sharon about her spiritual and religious foundations as a child. * The journey Sharon took to become a teacher.  * How choosing a philosophy course in college would ultimately change Sharon’s life. * Sharon tells us about her teacher and mentor, Trungpa Rinpoche. * Hear about Sharon’s experiences in India. * What Metta is and how it works. * Sharon’s experiences opening her center in Barre. * What the history of meditation waves can teach us about where meditation is going. * How Sharon stays relevant as an influential meditation teacher. * Principles mentioned in Sharon’s book, Real Change. * How Sharon sees links between Thai sex trafficking and poor farming conditions. * Why Sharon believes Thai violence is linked to a public health problem. * Ways meditation can help you get good at life. * Sharon tells us about her interactions with Buddhist teacher U Pandita.
1 hr 17 min
Dermatology Weekly
Dermatology Weekly
Medscape Professional Network
Applying for dermatology residency as a student of color
To truly increase diversity in dermatology, students of color need to be encouraged that dermatology is achievable. In this resident takeover, Sophie A. Greenberg, MD (@sophiegreenberg), talks to Nicole A. Negbenebor, MD (Instagram: @naijalatte), about her personal experience navigating dermatology residency as an applicant of color. “Dermatology is such a wonderful field and I feel that it has had the ability to impact so many different people, different socioeconomic statuses, different backgrounds, but unfortunately the workforce does not reflect the population sometimes that they’re serving,” Dr. Negbenebor notes. They also discuss the importance of mentorship and networking opportunities, and Dr. Negbenebor offers advice on the dermatology residency application process. Article: https://www.mdedge.com/dermatology/article/235130/diversity-medicine/advice-applying-dermatology-applicant-color-keep-going?channel=64 Downloadable PDF: https://cdn.mdedge.com/files/s3fs-public/CT107001015_e.PDF * * * Host: Sophie A. Greenberg, MD (department of dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York) Guests: Nicole A. Negbenebor, MD (department of dermatology, Brown University, Providence, R.I.) Disclosures: Dr. Greenberg and Dr. Negbenebor report no conflict of interest. Show notes by: Allegra Sparta, Melissa Sears * * * You can find more of our podcasts at http://www.mdedge.com/podcasts Email the show: podcasts@mdedge.com Interact with us on Twitter: @MDedgeDerm
13 min
The ChickPeeps Vegan Podcast
The ChickPeeps Vegan Podcast
Evanna Lynch
S3, Ep20: Anti-Poaching & Female Empowerment, with Damien Mander, the Vegan Ranger
This season of The ChickPeeps is brought to you by our friends at Vivo Life! Use our code 'chickpeeps10' to get 10% off your order at vivolife.com. This week on the show we’re talking to the founder of the International Anti-Poaching Foundation, Damien Mander. Damien is a former Special Operations sniper who traveled to Africa in 2009, after leaving the military, in search of a new adventure. Instead he discovered “a purpose amongst chaos” when he saw the body of an enormous bull elephant that had been brutally killed for his tusks. In that moment, Damien’s life changed forever and our movement gained a powerful, passionate and highly skilled animal advocate. In this interview Damien talks to Robbie and Evy about his vegan journey, founding the IAPF and about Akashinga, Africa’s first armed, plant-based, all-women anti-poaching unit. We conducted this interview while Damien was at one of the IAPF reserves in Kenya. The sounds you can hear in the background of our conversation are the authentic noises of the Kenyan wildlife at night! Also in this episode… * Damien identifies going vegan as the single most important thing he’s done with his life. * In pursuit of adventure, Damien talks about his initial motivation to visit Africa, having heard about the anti-poaching world years earlier. * “These guys are defending the heart and lungs of the planet.” - Damien talks about seeing the work of rangers for the first time, and how it made him see past his ego to reevaluate his life and the kind of person he wanted to be. * “Having hunted [animals] before Iraq, I never hunted after Iraq because I knew what it was like to be hunted” - Damien talks about how his perspective on animals was radically shifted by his experiences serving twelve tours in Iraq. * How the world of anti-poaching gave Damien a purpose that had previously eluded him. * Damien shares how he repurposed his skills as a sniper in the army to set up the International Anti-Poaching Foundation. * We learn about Akashinga, Africa’s first plant-based all-female anti-poaching unit and Damien shares why he believes women are innately predisposed to be able to protect wildlife and de-escalate conflict. * “The women are survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, AIDs orphans, single mothers, abandoned wives and when we set this up we thought, ‘lets give an opportunity to some of the most marginalized women, in the toughest positions’ - what we didn’t realise is we were getting the hardest women there were” - on the all female Akashinga rangers. * “There’s two types of conservationists. Vegans… and those that don’t like to take their work home” - Damien pulls no punches when talking about his stance on veganism as a conservationist. * Damien has a fresh definition of the alpha male. Links: International Anti-Poaching Foundation Damien’s Modern Warrior TEDtalk Phillip Wollen: Animals Should Be Off the Menu Akashinga: The Brave Ones The Game Changers Chef Cola’s Instagram Get In Touch: Bonus Content: ChickPeeps Patreon Instagram: @ChickPeepsPod Facebook: @ChickPeepsPodcast
49 min
The Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast
The Eating Disorder Recovery Podcast
Tabitha Farrar
Thanks for Listening!
I've not written a blog for months. I've been moving house, had little internet connection, and been generally busy, and tired. I'm glad that this past couple of weeks I had felt like I have the time and space to start writing again, so there will be blogs to come, soon. I wanted to put something down to express my gratitude for all of you who have listened to and supported my podcast over the past three years. I didn't think that it would go anywhere, or that anyone would really listen to it. Well, you did. So thank you. I've had such support for the podcast, that I feel extremely guilty about announcing that I will not be producing any more episodes. But, as I discovered in the last 6 months or so, feeling guilty about stopping is not a good enough reason to keep going. I'd rather than stop completely than keep it going, but only publish episodes sporadically. Podcasts are a lot of work. Finding people to interview, scheduling interviews, and editing audio after interviews. If I am quick, an episode may take 6 hours start to finish (including scheduling etc), but many episodes take more like 10. It is a time thing. It's not that I don't have time. I can always make time. These days, my "free" time — time to do absolutely nothing productive at all — is increasingly precious and glorious to me. I am growing less inclined to give it up. I'm more selfish about my time — unapologetically, I enjoy that I enjoy being just me, without being the 'doing stuff' me. This 'wanting to do nothing' is actually exactly something that scared me when I had anorexia. I was scared that if I allowed myself to rest, I would always want to rest. I would forget how to be productive. My 'value' would decrease. Because when I was sick, I thought my value was in my ability to never rest, and always be productive. (Which, if you think about it, in a famine, would be about right.) The wonderful thing about being human in a brain that doesn't have anorexia any more, doesn't perceive that resources are scarce, and therefore doesn't believe that value is in productivity, is that I have the freedom to see the real value of being human. I know that sounds incredibly deep and ridiculous, but it is true. The other night, I was going to make this podcast. I had an hour or so. I was making my way up my back porch steps, and one of the puppies followed me up and "pawed" me on the leg, asking for attention. Years ago, when my value was in being productive, I either wouldn't have noticed him, or I would have noticed him, and gone inside anyway. These days, I'm more inclined to sit on the floor and play with the dogs because they asked than I am to go inside and start editing audio. Sometimes it is a puppy. Sometimes it is a horse. Sometimes it is a pattern that the wind has made in the snow that I need to stare at. Sometimes, very often, it is snuggling with Matt. I never take for granted my recovered brain. A brain that allows me to see the value in happiness, and being human. Never, ever, take it for granted. I feel blessed to have known a brain in starvation mode, if only because it allows me to know the bliss of not being there. Anyway. That's my way of saying there will be no more podcasts. Just because it is the right time to stop. I appreciate you for listening.
7 min
Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban
Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban
Melissa Urban
Hypothangry | Dr. Vickie Bhatia
Hypothangry: Imagining a hypothetical confrontation, then playing out the fight you’d hypothetically have with that person inside your own brain. Fantasy fights are often conducted with loved ones or friends, but can occur with total strangers. (See: “hypothetically angry,” the cousin-once-removed of “rehearsing disaster.”) Today, licensed clinical psychologist and Whole30 Certified Coach Dr. Vickie Bhatia comes back to the podcast to unpack why we create hypothetical situations in our head and then get mad about them in real life. We’ll discuss how relationships, trauma, uncertainty, and judgment factor in; where anger really comes from and whether anger is helpful or harmful; the two most common triggers for hypothangry scenarios; and a plan for identifying, interrupting, and moving on gracefully from this behavior.  Continue the conversation with me @melissau on Instagram. If you have a question for Dear Melissa or a topic idea for the show, leave me a voicemail at (321) 209-1480. Do the Thing is part of The Onward Project, a family of podcasts brought together by Gretchen Rubin—all about how to make your life better. Check out the other Onward Project podcasts—Happier with Gretchen Rubin, Side Hustle School, Happier in Hollywood, and Everything Happens with Kate Bowler . If you liked this episode, please subscribe, leave a 5-star review, and tell your friends to Do the Thing! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
43 min
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