Nerdist
Nerdist
Jan 20, 2021
Elisabeth Shue
Play • 1 hr 17 min

Elisabeth Shue is a fantastic guest on the podcast! As someone who has been in some of the most iconic pop culture touchstones (Karate Kid, Back to the Future II & III, Adventures in Babysitting, Leaving Las Vegas, The Boys) there's a lot to talk about. In addition, she is very cool, kind, and open while sharing some great advice for staying grounded and keeping one's ego healthily in check. Watch her in season 3 of Cobra Kai, which is TERRIFIC and on Netflix right now! [Friendly SPOILER WARNING! Chris and Elisabeth do discuss some plot points of Cobra Kai season 3, so if you'd prefer to be fully caught up first go do that and then come back and listen!]

Christmas Past
Christmas Past
Brian Earl
Interview — Julia Georgallis, author of How to Eat Your Christmas Tree
Christmas trees are for decorating, admiring, and placing decoratively wrapped gifts underneath. But how about...for eating? Baker and designer Julia Georgalis joins me in this episode to discuss her new book, How to Eat Your Christmas Tree. It's the result of a five-year culinary experiment centered around sustainability at Christmas time. Mentioned in this episode * Julia Georgallis on Instagram * The book: How to Eat Your Christmas Tree * Julia's Web site * The Edible Archive Music in this episode * Jingle Bells Calm — Kevin MacLeod, via Incompetech * Wish Background — Kevin MacLeod via Incompetech * It Came Upon a Midnight Clear — Kevin MacLeod via Incompetech Be sure to check out the "Definitive Directory of Christmas Podcasts" Share a Christmas memory on the podcast! Just record a voice memo into your phone and send it to christmaspastpodcast@gmail.com. Keep it reasonably short, clean and family friendly, and be sure to say your name and where you're from. Christmas trees are for decorating, admiring, and placing decoratively wrapped gifts underneath. But how about...for eating? Baker and designer Julia Georgalis joins me in this episode to discuss her new book, How to Eat Your Christmas Tree. It's the result of a five-year culinary experiment centered around sustainability at Christmas time. Mentioned in this episode * Julia Georgallis on Instagram * The book: How to Eat Your Christmas Tree * Julia's Web site * The Edible Archive Music in this episode * Jingle Bells Calm — Kevin MacLeod, via Incompetech * Wish Background — Kevin MacLeod via Incompetech * It Came Upon a Midnight Clear — Kevin MacLeod via Incompetech Be sure to check out the "Definitive Directory of Christmas Podcasts" Share a Christmas memory on the podcast! Just record a voice memo into your phone and send it to christmaspastpodcast@gmail.com. Keep it reasonably short, clean and family friendly, and be sure to say your name and where you're from.
11 min
A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Andrew Hickey
Episode 114: "My Boy Lollipop" by Millie
This week's episode looks at "My Boy Lollipop" and the origins of ska music. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "If You Wanna Be Happy" by Jimmy Soul. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have created a Mixcloud playlist containing every song heard in this episode -- a content warning applies for the song "Bloodshot Eyes" by Wynonie Harris. The information about ska in general mostly comes from Bass Culture: When Reggae Was King by Lloyd Bradley, with some also from Reggae and Caribbean Music by Dave Thompson. Biographical information on Millie Small is largely from this article in Record Collector, plus a paywalled interview with Goldmine magazine (which I won't link to because of the paywall). Millie's early recordings with Owen Gray and Coxsone Dodd can be found on this compilation, along with a good selection of other recordings Dodd produced, while this compilation gives a good overview of her recordings for Island and Fontana. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Erratum I refer to "Barbara Gaye" when I should say "Barbie Gaye" Transcript Today, we're going to take our first look at a form of music that would go on to have an almost incalculable influence on the music of the seventies, eighties, and later, but which at the time we're looking at was largely regarded as a novelty music, at least in Britain and America. We're going to look at the birth of ska, and at the first ska record to break big outside of Jamaica. We're going to look at "My Boy Lollipop" by Millie: [Excerpt: Millie, "My Boy Lollipop"] Most of the music we've looked at so far in the podcast has been from either America or Britain, and I'm afraid that that's going to remain largely the case -- while there has been great music made in every country in the world, American and British musicians have tended to be so parochial, and have dominated the music industry so much, that relatively little of that music has made itself felt widely enough to have any kind of impact on the wider history of rock music, much to rock's detriment. But every so often something from outside the British Isles or North America manages to penetrate even the closed ears of Anglo-American musicians, and today we're going to look at one of those records. Now, before we start this, this episode is, by necessity, going to be dealing in broad generalisations -- I'm trying to give as much information about Jamaica's musical culture in one episode as I've given about America's in a hundred, so I am going to have to elide a lot of details. Some of those details will come up in future episodes, as we deal with more Jamaican artists, but be aware that I'm missing stuff out. The thing that needs to be understood about the Jamaican music culture of the fifties and early sixties is that it developed in conditions of absolute poverty. Much of the music we looked at in the first year or so of the podcast came from extremely impoverished communities, of course, but even given how utterly, soul-crushingly, poor many people in the Deep South were, or the miserable conditions that people in Liverpool and London lived in while Britain was rebuilding itself after the war, those people were living in rich countries, and so still had access to some things that were not available to the poor people of poorer countries. So in Jamaica in the 1950s, almost nobody had access to any kind of record player or radio themselves. You wouldn't even *know* anyone who had one, unlike in the states where if you were very poor you might not have one yourself, but your better-off cousin might let you come round and listen to the radio at their house. So music was, by necessity, a communal experience. Jamaican music, or at least the music in Kingston, the biggest city in Jamaica, was organised around sound systems -- big public open-air systems run by DJs, playing records for dancing. These had originally started in shops as a way of getting customers in, but soon became so popular that people started doing them on their own. These sound systems played music that was very different from the music played on the radio, which was aimed mostly at people rich enough to own radios, which at that time mostly meant white British people -- in the fifties, Jamaica was still part of the British Empire, and there was an extraordinary gap between the music the white British colonial class liked and the music that the rest of the population liked. The music that the Jamaican population *made* was mostly a genre called mento. Now, this is somewhere where my ignorance of this music compared to other musics comes into play a bit. There seem to have been two genres referred to as mento. One of them, rural mento, was based around instruments like the banjo, and a home-made bass instrument called a "rhumba box", and had a resemblance to a lot of American country music or British skiffle -- this form of mento is often still called "country music" in Jamaica itself: [Excerpt: The Hiltonaires, "Matilda"] There was another variant of mento, urban mento, which dropped the acoustic and home-made instruments and replaced them with the same sort of instruments that R&B or jazz bands used. Everything I read about urban mento says that it's a different genre from calypso music, which generally comes from Trinidad and Tobago rather than Jamaica, but nothing explains what that difference is, other than the location. Mento musicians would also call their music calypso in order to sell it to people like me who don't know the difference, and so you would get mento groups called things like Count Lasher and His Calypsonians, Lord Lebby and the Jamaica Calypsonians, and Count Owen and His Calypsonians, songs called things like "Hoola Hoop Calypso", and mentions of calypso in the lyrics. I am fairly familiar with calypso music -- people like the Mighty Sparrow, Lord Melody, Roaring Lion, and so on -- and I honestly can't hear any difference between calypso proper and mento records like this one, by Lord Power and Trenton Spence: [Excerpt: Lord Power and Trenton Spence, "Strip Tease"] But I'll defer to the experts in these genres and accept that there's a difference I'm not hearing. Mento was primarily a music for live performance, at least at first -- there were very few recording facilities in Jamaica, and to the extent that records were made at all there, they were mostly done in very small runs to sell to tourists, who wanted a souvenir to take home. The music that the first sound systems played would include some mento records, and they would also play a fair number of latin-flavoured records. But the bulk of what they played was music for dancing, imported from America, made by Black American musicians, many of them the same musicians we looked at in the early months of this podcast. Louis Jordan was a big favourite, as was Wynonie Harris -- the biggest hit in the early years of the sound systems was Harris' "Bloodshot Eyes". I'm going to excerpt that here, because it was an important record in the evolution of Jamaican music, but be warned that the song trivialises intimate partner violence in a way that many people might find disturbing. If you might be upset by that, skip forward exactly thirty seconds now: [Excerpt: Wynonie Harris, "Bloodshot Eyes"] The other artists who get repeatedly named in the histories of the early sound systems along with Jordan and Harris are Fats Domino, Lloyd Price, Professor Longhair -- a musician we've not talked about in the podcast, but who made New Orleans R&B music in the same style as Domino and Pri…
47 min
Irish and Celtic Music Podcast
Irish and Celtic Music Podcast
Marc Gunn
St. Patrick's March #497
We’re marching our way towards St Patrick’s Day on the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast. Subscribe and get 34 Celtic MP3s for Free. The Bookends, Marc Gunn, Sam Gillogly, Deirdre Graham, The Gas Men, Roads to Home, The Known World Project, Lorcan Mac Mathuna, Hawp, The Darkeyed Musician, Scythian, Reilly, Tuatha de Danann, Andrew McManus, Brad Tuck I hope you enjoyed this week's show. If you did, please share the show on social or with a friend. The Irish & Celtic Music Podcast is here to build our diverse Celtic community and help the incredible artists who so generously share their music with you. If you hear music you love, buy the albums, shirts, and songbooks, follow the artists on streaming, see their shows, and drop them an email to let them know you heard them on the Irish and Celtic Music Podcast. Every week, you can get Celtic music news in your inbox. The Celtic Music Magazine is a quick and easy way to plug yourself into more great Celtic culture. Subscribe and get 34 Celtic MP3s for Free. VOTE IN THE CELTIC TOP 20 This is our way of finding the best songs and artists each year. Just list the show number, and the name of as many bands in the episode as you like. Your vote helps me create next year's Best Celtic music of 2021 episode. Vote Now! THIS WEEK IN CELTIC MUSIC 0:03 - The Bookends "St Patrick's March" from Chapter One 5:05 - WELCOME 5:37 - Marc Gunn, Sam Gillogly "Battle of Aughrim/Star of Munster" from Selcouth 9:11 - Deirdre Graham "Uamh an Oir" from URRANTA Pronunciation Uamh an Oir - Oo-uv un Ore 14:00 - The Gas Men "Patsy Geary's/Connie O'Connell's/Going to the Well for Water" from Clement Street 17:58 - Roads to Home "Carrickfergus" from Dark of the Moon 22:52 - CELTIC FEEDBACK 27:35 - The Known World Project "Thig am Bata" from The Willow Sessions Pronunciation Thig an bata - Hig un but-ah 30:02 - Lorcan Mac Mathuna "The Dead Kings" from An Bhuatais & The Meaning of Life Pronunciation An Bhuatais - Un Voo-a-tish 37:13 - Hawp "O, Mary Turn Awa'" from Storm and Calm 39:44 - The Darkeyed Musician "The Pledge" from The Pledge 43:53 - THANKS 45:10 - Scythian "Galway City" feat. Shane Hayes from Roots & Stones 48:36 - Reilly "Brave the Fight" from Saints of the Ocean 52:16 - Tuatha de Danann "The Master Reels" from In Nomine Eireann 57:30 - Andrew McManus "One of a Kind" from Days of Wonder 1:01:56 - CLOSING 1:03:14 - Brad Tuck "Off to Sea" from The Rocky Isle The Irish & Celtic Music Podcast was edited by Mitchell Petersen with Graphics by Miranda Nelson Designs. The show was produced by Marc Gunn, The Celtfather. To subscribe, go to Apple Podcasts or to our website where you can become a Patron of the Podcast for as little as $1 per episode. Promote Celtic culture through music at http://celticmusicpodcast.com/. WELCOME TO CELTIC MUSIC * Helping you celebrate Celtic culture through music. My name is Marc Gunn. I am a Celtic musician and podcaster. This show is dedicated to the indie Celtic musicians. Please support these artists. Share the show with your friends. And find more episodes at celticmusicpodcast.com. You can also support this podcast on Patreon. ATTN Celtic Musicians. I’m looking for some good stories to share. You see, I also host the Pub Songs Podcast. I started sharing stories from musicians about their songs. I’d like to do more of those. So if you have a story that you’d like to share about a song, from a gig, or maybe even just a piece of Celtic history that you love. Drop me an email at marc@marcgunn.com. Put “Pub Story” in the show subject. Tell me about your story. Maybe I’ll ask you to record your story for the show. THANK YOU PATRONS OF THE PODCAST! Because of Your kind and generous support, this show comes out every week. Your generosity funds the creation, promotion and production of the show. It allows us to attract new listeners and to help our community grow. As a patron, you get to hear episodes before regular listeners. When we hit a milestone, you get an extra-long episode. You can pledge a dollar or more per episode and cap how much you want to spend each month over on Patreon. A super special thanks to our newest patrons: Cynthia R, shawn b, Mark B, Paul Crowley You can become a generous Patron of the Podcast on Patreon at SongHenge.com. TRAVEL WITH CELTIC INVASION VACATIONS Every year, I take a small group of Celtic music fans on the relaxing adventure of a lifetime. We don't see everything. Instead, we stay in one area. We get to know the region through its culture, history, and legends. You can join us with an auditory and visual adventure through podcasts and videos. Learn more about the invasion at http://celticinvasion.com/ #celticmusic #irishmusic #celticpodcast I WANT YOUR FEEDBACK What are you doing today while listening to the podcast? You can send a written comment along with a picture of what you're doing while listening. Email a voicemail message to celticpodcast@gmail.com James Slaven emailed photos: "Hey, Marc! Hope things are going well! Still immensely enjoying the podcast. It's been quite helpful as I hike around state parks to get some socially distanced exercise and keep sane during my ten months (so far) of working from home. A few pictures are attached of various hikes that I was taking while listening to your various shows. There's nothing like having the bagpipes come on as you crest a hill and see a beautiful lake! Also, I'm enjoying the variety in the shows. Bagpipe and Irish pub tunes are my two favorites, but being exposed to other fusion genres and having a nice mixture of genders and of cultures is awesome. Keep up the good work!" Mike Nichols emailed: "I think you have played a track from Sea Star on one of your programs I have heard. I believe Faye was part of a duo that performed under the moniker of Syren. I have one track of theirs from the old "noise trade " or downloads,com days. Red is the Rose: I love this track to a degree that is not reasonable. Wondering if you have any information about where that music catalog might be available. Would love to hear Great Selkie or Moon Jubilee, I'm sure your cast experience could weave either of those into a fantastic episode of one of creatures and the other of celebration songs. Just Mike's opinion. Thanks for a terrific show. Your great work helps me with long drives at my work. I've been busily sharing the show with a few select friends. Thanks again" David Black emailed: "Hi, Further to your episode #483 about being poor but happy I would suggest an Irish song immediately suited to this subject called Cad É Sin Don Té Sin (a rather strange expression in the Irish Language meaning, what's it to you if it doesn't bother you). Altan have done a great version with a different melody." KIM KNEBEL emailed: "Hi Marc. Just listened to the recent podcast featuring women in Celtic music. Suggestion for the new version: The Holman sisters of Tuatha Dea (Rebecca Mullikin) and their violinist, Laura Smith. The song Alienn Dun is haunting and their voices just amazing. While they've gone a bit more to the rock side, their older music has a Celtic/Gypsy flair. Laura is a newer addition and is pretty amazing. Thank you for all you do!!"
1 hr 6 min
Cinematic Sound Radio - Soundtracks From Films, TV and Video Games
Cinematic Sound Radio - Soundtracks From Films, TV and Video Games
Erik Woods
The Archive with Jason Drury: Quartet Records Spotlight
Welcome to a new series here on the CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST NETWORK called the QUARTET RECORDS SPOTLIGHT. Over the past 27 episodes of THE ARCHIVE, Jason Drury has played a plethora of music from the independent soundtrack label QUARTET RECORDS. Since its inception, the label has released 400 albums featuring an eclectic slate of new and old film and TV scores. Since the label has been so kind to us over the years, Jason decided to present an ongoing new program dedicated solely to the label. And to make the show even more special, Jason asked film music restorer and mastering engineer Chris Malone to participate and offer his opinions on all four recent releases as he worked on for QUARTET RECORDS. The show begins with selections from the legendary epic western THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY composed by Ennio Morricone. Then you will be hearing music from a re-recording of Bernard Herrmann’s score for the 1972 British horror-mystery, ENDLESS NIGHT. The show continues with the classic 1969 Oscar-winning film MIDNIGHT COWBOY with music composed and supervised by John Barry. The program ends with John Addison’s wonderful score for the 1977 epic World War II drama A BRIDGE TOO FAR. Enjoy! —— Cinematic Sound Radio is fully licensed to play music by SOCAN. Check out our NEW Cinematic Sound Radio TeePublic Store! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/cinematic-sound-radio Cinematic Sound Radio Web: http://www.cinematicsound.net Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/cinsoundradio Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cinematicsound Cinematic Sound Radio Fanfare and Theme by David Coscina https://soundcloud.com/user-970634922 Bumper voice artist: Tim Burden http://www.timburden.com
1 hr 35 min
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